Thorsten Stiller, EMEA Senior Sales Consultant, Sales Planning & Strategy Dell Technologies | Field Sales Enablement, joined DACH Regional Host, Britta Lorenz, to discuss the power of MEDDIC.

What is MEDDIC?  It is a framework for discovery where the letters stand for:

  • Metrics – What are the #s driving the deal?
  • Economic Buyer – Who are we impacting with this deal?
  • Decision Criteria – What is the prioritized list of criteria that will guide who the prospect buys from?
  • Decision Process – What process is the prospect using to decide who to buy from?
  • Identified Pain or Value Drivers – What is customer seeking to gain as a result of this buying journey?
  • Champion – Who is my partner on the buyer side that is helping me of navigating the buying process?

MEDDIC can be customized to your needs, powerful and worth understanding.

Thorsten notes, in addition that he is happy to help companies to implement MEDDIC as Coaching and Communication process:

  • Starting with common first Information about the idea and process, how to use and what are the expectations
  • Second for Managers how to support and motivate the sales force on implementation and value drive
  • Third a quality check and alignment of potential shortfalls and improvements, to share best practices

 His special offer is to help companies in German or English language on all three stages via:

  • Upon request a deeper dive into the MEDDIC terminologies and sales process, what does good look like
  • Or, a general Company session on Sales Strategy, what to expect and what to invest when implementing MEDDIC
Check out all the great sales coaching content available on Trust Enablement.
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Audio Transcript

Britta Lorenz  
All right. Welcome to today’s coffee collaboration and enablement. I am here with Torsten Stiller, and I’m super excited to speak about medic. Torsten, welcome to the show.

Thorsten Stiller  
Thank you. Thanks for having me. Great to meet you again.

Britta Lorenz  
Sophie, Thorsten, before we start, can I invite you to tell us a little bit about yourself who you are, where you’re coming from?

Thorsten Stiller  
What’s your background? Sure, sure. So my name is Joseph Diller. I’m a sales enablement chair at Dell Technologies right now based in Germany. My responsibility is more on the Middle East Africa side, Russia and Europe. I am working in the IT industry for the last 30 years. sales marketing background. Yeah, for the last 15 years in kind of sales enablement as is the quality is new, but there’s development partner developing business, developing sales. That’s what I’ve done last 15 years within the media and on global programs. But I think there’s almost no country in India, which I haven’t done any activity or any campaign or program run. Well,

Britta Lorenz  
what a wealth of experience, I mean, 30 years in the IT sector, 15 years in enablement. So to speak of Torsten, how did you actually come into the enablement space or into the enablement sector? How did that trick was a trigger?

Thorsten Stiller  
Yeah, when there was definitely a need for helping sales to be more productive, more efficient, and to look at what kind of programs can we run in order to help them to do their job better, in addition to what they’re already having capabilities on. And we can see also there is due to new research, for example, on the buyer side, on the seller side, you can also see that there’s more behavior or more touch into the How can I go forward? What is my go to market and how does it change? And these alignments on salespeople, especially on experienced salespeople, is something which sales enablement is driving or maybe on young you experience a new salespeople on the new hire, which is also part of the enablement activities.

Britta Lorenz  
Wow. Great, wonderful. So our topic of today medic, I mean, plays perfectly into the enablement space as well, because we need to introduce it. And let’s start with that. thoreson. If I ask you to explain medic, in one sentence, how would you do that?

Thorsten Stiller  
Pa? Impossible. But I’ll try. So medic, as a very plain, very easy to understand topic would be a best practice to structure the communication around the sales cycle and the buying cycle within an engagement, which means it gives an open view on the sales cycle, as well as the buying cycle from a customer and the needs and the communication between maybe for a manager to coach his salesperson and tools, and what what kind of needs is is needed in order to drive that forward. So very plain one, the best practice structure in order to communicate better. Cool,

Britta Lorenz  
cool. That was awesome. In one sentence. No, but the summary was so big. So before we dive into the acronym itself, all the different things that stand behind, can you give our audience also a little background information of the development very last metric come from who invented it? Where is it based? All those little bits and pieces, which make it even more interesting, besides knowing how it works? And what affected EZ Pass?

Thorsten Stiller  
Yes, sure. So medical, as I said, is a best practice or structures, not a scientific methodology, or whatever you would expect. But this is something where two or three guys in the northwest of north east of us through the New England states, Massachusetts, coming from an IT company, and they had to manage many sales cycles with a complex solution, software hardware services, as in complex environments, complex customer environments, and therefore, they have to find a structure or a way how can they track themselves? Or can they measure? How can they define their opportunity if it’s a closed one or it’s an early one or maybe an opportunity which is not that easy to manage? So they what they defined as they divided the framework, and the most important is here. I think that that is a complex environment and a clump complex. Because that that makes it makes it useful to introduce medic and to use this kind of framework because it takes time to, to populate the framework or the communication structure. But it also helps it gives it a lot of wealth. And that’s why they started this many years ago. And it’s no really moving on to other companies, as medic as med pick, and so on. So it’s even developed further. And there’s the big adoption, especially for complex products, if I’m selling selling them into complex environments.

Britta Lorenz  
So it’s really for complex sales, as you mentioned, complex products, complexes cycle, b2b business,

Thorsten Stiller  
most likely, definitely challenging the status quo, challenging situations where customer think I have a I know, I have an issue here, it’s not a most protective, it’s not the most efficient. But I want, I don’t know if I can change that. And in these kinds of complex environments, where I don’t know, is there a solution for that, if I have a solution, which maybe helps this customer, then I need to get in and this and this, it’s not an over the counter off the shelf product, which is transactional, it’s a really solution selling, developing that opportunity, and measuring the opportunity how it goes forward on a buying cycle from a customer developing their needs, and their buying cycle, as well as a sales cycle. And that’s what’s what’s medic is tracking the sales cycle.

Britta Lorenz  
Super. So we heard complex selling complex solutions, medic, per se, it’s an acronym, which is also a little complex. Can you give us more insights into what does each single letter of the acronym stand for? And maybe I’ll explain it with one or two examples alongside to it.

Thorsten Stiller  
Okay, okay, that will take a minute. But I go ahead. So first of all, medic, nothing to do with any medical misled, sometimes it is just really acronyms for stages, or for ideas, which is important to have the information on an envoy is more interesting is that the most important letters is m, and I it’s not m starting and then going forward. But it sounds nicer if you say medic, than if you say, whatever. Therefore, medic starts with a matrix with M for matrix. And that word defines the numbers. So people time, money, anything which has a number aligned to the customers gain. So what he wants trying to achieve, if you’re coming from a top down, the management has a strategy and says we want to be number two, number three, we want to gain market share, that says that that’s a very strength, strong number, which which we aligned to, we keep that number as the target. So the metric is a very important number. Sometimes it can be developed, within the process, as a total cost of ownership model or an ROI calculation are these, it’s also a good number. But it has to be a real number of people time, money, any any kind of these which I can measure. So that’s the M, the E is the economic buyer. And that’s the person who is making the calls, who is initiating or who the status quo will change. It might be not the purchasing department, it might be not even the buying department, which could be it or any any logistics or whatever. But the business unit who is taking the advantage, who is really, really, really getting the advantage, and also makes the last call saying no, we don’t see that we keep the status quo, we keep on going like we do, because it’s not a it’s not really a change for us. So the this is the economic migrants and important to know him, because if the last call person you want to know. And the third one is the D, it’s a decision criteria. And decision criteria is important because it could be a catalog, a list of criterias. And you want to know the priorities. So the decision criteria is not only one like oh, by price, which is everybody knows all price. Cool. Yeah. But it’s it’s also the ease of use, how adaptable, is it into existing systems? How? How applicable? Is it? How can we use it into our, our environment? And how easy can we install that? So there’s a lot of different criterias maybe they might have different priorities, but it’s important to know this criterias and maybe to add on your unique selling value. And that’s, that’s that’s then the art in using medic, only first to know the decision criteria, but also to maybe enrich it.

Britta Lorenz  
So it means also that even though it’s a framework, you can still have a certain flexibility and agility based on your needs.

Thorsten Stiller  
Correct? Correct. You can also influence that’s why medic is not a one time evaluation of an opportunity, it’s really a going forward and moving it, moving it over the stages. And the next one next years, then the decision process, which is, you mentioned, you say that it’s a process where I can see that, hey, first challenging status quo defining the needs. We all know what a what a buying process looks like, from a customer perspective. And the same in the sales process. So these kind of stages in the process, this is what the process is the decision process. And it’s not only the purchasing process, sometimes it is really just combined or Okay, this is when when purchasing departments getting it and this is when we define and get the final call and no, no, it’s actually before and after. So it’s a much, much longer. And it’s important to know that, first of all, to support it, maybe to influence it, but definitely to be head on and know where are you? And where is your customer? going forward?

Britta Lorenz  
Okay, great. How many times or not? How many times? But how do you feel was the uptake of decision process and decision criterias? And all those things? Because if we don’t follow a specific framework, we might forget some key stakeholders or forget some key questions to ask them throughout the process. Did you see improvement in the rate of how people actually avoided those mistakes by following up to D so far as we described it? Yeah, absolutely.

Thorsten Stiller  
And that’s why medic is a communication framework. It’s communication with the customer and the salesperson, but also the salesperson and the manager. And there are some questions. That’s why medic is not only the acronyms, it’s also tons of questions based on different industries. We had, for example, a medic questionnaire for security reasons, only a medic questionnaire for backup, a medic questionnaire for IT infrastructure, and so on. So they are different questions, but also for the different stages. And by rolling the communication with the customer, and with a manager who can support maybe some stages where you say, Oh, we are now at the decision process where they, they are not certain about the technology. So let’s do a proof of concept lab and show them how it works. So in order to ensure them that the technology is capable to do what they asked him, and this comes from the manager to the salesperson, because he has the authority to initiate and invest into that proof of concept. So it’s a constant communication. And you’re absolutely right. And thanks for mentioning that. It’s all question based each of the stages MED D, I see they all have questions in order to communicate go forward. And if you’re feeling now, we have a good view on the decision criteria, then look at the decision process and move on.

Britta Lorenz  
Awesome, awesome. And as amended move on, what’s the eye, once the eye and acronym,

Thorsten Stiller  
the eye is the most important? And Funny enough, it’s not them. It’s not the the other is the most important because it belongs very much to the to the end MMI is what we call the compelling event in typical sales terminology. So the eye is identify either the pain if you want to have pain, or you want to say that positively identify the value drive. So what is the value the customer wants to gain when he is installing this solution, or when he is coming over? That’s that was core, that’s the efficiency gap, which he doesn’t have. So that’s exactly the point where the I and the metrics, so what I’m trying to achieve what I’m trying to achieve in order to get forward and to install and invest and buy something, plus the metric which I measure how what I want to achieve, these two are the most important. And when we do medic reviews, this is what we asked him first the AI and M so identify the value drive. And last but not least, see the champion test that’s the person who helps me who is working with the baby gets often advantaged by maybe getting a promotion if it’s installed and so on. Definitely a person who has to be in the process, not outside and also a person who is accountable, capable and and strong to stand up and say oh, yeah, but we have another solution. But the solution is having the decision criteria and we put that on number one on the on the priorities. And they they they keeping that to 90% or 100%. And the other solution is only keeping that to 50% really standing up and saying this is the best solution. I don’t want to say that this must be a person who is in favor of me or which I’m bribing or don’t say that and be very careful with that. But it’s definitely a person who has a champion for that solution. And I can have different champions for different solutions. Now we’re talking about the complexity, I can have many, many extremes at the same customer, maybe for different products. So a different investments at the same customer, for different products, they all can be complex. And now I have to manage. And by asking the questions, I get a good view and have a good overview of all of these. And that that’s really the the magic or the best practice which which have been installed and many sales organizations, m e, d, d, IC. And going forward to that.

Britta Lorenz  
I just love how you describe it as a process, a framework, and a communication tool, which really aligns everyone. And even though we’re speaking about metrics, we are speaking about commercial values, we are speaking about decision makers about solutions. In the end, it’s a tool also to bring us together again as people and be human centric in the overall decision process. I think that’s really wonderful to hear. Hear. Thank you Taurus, for that explanation.

Thorsten Stiller  
Absolutely. And, as you said, when we were talking about magic, and you putting it in the coaching content, and managing is one capability. But adding on coaching by asking questions, and having these questions is really adding on to the sales cycle and to the to the human interaction. You’re absolutely right, by having questions and asking, it’s not like, hey, you’re not there yet. You have to go there. It’s a customer who is making the calls when he wants to do go to the next stage. But I can ask the questions in order to lead the customer. And I can tell to my manager, hey, this is where we are right now. Because this or that reason? Absolutely, absolutely.

Britta Lorenz  
Tours Now also, our frameworks and processes out there, I mean, being in this space for 30 years, on your side, me having some kind of experience as well. We’ve heard them for example, band or other major frameworks, what are the key differentiators from your point of view? to them? And when is it useful to apply medic? And when not?

Thorsten Stiller  
Yeah, I think they lay the end of your question is the most important, when do we apply them I mean, they all have the good place. And and then they all make sense if it’s banned, or meant, or, and then maybe medic or med pick, they’re all growing, let me say it that way and when to apply, it makes a lot of sense to start with, but maybe I want to have that information at the beginning. So I have want to have a certain amount of information regarding an opportunity at the beginning. But fundament are these kinds of things where I just frame the opportunity. And I can I’m not tracking the process or not as as close as medic would do, or med pick, where we adding the paper process and the competition in medic, medic. So therefore, and is very good. And if I have a smaller opportunity, if I have an easier opportunity, which maybe does not have that long process as a certain amount of value, or complexity either within my organization or the customers organization, I would move from band as a starting point to medic. And that’s easily easily done. Now, we have seen this many times that we’re talking to a customer about one solution starts very small, just like a purchase of any kind of goods or product. And then he sees that, Oh, well I need the installation, I need the training, I need the software on top of it and it has to be implemented. And I want to have all everything from you. And all of a sudden that purchase of a product moves into a bigger, really complex project with has a rollout with has a also bigger budget, different signatures. And then it moved from a bunch of release to medic. And that’s also reflected in our system so that we have fund fields but also medic fields. And if it hits a certain amount of value, or a certain amount of complexity, it moves into medic.

Britta Lorenz  
So you’re actually saying it’s inclusive, it doesn’t say either or it’s really make take the best out of it and use it to your best needs and how it suits to your overall process. So it’s a real inclusive process, which brings together the best of the breed and also make it work for you as you need it as you need it in the process

Thorsten Stiller  
itself. Absolutely. Absolutely brother because as you said, it is not you cannot do medic for any opportunity. If it’s just a small opportunity of transactional buying, purchasing transaction. You wouldn’t do a medic for that one. Maybe you do a band because you say, Okay, I want to track where how it’s going and maybe repeat that. But the, the energy and the work you’re putting into a medic is much higher than we put into the band. And that’s why start slow. Start with a band and maybe set yourself a threshold where you say, every deal over $500,000, we move into medic, because it takes longer or everything which has a closing date, which is next quarter or something like that. But you have to track and follow up on. Wonderful, thank

Britta Lorenz  
you for that Thurston. So, I’m totally bought into my medic, I love the method, I come back to my company. I just heard our talk here. And I’m like, that’s implemented as an enabler and also as a salesperson no matter where I’m coming from, from what angle but I want to have that in my organization. Now, what are some tips and tricks on how to get the buy in from management as well as on how to implement it actually, in the organization? person? Can you give us some guidelines here? Those are two questions are both very ours about both?

Thorsten Stiller  
Well, let me let me maybe share some best practices on this. So first of all, if I have to convince my management, there are several reasons. Definitely it is a strategic tool, which has to be really decided by the management to implement and maybe implement with pilot group, this small sales area first, notice, see how they get it. But there’s definitely a lot of advantages in adding it into your other sales process, the sales go to market programs, and so on. Because it’s not only that people are feel like, Okay, I’m more solid, in my communication. Managers feel like, wow, I can really coach my salespeople. But also, especially for companies who are doing kind of built to order, or solutions, which are more complex, as we said, it’s also easier to get there the bottom line, because if I know that I have a bigger probability of closing that deal. At that time, I can own those source from my suppliers. Give an example, when drive shares, hard drives have been very, very scarce, from our from from from Asia, because of flooding, or whatever it was, it was very, very tough to give, to keep all the timelines with all the production. The beauty here is by having medic and knowing what deal will close when on a very, very, very tight schedule, on a very precise probability, it really helps to source and then also to put the product in the right products, which we are always aiming and then putting into the biggest solutions into the right solutions at the right time. So it really helps us to keep our promises, it’s also also to keep money, because we mean, if you source later, if you buy later, you can save some money because you don’t have to stock it, and so on and so on. So that’s number one, in order to show the value to management, it’s really an MRP tool, you can really work on your enterprise resource resource management, it really helps in the sales cycle in order to sell better and it also helps in the, in the resize the company culture, because people feel like their value their their their knowledge, which they gain outside where the customer is really rolling up to the management because it’s seen if you take the medic, and you do kind of weekly reviews of the top deals and something like that, so they’re really on top of them, they know where to invest. Maybe where they’re not. Awesome. Okay. Well, that’s how to play how to implement Okay. Oh, that’s a tough one. Yeah, the implementation is a very, very careful one. Because people I mean, if it’s something coming you we are all human beings, we hate change. We are to align with change is really, I have to do this with myself or they have to do it on all levels on the Salesforce on the management and on the strategic management of a company management. I have to do it top down and bottom up both sides. So it’s really important to implement that not as a control tool and say, oh, we’re having a new measurement here. There. Here it is. Go ahead. It’s really putting it into a communication framework, where we all have the same view where we all share information, and where if you have the information from a customer, I can support you with the right tools. So we did is we had always medic for salespeople and medic for managers, which is totally different because the managers need to know when to support and what are my tools which I can bring to the medic process? And which questions Do I have to ask in order to put the right investment or the right support to my salesperson? That’s a really supporting Tullio at that point.

Britta Lorenz  
And I love that part of medic for management and medic for the salespeople. And to match it. I think that’s a awesome approach. Can you share some experiences on the adoption? how that went? And what were the hurdles? And what were the really the accelerators when using layers here?

Thorsten Stiller  
Yes, yes. I mean, for myself, personally, it’s more the methodology on how to fill it. So it’s good to review the quality. Also, to measure the outcome, do we have a better pipeline to have a better, higher probability and and, and prediction rate, and so on. So that’s definitely something you would measure anyway. But from a management perspective, how they support, you can see that there is more, maybe more activity, more activity and proof of concept in our eyes in in these kind of supporting tools, which needs a little bit investment from the company in order to support the customer on the on their buying cycle. But you can see that there’s more activity, because a manager understands better that Oh, and the best, as you’re asking for best practices and sharing, sharing some experiences, the best was really when the managers went together, and shared what they have done in different sales cycles, because they coming up with different ideas. I was at that sales cycle stage. And by the way I did that, or, oh, we have been close to the negotiation. And the customer was not convinced that we are maybe the best partner for them. And therefore, our big CEO wrote a letter what we have done over the last 20 years together, what kind of business we did together and how thankful we are for that. And all of a sudden, they understand Oh, yeah, we’re working with 20. We’re doing this for 20 years already. Great. So yeah, they are trusted partner. So these kinds of activities inside of the company, then moving into into a sales cycle. That’s the helpful part. And that’s, that’s the examples of how managers can be creative and share their ideas within the manager field. can be very easy can be really, really very easy things. An example was the champion. The question was, is that really the champion, which was mentioned by the salesperson? And my idea was, Hey, why don’t you go for dinner, and have a chat, salesperson, the champion, and you as a manager, and then you decide yourself, if this, this person will be our champion, because he can do what we expect them to do. And he will stand up. And he isn’t these kind of processes, which are, so very easy things, but it’s always activity.

Britta Lorenz  
So it’s also supporting the collaboration between different layers, and between the teams. And as we heard already, many times, it’s a communication tool, which definitely enhances the performance of everyone.

Thorsten Stiller  
Absolutely, absolutely. Bring in references. Now. I don’t know, I don’t know if the customer is believing what we are capable to do that, hey, I have a reference, which we did with the other salesperson. But salespeople don’t talk to each other very often. So he bring the manager brings in that, hey, we have done this, that the other customer, maybe we can do a reference visit I can I can manage that for you. And then we bring customer a to customer B, and they will talk to each other. We’ll see how well it works and how we change this. That was cool. Yeah, exactly. These kinds of ideas and creativity and also best practice sharing within the organization, that change also the culture. Yeah.

Britta Lorenz  
Thorson. I mean, you’ve shared so many valuable insights with us. And I think we could speak for another hour, at least, about this wonderful topic. I have to be cautious about time in order to make sure the audience also has enough time to digest what we just discussed. And if anybody wants to get in touch with you, what’s the best way?

Thorsten Stiller  
Oh, LinkedIn. I’m a LinkedIn junkie. Being in sales enablement, I have met so many people over all my life in sales enablement. And I always tried to stick in contact by if we had a personal relationship, like a call a video chat or personal meeting at a at a trade show or anything. I tried to stick in contact through LinkedIn. So LinkedIn is the best way to approach me. Super.

Britta Lorenz  
Thank you very much Torsten for your time and thanks for your sharing. And yeah, let’s stay You for what to come next and speak this and thank you very much

Thorsten Stiller  
pleasures all mine. Thank you and if you need this, maybe more extended. Give me a call if you need it in German and English in any kind of language. I’m here. I’m happy to help. Thank you very much. Wonderful pleasure. Thank you. Bye bye