Lessons learned as we hand off hosting of the UK and Ireland to Rebecca Bell

Rebecca Bell takes the hosting reigns for UK and Ireland in her first episode, sitting down with former host, Dr. Jeremy Noad.

The show primarily focused in on the lessons Jeremy learned from the sessions over the course of hosting these shows but also reviewed his approach to Sales Effectiveness at Linde.

Jeremy’s team is not trying to be all things to all people in the business.  Instead, they focus on the following 3Cs:

?Coach in business
?Collaborate on projects
?Concierge Service

Do you have a similar approach or are you trying to be all things to all people?

Give a listen and remain curious.

And let us know, how do you want to help improve the Enablement profession?
Audio Transcript

Rebecca Bell
Well, hello, and welcome to this my first episode as host of the trust enablement UK and Ireland podcast. And those of you who are alerting regular listeners and viewers of this podcast will recognize the fact I’m a new host. And my name is Rebecca Bell, and those who do not know me, I’ll do a very brief introduction to you. So I’ve been working in enablement, perhaps for about 15 years, maybe longer than I even knew what enablement was. Some may say, I still have a lot to learn. And I’m a really enthusiastic for this topic. So I not only am involved from a professional perspective in my day job, but I’m also very heavily involved in organizations like the sales enablement society. So I founded the UK chapter in 2016, alongside my very good friend image and record, and continue to be very closely involved in that today and you know, regularly hosting conversations on the topic with my my UK colleagues and enablement enthusiasts. Additionally to that I’m served on the global board of advisors for the society. And I’m also involved in a new project, which is really interesting with Johns Hopkins University in the US. And we’re seeking to build a curriculum for a new course in sales enablement, almost certifying people as enablement, professionals, which would be really, really interesting thing. So enough about me, I’m very happy to connect with anyone who wants to reach out to me, I’m very active on LinkedIn. So come and find me if you if you want to do that. But enough about me, we are now going to move over and welcome my very first guest, and those of you who have been regular listeners, and viewers will need very little introduction to Dr. Jeremy node. He joins me today. Jeremy, welcome to you.

Dr. Jeremy Noad
Well, thank you, Rebecca, and congratulations on this new adventure for your

Rebecca Bell
lovely, thank you. Well, thank you for asking me to do it. I hope that in handing me the mantle, you don’t have any regrets. And very thrilled to work with john and the rest of the team and all the other hosts who are working on this trust and naming curriculum, because I think it’s a really important set of conversations we’re having here around the industry. And I hopefully it’s helping people to learn more, get more engaged. And I certainly learned so much from from colleagues around the world, who are doing enablement in many different ways, you know, many different practices. So many of the ideas that I’m hoping to put into practice today come from the active task of getting to talk to different people in this very fast growing industry. So very excited to be here and to be hosting you today in this conversation. So as the outgoing host, you probably will need less introduction than many more guests, but maybe for some of the new listeners for folks who may be tuning in for the first time. Can you talk a little bit about your current role and what you’re up to in enablement?

Dr. Jeremy Noad
Yeah, I think there’s so thank you. So what I think is, my current role is I mean as a job title, its global Director of Sales effectiveness and pricing for Lindy, and if you haven’t heard of Lindy, basically, we take the out of the sky packages for you to go and make fabulous products and services for your customers. That’s what we do. But I’ve been in this sort of the sales enablement space, we still call it sales effectiveness. But yeah, we’re a traditional company. We’ve been going 130 odd years, so we’re slow to change some of the names. But in this space since around 2010, and working with lots of different organizations within the group, multiple countries, I managed to sort of get around and work with businesses within the group on every continent, explaining the Arctic’s well, Finland’s in the Arctic, so maybe the North Arctic, but working with those countries around different topics around sales enablement, sales effectiveness, and that’s sort of been my primary piece. Outside of that, since the launch of the International Journal of sales transformation, which is a journal and a website that seeks to take the academic research around sales and sales effectiveness and marketing and translate it into usable content by practitioners, ie people go and do the work. So I’ve been doing that for the past seven years, focusing very much on looking at the cutting edge research coming out of the universities, and getting that published and circulated. And then one of the other sort of pieces as well as you mentioned, Yeah, working as the the host of the trust now podcast for a short while, is in last October, co authored and published the first book, which literally the first book called selling professionally, which is aimed at people looking to join the profession of sales and takes him through all the pieces that we want to teach them around the sales process and how to handle customers. And that’s done very well, in terms of sales reviews. Yeah, it even sort of had the big twist of being a best seller in the Amazon world. But nicely, it was in the best selling in sales and marketing books, which is quite a big category. I think he managed to hang out there for a few days. But you know, wasn’t once a month, but yeah, so we have that out. And looking to sort of move forward on that sort of approach of getting some knowledge from people and sort of bring it together into a book. And the next one’s on its way.

Rebecca Bell
Fantastic. Well, firstly, congratulations on that I have a long held dream of being a published author. So I need to get my skates on, I think. So you talked about working in your current organization for about 10 or 11 years. And I’m interested in in your route into sales enablement, because, and certainly this is something that, you know, we’re thinking and talking a lot about with that Johns Hopkins thing I talked about a minute ago, which is, where are people? Where are they coming from? What’s their background professionally, because I think very few people I see or hear or come across in this enablement industry have started in enablement. Many of them have migrated here from other functions and disciplines. So what’s your routine,

Dr. Jeremy Noad
so I think the routine is quite varied. And I’m not gonna go through everything. But you know, things I did before I got there, pilot, teacher,

Unknown Speaker
Chef,

Dr. Jeremy Noad
nightclub host, Benitez car sales, running a car repair, shop, selling internet and broadband access to to government organizations, distribution of media, managing trucks, production, making stuff, and then sort of started to sort of move into more sales and looking at sort of sales, as a salesperson as a sales manager as a key account manager, then moved into the marketing side sort of channel management, business ownership sort of thing, responsible for working on a couple of joint ventures, to the top two out of sort of a sales and marketing director, and then switched into the sales enablement, role sort of thing. And I started that in 2010, I started that on a sort of a clear mission, which was to try and define what’s good look like in sales. And so I sort of spent a few months looking at how, what makes it good and how we can bring it together and sort of quantify it to benchmarking and benchmarking is not new. But what we’re trying to do is sort of make it really relevant for our industry and our business. And so over a period of time, I sort of found 42 elements of sales effectiveness, then, then you sort of try and try and benchmarking by saying What does good look like? What does executor look like? What what what, where do we find practice that we can copy across the business to sort of move for the greater good, better? If and that sort of benchmarking work, which probably from bill to sort of doing this sort of first cycle took about 18 months, two years. And from that it’s moving into the programs. And that’s probably where we get to the more traditional sales enablement side of it. You know, have we got the skills and capabilities where I with coaching? Do we have the right information? What’s our analytics look like? What does our sales and and move into programs to say, Okay, now we know what good looks like. And now we know where everybody is, what all the programs you need to move to. And then obviously, that drifts very much into tools, and digital tools. So it’s been a period of time managing the the global rollout of CRM, CRM in other countries. You know, one, one platform for everybody with local variations, sort of progressed over the years and now it’s more focused on specific topics around revenue enablement, very much sort of trying to tie in the focus of what we do as a firm But also what we think I’ve got the biggest impact. So we’re kind of more looking now at demand generation. Where are we with that as an end to NPS? Where are we with? how we manage our pricing, how we manage our contracts? And just get into those sort of big chunks of activity to say, Where are we? Where can we be improved? Where can we where are we exceptional, and we can share? What tools do we need and how that moves forward. When you’re in a sort of a global process, you know, nothing makes a country manager more happy when you turn up and say, Hi, I’m here to help from head office. So we try and avoid that once we look at it and say, okay, we take three words, because we can’t manage everything in the whole world. And we don’t want to manage everything. And so the team and I sort of focus on on the three C’s, we’re either going to try and coach you as a business within the group to improve and advise you, we’re going to collaborate with you on projects. And sometimes we’re going to be a concierge service. We’re just somebody who’s got a really good idea, or somebody wants to sell us a new bit of technology, we will do all the assessments and filtering. And then if you come to me and say, Okay, I’m not happy with our performance in x or y, then I might be able to go to my little black book, and concierge you a solution that we haven’t built in house. That’s kind of the day job.

Rebecca Bell
Wow. So many things about I love I mean, firstly, my goodness, you know, some people say you can have two or three different careers you’ve had, I don’t know a lifetime’s worth of different things. And, uh, but but really interested to hear, firstly, you know, things like you’ve been a pilot, well, you know, a lot of this is like, we got to drive, you’ve got to drive the plane forward in a role like yours, even if you don’t know that the navigation sometimes, you know, you’ve been in production, you know, we know that we’re churning stuff out and creating, I think it’s quite a creative role. So I love some of your roots in because I can see how, you know, elements of them absolutely. Kind of benefiting you today. And then that your journey in your co role is so interesting. Because, I mean, oftentimes you arrive and somebody in sales has got this idea, like, Oh, we want more of their so you’re going to do more of that. And it becomes either a very much a knee jerk or sort of random acts of enablement. Whereas what I loved about what you said is like you took a very formulaic, very processed view of benchmarking before you could build, and I mean, lucky you in a way that they, you have the trust that they allowed you to go through 18 months of that process, because I mean, many organizations just want it No, no, no, don’t mean, so.

Dr. Jeremy Noad
Yeah, I think the the fortunate thing is, the company is, is quite European centric. And we had a process view of everything else. And so how you did x, y, Zed, even how you paid an invoice, or how you sort of got that there was a process. And where we didn’t have any processes in terms of like business processes was in sales and marketing, because fundamentally, we can Swan around like pirates and do what we want. And that’s the general view, you know, the expectation is, we’re on the golf course, or we’re sort of just sort of drinking coffee and Starbucks and that sort of thing. So having this sort of process based view was was within the country, the culture of the company. And they recognized that, you know, we needed to do something with that in sales to actually understand and sort of get away from this random acts of doing things. So yeah, at the time, it was a new role, it was a new challenge, it was sort of something new new for the organization. So there’s a lot of latitude to sort of decide the path forward. Nowadays, I think somebody coming into it has a much more defined about what we’re going to do and how we’re going to do it. And that’s early days, when he sort of says, suddenly says, Go Go do something, then you can sort of kind of set the agenda as long as there’s sort of, there’s a plan and some purpose behind it.

Rebecca Bell
Yeah. Fantastic. And as a as a host of these types of conversations, and you know, in some of the stuff that I I do, I mean, I learned so much about this industry, and you just talked about sort of bringing a process mindset and almost learning what enablement was by doing but through that process lens. So I mean, it seems to me that you kind of spend the last 11 years learning how to be the kind of consummate professional not without, not without relevant experience, but without actually having done that before. in its entirety. What are some of the most interesting Things that you’ve kind of learned from others doing this type of work as the host of this podcast.

Dr. Jeremy Noad
Yeah, that’s really I was really fortunate to have some, some really good people who kind of go the time to sort of have the conversation. And I think that is a good reflection of this a holy name and sort of society, his people are not competing over this sort of happy to share. And so we have this sort of much more of a community side rather than competing impossibly in sales. Slightly more close, because we are Germanic either we are clearly competitors. And we want to achieve certain things. But I think the enablement society that the church should be named once, as it were, is much broader, much more sharing. But I think, some fantastic conversations, and I just thought about, you know, start with conversations with James paling. And James is a sales trainer for a software company. And he talks about the seven minute briefing. And this is an idea that they kind of lifted from research and reviewing things like the FBI do, which was, you know, the attention spans nowadays are so, so minimal. And so it’s sort of idea of, you know, get to the point, instill the knowledge and get out the way and let people get on. And so this whole idea was seven, seven minute briefing, it kind of forces you to stick on topic. And it kind of forces you to really work on clarifying the message upfront. So whilst it’s only seven minutes for the audience, it might be amount of work in the background. But I think that was really good. And it’s sort of expands on the way it resonated to me is, again, you may not watch this, but American football, they have this before they make each play, they have this group chat this huddle. Yeah. And the quarterback says, Oh, yeah, we’re gonna go, we’re gonna do this, which means you’re gonna do that, you’re gonna do that, you’re gonna do that. Let’s go do it. And it’s that sort of idea of rapidly imparting the just in time information. Yeah, I think makes a difference.

Rebecca Bell
I love that. And, you know, I’m trying to do something similar at the moment, which is, I think, the many companies trying to have this kind of they have this insistence that everything has to take an hour, right? Yeah. You know, this kind of increments of time, that has to be neat and tidy, if I were going to do internal webinars can be an hour, right? Why an hour? I if I’m a if, if I’m a generalist, salesperson, I don’t need to know the nuts and bolts of absolutely everything here. I just need to know the conversation, that message clarity that you just mentioned, I hate the whole nine yards. I mean, please don’t don’t clutter my brain with that stuff. And that’s

Dr. Jeremy Noad
it. I think that was the beauty when I say I’m trying to do I mean, yeah, I’ve done different things based on the conversations I’ve had. But it’s the idea that, yeah, they will send out all the background stuff, and all the wonderful theory and all the background, but actually just take away these important things. So yeah, I’ve switched my calendar to 10 minute increments, I’m not going to fully lumbus but you know, 10 minute increments, I sort of have these calls with people for 10 minutes now. And they’re quite surprised when we get done in 10 minutes rather than sort of normally default is half an hour or an hour.

Rebecca Bell
Yeah, that’s a that’s a good way of thinking, even just about how you manage your time, not even just how you try and impart learning, I love that I’m going to try the same.

Dr. Jeremy Noad
I think the other one of the other ones was was Dr. Mark holyoake. I’m known him for a very long time. I knew him before he’s a doctor, I was the piece on trust. And I think there’s a lot of good stuff. But I think the key takeaway is in any role in your life, Trust is everything. And even in today’s sort of interesting times, trust is still freely given at the start, we’re still sort of eroding the approach, I want to talk to you about this and the one that I’ll trust you. But if you don’t maintain that sort of effort of continuing to build trust and keep the trust, then it’s easily lost, and then it’s downhill rapidly. And I think those are still the key things of that. And I think, you know, particularly for the enablement side sort of groups where we sort of say, Okay, yeah, I’ve seen that I’ve looked, I’ve spoken externally, I’m part of this society, I’ve seen a way of doing things. I want to bring this into my organization. If you haven’t built the trust with the the hierarchy above you getting traction to make a change can be a challenge. And I think there’s a couple of basic lessons about how to sort of build your trust as you go along. But I think it’s Really useful for people?

Rebecca Bell
Great well, and of course, you can go to the trust enablement website.

Dr. Jeremy Noad
Sorry, yeah.

Rebecca Bell
And see all the bad conversations that you’ve had. So I think those, those two would definitely be worth a listen, I’m certainly gonna go and listen back. I love that thinking. And, you know, I think, I guess, the collaborators onto something with naming this, this community in this body of content is trust enablement.

Dr. Jeremy Noad
So just couple one more just to pick out I think, when I spoke to Claire school, bringing back the 8020. And I think that’s, that’s key for people in these roles, which are sort of international, Emir, or global. Let’s get it all 100%, perfection, let’s get it to 80% and then give the country or the sales team, that space of the final 20 20%, which will make it theirs, and therefore we’ll get better engagement and hopefully get better results. And I think that was right. And the one that I thought was the most dramatic for me, from a sales background, was talking with Ben Gaston, and we’re talking about the fact we moved to virtual, everything’s virtual. I think about it sort of 18 months ago, as a salesperson, you’d go out, you go out and every so often your sales manager would come and lurk in the background of all your meetings with your customers, and your customers confused about why they were there. And then they can sort of stop themselves from butting in and trying to save the day, I’ll do whatever sales managers do. And he said, Actually, we looked at this and thought, okay, we’re all on zoom calls. Nobody cares, only people on a zoom call. So what they started to do was record the zoom calls with the customers with a sales manager in there, and then use that for the coaching. And I thought I was really quite intense as well.

Rebecca Bell
Yeah, absolutely. It it’s sort of almost democratizes the meeting, doesn’t it? As long as you know, when to shut up, I guess. And and just, you know, let them do their thing. Without without intervening at that moment, then it is a teachable moment afterwards.

Dr. Jeremy Noad
Yeah. And I think they said they literally that say hi at the start, and then they go on mute, maybe turn the camera off and just sit there sit on their hands, and then the output.

Rebecca Bell
Yeah. Okay. So So, um, you talked about lots of good, interesting practice there, and some of the stuff that is definitely on my mind right now. And what do you think are some of the hottest trends? I mean, you you have these conversations, you’re obviously extremely well plugged in, and in all sorts of thinking, what do you think are the two or three hottest trends that no professional should be paying attention to right now.

Unknown Speaker
So

Dr. Jeremy Noad
when you think about the hottest trends, and it could be a product of age, but some of the trends, I’m thinking I’m more concerned about them positive? And I think it’s, it’s, yeah, I was looking at my calendar the other day, and I had sort of six, six calls in a week with AI vendors. And I think AI is absolutely immense. And I think this artificial intelligence, machine learning is really good. But what I’m finding or thinking is, is it’s very fragmented and obese, kind of kind of got an AI solution. And it’s a bit like that the other point, which is, if you’ve got a solution to fixing one thing. And the problem with that is generally you get into then thinking about you, you in starting your second order thinking you think, well, I fix out, what’s it going to break further down the line? And therefore, what are we going to need to fix them? And I think it’s sort of AI is definitely a trend. And I think, at the moment, it’s still at the stage where a lot of things are offering intelligence without action, clearly sort of saying, okay, we can we can crunch these numbers, we can do some rule based processing to identify certain things. But the action that we want to take is out there. So we think about AI, I want to sort of, I want the AI to help guide me to a certain point where I make a choice and take an action. And the focus on these perfection models, you know, we will have this thing and if everything works perfectly, we will get this decision and you go and talk to an executive, hey, fantastic. I don’t need to have people worrying about that anymore. Whereas actually, it really all you want to do is to be a trusted friend. You want it to get to a point where it can offer you some insights or suggest the way. So I think that again, comes back to the 8020 of it is we kind of want to move away from this idea of AI being the perfect solution for everything. But it’s a way of helping us make better decisions or focusing on the right things and I think too much. It’s big package about, it’s going to fix everything perfectly immediately.

Rebecca Bell
And also, you know, although you may be recommending the next best action to take or whatever that might be, your salesperson still got to take the action. So it’s not going to, you know, it doesn’t take away the human element to selling, you know, all it’s taking away some of the computation, the brain power to suggest what should I be doing next? Or, you know, am I focusing on the best things for right now? It’s you still have the sales expertise required? Absolutely. To deliver on that or against that so nicely. to the to the science, I guess it’s again, nation, isn’t it?

Dr. Jeremy Noad
It’s that combination. And it’s, it’s, it’s, it’s true, I always reminds me of a cartoon, and I’ll do my best to describe it. But it’s a little cartoon. And it basically says, you know, the scientists have discovered a way to bring back the dinosaurs. And the humanities graduates have have explained to them why that’s a bad idea. You know, is that, is that balanced? Have you got to have this humanity side, as well as the science side? Or the data side of it to bring it together? Yeah. Yeah, the thing. Again, obviously, the digitalization is is is the other one of the other massive trends, which I think is quite common. But again, I think, you know, when you sort of go back to when I sort of started, you kind of had, you could fit the digital solutions at the software solutions. on a page, you know, you might have had 50 100, things you’d expect to see SAP, Salesforce, Microsoft Dynamics, those and a few other things there. I think the last looks, there’s a lady whose name escapes me Does this sort of map every year, yeah, of all the different things. And now it’s sort of broken down. And now there seems to be 110 categories of automation. And there’s probably 110 providers in each of those categories. And it’s also very micro. And it goes back to and I think the challenge for me, and well, how I want to look at it is I’m thinking that the CRM is the heartbeat, not a control mechanism, but the heartbeat of what we do as a sales organization. And we need to keep that in mind. Data is the oxygen. But all these other applications, these other tasks that aren’t so by the CRM, or that’s pricing, the contracting, the the analytics need to run out from that heartbeat. And I think we’ve got lots of micro things that have a very good story, and a perfect solution for that one problem. And so the people always say, Oh, you need to specialize and find your niche. But some of these niches are becoming sort of like, you know, if I need to use 10 different tools to do something, that’s not going to work. It’s not going to help in any way, right?

Rebecca Bell
I mean, that’s a strong bit of feedback that I always hear from sales like, Oh, my God, not another tool, don’t me have to learn where to go or keep that in mind. I just want to know that it’s the launchpad is is the familiar tool, the consuming application is where I spend my time. I don’t want 15 of them.

Dr. Jeremy Noad
Yeah, exactly. And I think the biggest one, the lesson from the pandemic for me, as very much been about bringing sort of humanity back into business. we’ve, we’ve seen the cats, we’ve seen the babies, we’ve seen the network fails, the camera Finnick out, you know, you’re on mute and all that sort of good stuff. But it’s actually sort of made people more human about business, I think we’ve sort of stripped away some of the sort of the formal, you know, suits of armor that we’re all pros, and we live by whiteboards and iPads and doing various things. And I think that sort of brought to mind sort of, we need to do a little bit more about mindset, and sort of having a growth mindset. Yeah. I think the resilience shown by so many people over the year, also well over a year now has been absolutely immense. Yeah, and everybody sort of really trying circumstances. This sort of video remote world has given people insights into that, but people aren’t being able to sort of move forward, keep going, maybe achieve new and different things is reflected with the sort of mindset that we need to have. So it’s not about we have we have a job to do, we must go and do it. It’s about we have a job to do. We choose to do it exceptionally well and trying to how we sort of build our capability, how we build sort of the thinking patterns, to help people recognize that you know, the job is to be done. But how can we coach you better? How can we sort of help you understand more about the mindset of your customers, and therefore you can understand how what you need to be doing. So I think it’s brought the people skills, and the sort of people aspects of everything much more into focus. Whereas everything sort of always talks about people are our most important part. But you know, actions and words, sometimes had a disconnect. And I think that sort of, for the enablement teams, it’s so yeah, we’re doing training. But yeah, if you’re training on skills and how to do things, that’s fine. But how are we going to train them to sort of respond to people? How are we going to sort of get emotional intelligence across there, those sorts of things, I think, are more key now, after, you know, we’ve gone through this sort of quite seismic sort of change across the globe.

Rebecca Bell
And I love that, I love that. And I think you’re so right. I mean, I do think that suit of armor you disc, you discuss something, I hate wearing business suits, I hate wearing, I’m not very formal, I lead with personality, I hope I bring value to the people I work with, of course, but and that doesn’t make me any less professional. So in a way i’m i’m very, I’m very pleased that some of the changes have been made, because it feels like, you know, long overdue, really focusing on the quality of the work and the interaction rather than the, you know, that that how, how good your hair looks or something. And I agree that it therefore moves you into a more a more around where the humanity of what we do matters more. And I mean, I think enablement is such an interesting part of that, because we are dealing so much with the human, we are dealing with process, we’re dealing with performance, we’re dealing with numbers, we’re dealing with operations, we’re dealing with content, we’re dealing with what moves you is such a kind of melting pot, isn’t it? And I guess that’s one of the reasons why I like working in this area, because it’s it’s a constant challenge. But yeah, dialing up that human base, I think is is a lovely observation.

Dr. Jeremy Noad
And I think that’s kind of where we are with this name and piece about what’s important what it what’s exciting is it is actually got very high potential. And I’ve noticed, if not a closed shop, and I don’t mean that in a horrible sense, but, you know, most people if they’re looking for a salesperson, so go, Oh, yeah, we need five years experience of sales. I mean, even worse, sales enablement, isn’t that well defined, and you got, you’re not going to find many people with five years, 10 years experience. And so it’s not a closed shop. And that is its real advantage, because that gives you the opportunity to bring in the diversity bring in the the different backgrounds that will help us solve the problems we have in new ways. Yeah. If you know, if you only got a hammer, associate is the hammer. Everything’s a nail. Yeah. But these different backgrounds, hey, char psychology, data analytics, digital, yeah, selling. Yeah, but coaching skills, those sorts of things blended together, gives us an opportunity to truly sort of enable people and sort of say, okay, it’s not just about this process of selling, it’s about enabling people to be successful, they are successful, the company is successful, etc, etc. So yeah, so I think it’s sort of it’s continuing to make sure it pushes on from, you know, just being a relate relabeling of sales effectiveness, which is very much focused on reporting and training, to more sort of continue to push the boundaries to think about it in terms of Yes, we need the systems and tools. Yes, we need the processes, but we need to enable the people in the organization. And I think that’s, that’s where we get to.

Rebecca Bell
Lovely, great. So my final question to you, after a while it’s been a great conversation, at least from my perspective, is you have the opportunity to host a fictional dinner party since you and three other sales enablement, interested people, they may not even be people who are doing it, but they are contributing to it. Who would you invite? There you think the audience for today’s podcast would learn most from or would get them thinking?

Dr. Jeremy Noad
Okay, so, um, interesting one, in terms of a three people’s a lot. And so the one I’d start with is somebody I’ve only sort of met virtually in the past six, eight weeks. Larry long Jr. Went to Calculus based in the USA, his passion for sales, his insights, his enthusiasm is absolutely immense. He basically brings joy to the room, even if he’s talking about, you know, the fact that, you know, prospecting is is very frustrating. But he has this. And I’m there to say it’s an American ability, but he has this passion. And this passion is infectious. And I think, yeah, he might, he doesn’t set out. He’s not a motivational person. He’s not one of these sorts of people. But he motivates you through his knowledge and his his passion and his way of explaining things, quite simply. I mean, second, I think

Dr. Jeremy Noad
so it lady I kinda know ever so slightly. And that’s probably my focus, I know, the making of traffic to connect. But if somebody I follow on LinkedIn promotes a lot of good around sales, nomen sales, sales itself, and very much big on diversity and inclusiveness. And that’s a lady called Tyler rule, who’s over at Adobe, very knowledgeable, provides great content and ideas and sort of shared things on LinkedIn. So we don’t take it out you from what, we have a mutual acquaintance in private life that we I wasn’t aware of until recently, but we don’t live that far away, either. But I think I should connect with more properly, but really insightful, and great explaining things. And then tricky one. I was thinking about sales now. And I think I’d probably actually have to have more people because I think one of the people is a lady called Tanya spear. She’s based up in Finland. But her understanding about sales metrics, and making them understandable for people and making them actionable is is truly, truly an he has helped me a lot on just trying to make things. Yeah, because he do reporting and everything’s reporting and the dashboards and things like that. And it’s like, I always go for the CIO, what, and she actually helps define the CIO, what and that sort of thing. So I think, and then lastly, I’d probably go for Aaron Evans, you know, are in the, you know, why wouldn’t you? You know, he spends a huge amount of time sharing content, sharing knowledge, sharing skills, and I think he’s been an absolute star and a credit to the sales professional sending over the past 12 months by his generosity, but of trying to help everybody through sharing the knowledge. So I mean, we got to pick his brain if nothing else.

Rebecca Bell
Yeah, no, I definitely take on our own. Love, love. his contribution, as he says is huge. And I learned a lot from listening to him. So those names again, Larry long Jr. Tara roll, Tanya’s failure. Aaron Evans are Jeremy’s top dinner guests for talking about all elements of sales enablement, so good people to follow good people to connect with. Glad to

Dr. Jeremy Noad
get that number round the table, obviously yourself.

Rebecca Bell
Oh, thank you. I get I get, I get a meal. Thank you. Very good, have you? Well, Jeremy, thank you. What a great conversation. I’ve enjoyed it hugely. And I wanted to thank you on behalf of this community for all you’ve done, setting this up hosting this podcast and, you know, continue to contribute such a great amount of experience and thinking and I hope that I successfully take the baton forward as the host of this for this podcast. So thank you so much for joining me today. Really appreciate it.

Dr. Jeremy Noad
Yeah, thank you, Rebecca. It’s been really enjoyable. And I know you’ll be fabulous.

Rebecca Bell
Thank you. Well, folks, I’m aiming to do one of these perhaps one a month. If you are interested in joining me as a guest, you’ve got something interesting to say or share on sales enablement. Just drop me a line and connect with me on LinkedIn or, or otherwise, send a carrier pigeon, and we will have a conversation and I’ll host you as an upcoming guest. So thanks once again to Jeremy. He may go and retire his microphone, and I’ll see you all next time. Thank you.