Team of One – The life of the Solo Enablement Professional

Devon McDermott is the VP, Enablement & Learning and Development at Persado. In this conversation with The Collaborator, Devon shared her insights on Enablement as a team of one.

Some amazing insights around topics such as:

1️⃣Tips for interviewing for Enablement roles for teams of one.

2️⃣Insights for getting started with Enablement as the team of one.

3️⃣The importance of educating the team around you about what Enablement does, and does not, do.  

Remember, even if you are a team of one, you are not alone on this journey.

Give a listen and remain curious.

Audio Transcript

Unknown Speaker
I’m here today with Devin MC Dermott. Devin, how are you?

Devon McDermott
I am doing great. I’m super excited to be here. It’s awesome.

The Collaborator
excited to have you here. I was telling Devin, before I got on, I got my first COVID shot, feeling really happy about that. It both means that I’m old because it hasn’t yet open to everybody in my state. But it also means it’s a little bit of a benefit. So I’m excited about that. And you were saying you moved. You moved someplace brand new since we last chatted?

Devon McDermott
Yes, I’m in Palm Springs now, which is wild, everyone that I talked to is like get ready, it’s gonna be 120 degrees. And don’t know that I’m prepared for that yet. But so far, it’s a gorgeous day. So I can complain.

The Collaborator
I don’t want 120. But I will take something higher than 45 or 50 that I’m living right now. Oh, my goodness, I would trade that. Now. Tell us them while you start to drink water. And I really feel the question that you tell us all

Devon McDermott
about yourself. Oh, my goodness. So I will try to keep this brief. But

The Collaborator
37 minutes later, we’re looking at the watchman, okay, that’s

Devon McDermott
clearly likes to talk about yourself. No. So a little bit about me, I’ve been in the enablement world in some way, shape, or form for a good part of my career, as I think many of us, I started in project management and training segwayed from there into sales, productivity for sales and customer success with the Salesforce Marketing Cloud, which was incredible. I had exposure to some super seasoned top notch sales reps there. And I learned so so much about selling and SAS. After that I had a chance to build out enablement programs from the ground up with companies like social code. And then I found what I call my dream role, because it’s where I truly got to build out. You know what I mean? I think we all have that idea. Yeah. And so I got to build out sales enablement from scratch at sail through, kicked off that program was running it for quite a while. And then we saw so much success that I took on the customer success enablement function, which I know is a hot topic these days and all of our enablement groups. But for the first few years, I was there as a team of one. I got really lucky, though, because I had an amazing like, one of the best teams I’ve ever worked with of sales leaders, who wound up becoming my mentors and my partners. And many years later, thankfully, got to build out an incredible enablement team, which they’ve signed on and helped to support that vision and strategy, which was game changing, as I think we all know, right? I’m right now though, I am the VP of enablement and l&d at a company called pasado. So I don’t know, john, if you’re familiar with pasado, tell us

Unknown Speaker
tell us Oh, yes, auto does?

Devon McDermott
Well, I’ll tell you, we just put our new Sam team through the elevator pitch exercise, so I’ve been perfecting mine. Nice. So pasado is an AI copywriting technology that actually uses machine learning and human beings as well as our in house language knowledge base to make our customers marketing messages. Really cool, incredibly persuasive and effective. Ai work.

Unknown Speaker
Oh my god, that sounds so freakin cool. It’s super cool. Yeah.

Devon McDermott
And I literally get to work with geniuses who have, you know, multiple math degrees and are just such incredible people. I do not have multiple math degrees, I failed college algebra. So I just like I hope that like I learned from osmosis, because they’re just incredible. Um, anyway, so I started at pasado. As a team of one, I started right at the beginning of COVID. So I started working remotely right out of the gate. I did, I was very lucky again, I had great cross functional partners and sneeze. And in the last, like, without that, it’s it’s a struggle. And I know we’re going to talk more about that in a little bit. But I’m in the past two months, though, I have to celebrate my incredible new team. So I added two new folks to build out our team, and to really take our strategy and all of our programs to the next level. So we brought on a sales enablement manager and a customer success enablement manager to own those two functions. And it’s, as we said, like, it’s been game changing. That’s awesome. That’s one other note about me. And again, like, I think we’re about 45 minutes in at this point, but I’m,

Unknown Speaker
like, I can talk

Devon McDermott
and deal with it. No, just, um, but I’m also a Golden Girls super fan. So I know john, you know, this,

The Collaborator
I was gonna hit you up on this at some point along the way, I was gonna go give you a severe reference or something.

Devon McDermott
I’m ready. Um, and we will talk more about the Golden Girls. But, um, yeah, in general. I’m just I’m so thrilled to be here. And this community, as you know, is incredible. And I’m so thrilled to be able to share my perspective and to continue to learn from everyone who you bring on. So that’s so awesome.

The Collaborator
Nothing really is now. Picture this Sicily 1927. No, I don’t know, I couldn’t do it as well as as Devon can. Tell me, why do you think there are so many enablement teams of one though? Let’s dive right into that. Why? Why is that the case?

Devon McDermott
Yeah. So, as I just shared, I have been an enablement team of one a number of times. So this topic is near and dear to my heart, but in my opinion, and we can dig into this companies and leaders, they’ll see like little nuggets of goodness from folks who are leaning into enablement in, I guess, like in a more limited capacity, right, or a side project. So let’s say we have a sales director, you know, Jane Doe, got her colleagues up to speed on new messaging. Great. She did it as a side project, it was successful surface level, right. And I think the assumption is, well, we can totally just bring in a junior team member to own that full time. Easy enough. But what’s happening there? And I think Easy peasy. Yeah, yeah. And I think we see this a lot. They’re saying, okay, everyone’s delivering the message. But we’re not thinking about what’s the long term business impact? How are customers responding? How are we integrating technology? How do we want to track success of this? And then a big one, that’s super important to me, because I lean in on the l&d side, as well as team development and growth. Are we tracking these competency developments? Are people able to level up because of how we’re empowering them? So I think often and again, I’m making a pretty broad assumption. But leaders are thinking about short term problem solving, and they’re addressing surface level challenges.

Unknown Speaker
I think, you know, I

The Collaborator
think you’re right, yeah. 100%. If somebody is out there listening right now, who’s who’s interviewing for work? And there’s a lot of jobs out there right now. And it’s a team of one, they’re going to be the first enabler. What advice would you came down? You know, you’ve been through this a few times, what advice would you give them?

Devon McDermott
I love this question. And so because I think we’re like, we’re all like just looking thinking back on it all these different job interviews, but no, so I don’t think I have an exhaustive answer. And I’d love to hear the community input here at some point as well. But I’ve interviewed for a number of enablement roles. And I’ve also advised folks embarking on these types of interviews. So what I’m going to do is I like to think of like, what are the watch out questions, and then some thoughts on how you can, you know, teach, tailor, take control, take control of the process, and kind of run it in a way that makes you feel really comfortable about what you’re about to jump into? So watch out question number one. I’m going to be like a different person now. So well, to start watching the

Unknown Speaker
personality,

Devon McDermott
it’s gonna be just listen, I was a former theater kid, the poor people that I support here at persada. Like, they’re like, yes, we know, Devin,

The Collaborator
I could never tell. I could never tell.

Devon McDermott
Like, I want to do a poll, how many enablers are like former theater kids? You know, anyway? Um, so the quite you know, to start, we’re going to, you know, just have you joined as a team of one, and then we’ll see how things go. If things go, well, we’ll open up the budget, what can you do on your own? So this one I get all the time. And I think all of us have gotten this question it probably every job interview even if you are joining a full team. And this makes me laugh, because and john, tell me if you feel the same way. But what other role at any company? Do you expect to be a magic bullet, right? So the enablement, we expect you to be a strategist, a collaborator, a builder, a coach, a metrics expert, a trainer, and a million other things that I have, I’m not thinking about right now. And I’m laughing at it because well, that’s ridiculous. But I know that most of us who’ve been a team of one have also done it. We’ve done it all successfully. So Exactly, yeah. Like,

The Collaborator
what are the job? Do you get interview for where they really don’t know what the job is?

Devon McDermott
Well, that is also like, like, you’re constantly educating people about what you’re doing and how you do it. But But what I like about that question is, I always ask for more. So like, again, thinking in the context of sales, discovery will tell me more what like, what do you mean about that? Or give me some definitive timing? What is the roadmap for growth? What does success look like to you? What is your plan to grow our program? Right? And so kind of put it back on them to say, you’re having me come in, I have to prove myself right away. What does that actually mean to you? And then I also love to ask every person I interview with, like, Why are you bringing enablement into the organization to really get a sense of where they’re at? Like, is it one of those people? You know, that think like, yeah, we know we need it or like, Yeah, well, they get they’ll just come in to do some training. So really, just get them to dig in a little bit more.

Unknown Speaker
Um, dude, that’s so

The Collaborator
smart. No other two points alone are super smart, but continue to please.

Devon McDermott
Well, the other thing and I think as enablers like as I’ve gotten further into my career, I just have this like slide available now. But when I advise people on interviewing or when I interview, I always like to come to the table and say, here’s what’s possible with just me. Just me and no budget, here’s what we’ll get. Here’s what’s possible with me and a budget, here’s what’s possible with me the budget and the tech stack that actually support the program. And then the final one is, here’s how things really take off when we have all of that and a team. And I think that’s where they’re like, oh, okay, um, in some cases, in some cases, they’re like, Yeah, no, it’s still just you. It’s okay. So, yeah,

The Collaborator
I think I think it’s so good. And you alluded to this, but you didn’t necessarily say it explicitly. you’re interviewing them as much as they’re interviewing you and never lose sight of that. Because you do not want to

The Collaborator
feel like my network froze. I’m sorry.

Unknown Speaker
And I was

Unknown Speaker
what I know,

The Collaborator
you don’t want to walk into a job where they have no clue what to expect from you what they want you to do. Even you’re setting yourself up for failure from the beginning. So, so, so important, and I love your your thinking there, Devon? Yeah. Tell me you walked in as a team of one, you’ve had this grand vision in your head? How do people? How do people pull the Devin off? Or the Sophia Blanche? Or, you know, whichever, and walk in and get started on the right foot?

Devon McDermott
Yeah, well, we all know that Dorothy is the one who built a charter. Right? She was the teacher. So she was super organized. I, Dorothy,

Unknown Speaker
that was

Devon McDermott
she I mean, she has a plan, right? So obviously, I think like, if you google where to get started with enablement, all of the the videos, the conferences, the TED Talks, build a charter, right? Even if it’s super basic to start, what are your goals? What are your objectives? Who are your stakeholders, key initiatives sign off. And then, of course, socialize that with your manager and cross functional leaders, I do want to mention, and I couldn’t find it when I went to look for it the other day. But john, I, you had some great thought leadership on your sight on this topic. Yeah. And again, there’s tons of resources out there as well. There’s great templates. And there’s even videos of people talking through their charter process, which is game changing. So again, establish your goals, objectives, key players and everything in between. and make sure you socialize that with leadership and cross functional partners. So

The Collaborator
smart. And you’re right, shame on me, because I do have guides on how to get started on how to build a charter and all that stuff. So shame on me for not making it easier to find,

Devon McDermott
well, no, I, cuz I saw it on on on your site. And then I was like, Oh, let me see, like exactly what was in there. But but if that’s your your best starting point, the other thing? Yeah, we got to find that. Um, but the other thing that I think is key, and it’s a few things, actually. So yeah, you need to establish your baseline of core processes and operating models. And I know, you know, some people call it their blueprint, I call it my enablement game plan. So with the charter and this game plan, which I’ll talk about in a second, but the goal is to ensure that you don’t get sucked into those random projects, right? Or that you don’t get sucked into a leaders shiny object syndrome, which I think a lot of leaders have, like, we got to do this, we got to do that. When you have,

The Collaborator
the higher up in the organization they are the bigger the shiny objects, and the more frequently they see them.

Devon McDermott
It’s why. And so now you have the tools to say, remember what we discussed, and here are the implications if we follow that that sparkle, right? And listen, I have a charter, I have my enablement gameplan. I have all of this, and I still get sucked into it. Because you’re like, Can I really say no to my CEO? Sometimes Yes, you can if you want to grow the business, if you want to have an impact. The other thing and you kind of mentioned this before, john, but we need to teach people how to work with enablement. So not only educating them on what enablement is and the scope of our work, but how we can partner together. And what I like to offer in my little game plan is like different flavors of enablement for various initiatives. So are we simply Yeah, like, and I actually had a conversation with my CFO this morning, like, Is this just an information session? Or do we need a significant behavior change? Is this something that’s brand new to the whole organization, and not just the selling or customer success organization? And when I try to explain to folks and I feel like I don’t know, you know, I feel like people can relate to this. What it truly takes to enable on a topic, not just do a training, the response is often Oh my god, this is so much process. This is too hard. Can we just do a training and my favorite, which I’m gonna like, put up on a sign with like an X through it on my wall is Devin, people are so much smarter than you think. And they’re just gonna get it. And I’m like, Oh my god, no, they won’t. building that repeatable Consistent behavior takes so much more effort than people are willing to admit.

The Collaborator
And it’s not a matter of being smart Devin. Yeah, I mean, it doesn’t matter the fact that he as humans, we’re gonna forget 90% of what we hear now, in 30 days. Yep. I don’t care if you’re Einstein, or PV Herman, or anywhere in between that, I mean, it’s simply the matter. That’s the reality. It’s

Devon McDermott
so so true. And it takes time, right. And I think that’s what people don’t want to hear. You we are hiring, we are hiring amazing people at persada. We hired amazing people at sail through just because they were amazing in one role and knew how to sell and do exactly what we wanted at one company doesn’t mean that’s going to translate here. So we need to give them the time, the space, the reinforcement and the coaching to get there.

The Collaborator
Yeah, yeah, I want to I want to stand up on my whatever. And just shout to the stars. Yes.

Devon McDermott
Yeah. And so very briefly, because I think this is important too. And this does take time. But you can do this in your first 30 6090 days, as you’re ramping into your enablement role is build the game plan, right? Make sure you have a plan for each level of enablement are different types of projects. And what I’ve done with with my game plan, is I put it into one slide, so that when I’m meeting with an exec or someone who has a short attention span, they can see the highlights the logic, impact and lift of each approach. And they can basically choose their menu item, right. And so, as I mentioned that I try to keep it at four different levels. So there is a fifth level as well, which we won’t get into. But, but it helps like we do standard intake. So, um, what is the business objectives, timeline teams impacted resources, we need roles of the manager, things of that nature. And so we have all that mapped. And then again, we can make the the appropriate selection. And when we get a request from leadership or the exact team, we do the scoping questions, and we make a recommendation. Now, I think even as I’m hearing myself explain it, it feels like a lot, right. But the planning on our end as enablers is a lot. This should feel super easy. For anyone that we’re sharing it with, like you said, that’s

The Collaborator
what I’m hearing you say is you’re doing the hard work behind the scenes so that it’s fairly easy for the people requesting your support.

Devon McDermott
Yep. Because they feel like enablement is heavy, like a heavy lift anyway. So we want it to feel like super simple. These are the results you want. This is the path we take, right. And the best part I have to say about using this approach is that we have the receipts now so like let’s say, Mrs. crmo, wants to do a medic qualification launch. That’s a big one, right? I’m going to suggest the level for 90 days manager coaching guides, reinforcement plan, Salesforce updates, you name it. CRM says people are smarter than you think let’s do a level two, great, we’re not going to see the results. We want to see if we rush this right. So I can now say, here’s what we recommended. Here’s what we delivered. And here’s why we’re not meeting the appropriate expectations.

Unknown Speaker
So

The Collaborator
often do you hear after the fact? Do you ever hear after the fact? Okay, Devin, you’re right, we should have for probably two or three and we meet in the middle? You know, how does that conversation go?

Devon McDermott
Usually it comes about in a roundabout way where we’re not actually admitting that we were not correct in our initial assessment. But what winds up happening is we have to do it again. And I make a very big deal about if we did this right the first time, we could have saved some time. And there’s a whole Golden Girls analogy I can share with you, but I will reserve that for another day. But anyway, God,

The Collaborator
oh my God, you have girls and girl analogies for everything. I know this.

Unknown Speaker
I do.

Devon McDermott
Again, we’ll be here all day. So I will save that for another conversation.

The Collaborator
I lock and I apologize if I’m not pronouncing your name right lock a lock a sub Romagna said, Hey, Devin, how do you build a sales enablement team? And, you know, what are the five things you do for it? And I think, if I’m reading it right, and maybe you know how to interpret, but I’m really hearing sort of building off of the question. We’ve already started with you getting started. You’re thinking about actually hiring and building up the team? Maybe I let us know. I like that. That’s not what you’re you’re thinking in terms of what are the first five things you do? And I know we talked about charters, and we talked about game plans? Are there other sorts of things that that you would recommend team of one or otherwise? Well, let’s stick with a team of one theme that you

Devon McDermott
Yeah, so it’s, we can continue that list that I just shared. I think, again, the charter is first establishing our processes is key as well. And then part of this game plan and it makes it really easy to plug in a team is I also build out or built out project plans for each level of enablement. So like The project plan is ready to go. If we decide to level two, obviously, we can tweak it not everything fits perfectly into those buckets. Yeah. But I build out the project plans. I’ll even build out again, your first 90 days is quite a bit of time. Yes, you’re doing discovery. But you can start to build out some of these processes and the operating model while in advance. Even things like onboarding, ever boarding webinar cadence, I try to establish the foundation for all of that, how do we want to run webinars? What is our cadence? How do we want to involve sneeze and I’ll start to document those processes. Again, as the team lead, I’m generally running point on strategy, right. So I try to define as much of that is possible. So that when I do want to bring in somebody to manage a dedicated function, like onboarding, or if I want to bring on a customer success, enablement manager, they can plug in to the process that already exists. And of course, I like to hire very smart people, people that are much smarter than me, have them come in and help to iterate on those processes, but they have the foundation that they need to kind of hit the ground running, start scheduling down, call review, start getting our steering success sessions on the books, and then we can iterate as we go. So I’m all about laying the foundation, not just for the enablement program, but also ensuring that the foundation is set for our sales team for our customer success team, ensuring we have the right processes the right sales for setup the right technology. So again, we can just plug in on key revenue generating initiatives as quickly as possible. That’s awesome. Devin,

The Collaborator
that’s awesome. Everybody out there listening right now is thinking, How much money do I need to get Devon to convince her to come work over here? That’s what everybody’s thinking right? Now. Let me like, nobody ever has a completely smooth road down this path called enablement or anything in life? What are some of the gotchas or things or challenges to look out for? If you’re starting as a team of one? Yeah, that you’ve seen?

Devon McDermott
I think it’s a few things really. And I will say, I’m not immune to these, especially starting a brand new enablement function at a company at the start of COVID. When the whole world was flipped upside down, everyone was freaking out just in general not not, you know, just at my company. And I am very methodical and thoughtful. And I like to, again, lay my foundation create my processes, I didn’t have that opportunity, because we were reacting to a world that was changing really, really fast, right? And so I couldn’t say, Hey, everybody, stop what you’re doing. Because the shiny object syndrome hold a little bit more weight at that point, right? It’s true. So I was like, Okay, I’m going to just kind of jump into some of these key projects while in the background, working on my process and plan and communicating that back to leadership. So I’ll start with one of the biggest challenges being those random acts of training and enablement that gets thrown at you. Because you’re expected to be productive so quickly, and you as a team of one, you’re like, I got to prove my ROI, I got to prove my value here, right away. And if they don’t see me taking on these projects and working, they’re gonna think I’m just twiddling my thumbs, which we know is not the case. Right. So I think those you know, getting pulled into those random acts of training and enablement. That’s a huge challenge for teams of one and even think teams, I think.

Unknown Speaker
Yeah, I agree.

Devon McDermott
Yeah, and I think the perception to that we mentioned of being that magic bullet, that’s gonna solve everyone’s problems, while enablement is here now. So I’ve actually heard this at every company that I work for, which is, hey, this thing isn’t going well. And they will make can totally fix it. We just got to get some enablement in there, enablement, okay. Or this thing isn’t going well. It’s definitely enablement fault. This is because enablement isn’t working. And I’m like, which one is it? It’s barely either of those, right?

The Collaborator
We don’t really understand this. So whether it’s good or bad enablement.

Devon McDermott
And I hear it thrown around. And sometimes it’s like, do I unmute my line and say, like, but the real issue is, or, but, but it’s definitely a challenge. And I think, again, those first, those first few things that I just mentioned, I tend to put that team of one into a situation where now you’re starting to do things out of scope, because you take on that one project, that one, you know, just do a training, you start to take that on. And now it blurs the line even further of what enablement is for the folks who really don’t get it. And so then you wind up, you’re pulled into all these projects, you’re running these trainings and coaching and you don’t get the opportunity that we just talked about to build out that fully fleshed out enablement plan. And actually, you mentioned something before that I think is super important, which is another challenge, I guess, constantly having to explain what enablement is and isn’t. Because that line is blurred. And I wound up just putting together like a five slide deck, what enablement is, what it isn’t how we can help the organization. I share that quarterly at any company that I worked at to say like just a reminder, here’s what we do. Here’s what we’ve accomplished, all socialized that was my quarterly charter as well just to keep reminding people of what we do, but

The Collaborator
I like that I like that a lot. Do you think do you think that that Kind of cadence is the right cadence for for, for most people to consider. Hey, guys, Hey everybody, here’s what we do. Because when we don’t do it, because that’s so smart.

Devon McDermott
Yeah, well, I think for some it might feel like overkill. So I try to like, keep my sensors out for the triggers of when I need to do that, like getting pulled into certain projects. I’m being asked, you know, why didn’t enablement fix this problem? And that’s when I’m like, Okay, it’s time to do a quick refresher. And I try to make it super productive. Listen, my goal is to help grow our company as well. So I always want to help. But I also want to make sure that we’re not getting pulled into things that are going to take away from true productivity, true business impact. So use your discretion, I’ll say like, you don’t want to every quarter be like, Hey, guys, enablement here, here’s what we’re not going to do for you. Position it in a thoughtful way. And I trust all of the enablers out there have the skill and ability to do that.

The Collaborator
Well, you know, what i’m gonna i’m, as people know, you and I chat or prepare questions ahead of time. And I’m going to skip on you right now. Because you just took me someplace. And we’re 25 minutes in, geez,

Unknown Speaker
we

The Collaborator
could talk for three days. Let me say this to you, what you talked about the skills. And sometimes as a team of one, you feel you feel like you don’t have anybody who you can learn from or get support from. And I think the enablement community is wonderful. If you know where to reach out to, what recommendations would you have for people that are setting here as a team of one trying to grow and learn and just build up their skills?

Devon McDermott
Yeah, I love this question. Because I love this community. And when I first started in what I didn’t realize was enablement. There wasn’t a lot out there. And it was, it was there, it was hard to find. And I think at this point in time, like enablement, is exploding in the best way possible. So there are so many amazing groups, books, thought leadership, I mean, this, this, this session alone, is incredibly valuable, all of the resources that you share, Donen that you continue to share on LinkedIn, on your site, read them, they’re amazing. But also during the sales enablement, society, sales enablement collective sign up for the sales enablement collective at de has been one of my favorites for years, because I come from that training world. And then the enablement squad slack group, which I think it started fairly recently. But what an amazing what an amazing forum and group of people. And I know I mentioned this before, but every person that I’ve met in who’s in some sort of an enablement role is so open, and so willing to share and share their insights. And, you know, I go to as many enablement conferences as I can, and in person, it’s a little bit easier to network and build those relationships. But every person I’ve encountered at a conference, every person that I’ve met on a panel that I’ve spoken on, has been more than willing to get on a call with me to talk through a challenge I’m having or a deck that they want feedback on or I want feedback on. Most of those folks are willing to share templates of their approach resources, and talking through, you know, issues and the challenges that we just talked about. And we know there are a lot of challenges. And I’ll say, too, I’m always willing to jump on a call with someone reach out to me on LinkedIn, I have done this to other people. I just kicked off medic in my organization, and I started stalking people who are medic expert, help me. And people are willing to do that. So don’t be shy. I am. You wouldn’t know it. But I’m sitting alone in a room. I’m an extreme introvert. I’m super shy. I early in my career would never just reach out to someone on LinkedIn and ask for help. My advice to this group, even if you are terrified and shy, do it. There are just a ton of experts waiting to help you.

Unknown Speaker
It’s incredible,

The Collaborator
such great advice, because I don’t think I’ve ever encountered anybody in our community enablement broadly, who isn’t willing to have a conversation, have a chat, and weigh in and try to be supportive? It’s a very giving community of people. And that’s part of the appeal of it.

Devon McDermott
It’s amazing. I mean, like, I’ll ask someone a question. I’m like, Oh, is this like, you know, not like, should I know the answer? No, no one expects you to know the answer. And there’s always someone willing to just walk you through it take the time. We all have such different experiences. And we use this, you know, blanket term enablement, which I mean, as a community, we’re still arguing about the definition of that. So like it’s okay to have questions about the answer. Um, I’m never like, don’t be shy. You are not expected to know anything. If you’ve been enabling for 10 years and you’ve never built a charter reach out to someone. There are so many incredible people and resources. So I’ll say like as an introvert and a very shy person, just go for it. We will help you.

The Collaborator
If you send Devon DVDs or whatever of the Golden Girl she’ll answer any question you are ready

Unknown Speaker
for life. friends for life, friends,

Devon McDermott
don’t take much I will say I got an amazing outreach from a BDR. And now I can’t remember the company where he took all of the various sales technology and aligned it to each golden girl. And it was thoughtful and well researched. And I shared it with my team. And I took the call, even though we didn’t need the tech, because I was like, Oh my God, this person, like spent the time it was I

The Collaborator
know, if somebody goes that far, you’re just like, I gotta talk to you. And I’ve done that, too, when I’ve been like, I’m not buying anything. Yeah, but I gotta tell you, it was really special the way you did

Devon McDermott
that. Yes. And I’m like, I know your company has call recording. So I’m gonna say this, so your manager can hear it? Because you weren’t right.

Unknown Speaker
That’s awesome. Well, let

The Collaborator
me ask you this. We’re 29 minutes in. We didn’t cover a half of what we had on our list. But I’m not surprised by that. Oh, my God, what is there one or two things that you like, I want to share this, I do want to ask you to come back. And we’ll keep talking about all these amazing things. But is there anything you want to share before we before we come to an end today?

Devon McDermott
I mean, I’ve shared quite a bit, but I will say like, I’m just gonna reiterate the point I just shared. If you have questions, if you need support, and you’re alone, in an enablement function, reach out to an expert, join one of the groups, because I’ve been there sitting alone in a conference room, like I don’t know what to do. I’m stuck. And I was hired to be this expert. And I’m freaking out. And that is the worst feeling in the world. Because we are expected to do it all. We are expected to be the magic bullet. And you are not alone. You are not on an island. You have a community use it, use it.

The Collaborator
wonderfully said. And Devin is a great representative of all that is good about the neighborhood community. And anybody honestly, who’s come on this show has been phenomenal, terribly, terribly wonderful. And that sounds backwards, but there’s just a wonderful community. Taking advantage of that. Reach out to Devin, if you have questions. I am going to ask Devon to come back. Because she’s phenomenal. Devin, thank you so much. And thank you everybody for listening in. No thank you. Alright,

Unknown Speaker
bye bye all.

Unknown Speaker
Thank you.