In this session, Chuck Marcouiller joins The Collaborator to take us on a look at Enablement and the buyer journey, how aligning our efforts with the customer truly creates a roadmap for positive, measurable, change.

There is a ton of insight from Chuck in this conversation, here is just a highlight on how you map go-to-market and Enablement activities to the buyer journey:

  • Start by really looking at how you are getting your customers.  Are they coming to you as inbound or is the vast majority coming from outbound?
  • Inbound means they were researching you and have begun the learning journey for their own reasons
  • Outbound means you are sparking an interest and need to do more education and early buyer teaching.
  • Each has a set of skills and tools the sellers will need to diagnose and build trust with the buyer
  • All along the way are we co creating a solution for the buyer that they have had a stake in building or is all the world a nail because all we have is a hammer
  • Everything from your website and data sheets have to work with the seller to be consistent and build trust.
  • How they come to you determines what they want when they do get to you.

Give a listen and remain curious.

In this session, Chuck Marcouiller take us on a look at Enablement and the buyer journey, how aligning our efforts with the customer truly creates a roadmap for positive, measurable, change. Click To Tweet
Audio Transcript

Unknown Speaker
did it wrong,

Chuck Marcouiller
you’re close enough, you’re within your within a band of tolerance.

The Collaborator
I’m within a little bit of tolerance there. Hey, everybody, I’m here with Chuck and Chuck was here, geez two or three weeks ago, and talked about an amazing topic. And he told me at that time, that hey, I have yet another amazing topic. This one we’re gonna be talking about is how to align your enablement along the buyer journey. And we could spend weeks talking about it. And I expect one day you’ll see Chuck’s on $1 bill, when he actually cracks the code. And he’s making money hand over fist by by what you’ve come up with. But for now, Chuck, do me a favor. Take us through who you are, again, for anybody who missed the last episode. And we’ll just start there.

Chuck Marcouiller
Well, john, my name is Chuck Mark coulier. I am the Senior Director of revenue enablement at job bite. And my background is I’ve spent the last 20 plus years old enough to have a little little gray in the beard, working from the very large companies like ADP, to the medium sized companies like avalara and Smartsheet to smaller cut size companies like reflective and I would say medium to small job like right now. But my the the continuity between what I’ve been doing is sales, sales, leadership, and now, revenue and sales enablement, has really been in the tech sector and software as a service. So my passion is really around around that, you know, helping companies get the technologies that they need in business to business.

The Collaborator
I love them, man. Let me just tell him you buddy, Bob, Apollo threw in some f Forrest Gump references.

Unknown Speaker
Let’s say,

The Collaborator
well, along the lines of awesome is is awesome does

Unknown Speaker
I think

The Collaborator
you have a fan with with him. Hey, let’s dive right into a chart. Why do we want to map out our enablement efforts against the buyer journey? You know, why does that matter? And why is this something that you’re so friggin passionate about?

Chuck Marcouiller
You know, I’m passionate about this. It’s really funny. Because whenever I start a course with salespeople, I often ask the question, I go, you know, john, Hey, tell me, do you enjoy as a buyer? Do you enjoy buying from salespeople, and I’ll get a room of anywhere from five to 10 to 15. Salespeople, I’ll say raise their hand, guess how many people sellers, professional sellers, people who are dedicated to making their living, selling, like buying from salespeople?

Unknown Speaker
None of them?

Unknown Speaker
None of them?

Unknown Speaker
Why? Why?

Chuck Marcouiller
Because no one likes it. But everybody likes to buy. Yet here these people are we’re gonna make our career selling. But we turn our brains off when it comes to actually doing the job. You know, everyone likes to buy, but no one likes to be sold. And the thing is, is that, you know, in today’s world, you know, and I’ve watched the sales process and the buying process change in business to business over the past 20 years, and it really has changed a lot with the advent of the Internet, and how much is out there in the speed of technology, I mean, how cheap it is to copy, you know, what, what our competitors have, and it’s almost become, you know, commoditized, almost anything that we do, there’s at least one or two competitors who can match our capabilities. And so, you know, it’s, it’s changed to the point now, where it’s, you know, what is what is the role of the salesperson, and, you know, before it was, hey, let’s get good quality information to buyers, if they just knew what we could do, then they’d want to buy, think about how we, as people buy now, john, you know, as individual consumers,

The Collaborator
I don’t want to talk to anybody on the phone or in person, unless it’s pain of death that I’m about to make a horrible decision to talk to

Unknown Speaker
people.

Chuck Marcouiller
But that’s the thing, you know, and in order to be successful in this role is sales, we’ve got to really tune into, you know, what, what does the buyer want? And I love psychology, I’ve always been fascinated by psychology, what do we do? And why do we do it? And, you know, my journey with the buyers journey started about in 1997, you know, with Kevin Davis’s, you know, seminal work, you know, getting inside your customers head, and then, you know, the challenger came out and they talked about how, why b2b companies you know, there’s that famous graph that 53% of the bike, you know, why companies buy from another company is not necessarily price which is 9% or 19% based upon brand or 19% based upon the product it was really based upon, you know, the sales experience and and what they went back and looked at that about Bryan Adams and in their research was, it wasn’t based upon the buyers product knowledge, I mean, that the sellers product knowledge, it was about them, creating value in how to go about by, you know, tell me something that, you know, helped me avoid, avoid pitfalls. And landmines and all the other things and make it easy to be something.

The Collaborator
Exactly, yeah.

Chuck Marcouiller
And so so think about how that’s that’s continue to change. Gartner has been doing more research on that. And I love what Gartner has been doing that and then winning by design. Jocko Vander cap is doing more research on this. And so I keep seeing this continue to build and build out there. And it really makes a lot of sense when you think about it. In that, what is it today that our modern buyer, because great information is out there, we’ve got g two, we’ve got all of the review sites, we’ve got our own our website, everybody’s got a website that’s got great, fantastic information out there. You got easy Google search. So what is a buyer want now? In order to be able to buy from a company? What are they looking for from a seller?

Unknown Speaker
Well, I

Unknown Speaker
know the answer. Yeah, I know

Unknown Speaker
what,

The Collaborator
we’re gonna move inside, they want some guidance, they want some trusted advice they want to me, those are all buzzwords, I know. But when I talk to a seller, I want them to teach me something I don’t know, that I haven’t found on another website that tells me I’m making a good decision

Chuck Marcouiller
or a bad one. And there’s a lot of high quality information out there and teach me something that I didn’t know. And I think it’s I think it’s harder and harder to find or teach them something that they can’t easily find on a website. Because there’s a lot of information out there. Yeah, it’s so true. It’s crazy. I think there are two things I think Gartner hits on this very, very well, when they sit there and say what they’re looking for two things when they talk to a seller. Number one, they’re trying to figure out, can you help me clarify or cut through the clutter of all of this high quality information and make it simple for me to understand? And two? Can you help me put trust into you and into your company that you’re the right one? Because there’s always two buying decisions that are going on? At any given time? What is it that I want? And who do I want it from? What is it that I want? And who do I want it from? So I’m trying to, you know, go through the whole process is, is this something that I want to need? And if I do, who is the right provider for that wanted me? Okay,

The Collaborator
yeah, really, really spot on I in my brain, I was going back and forth. And thinking there was a third one, do I even want to solve the problem in the first place? But I think that’s implicitly included in those other Yeah. So

Chuck Marcouiller
yeah. So the role for us as sellers and I go back to I was buying a big screen TV, you know, and I was doing a lot of research between Samsung and Sony, when you look at a Samsung and Sony, can you tell the difference in these big screen TVs, you know, the ultra 4k HD TVs? When you look at the wall and Best Buy or any of these stores? Can you even really tell the difference between them? Oh, my God, I

Unknown Speaker
know, I can’t

Chuck Marcouiller
know most most people can’t. And I was I was driving myself crazy with the research, I went to YouTube on which of the review sites I was going to the Samsung I was on the Sony I knew that it narrowed down to the two. And I’ll never forget this experience because I had spent hours of research because I wanted to know if I’m going to spend a lot of time on a big screen TV. I mean a lot of money on a big screen TV, I want to get it right. So I’m standing in front of this wall, and I’m looking back and forth in this Best Buy guy comes up to me and he goes, trying to figure things out. I said, Yeah, he said, I’ve got two questions for you. And I go, you know, now color me curious. Being a sales guy. I go, Yeah, all right. He goes, What are you going to watch? And how bright is your room? And I was like, What do you mean? He goes, Well, really, when you look at these TVs, you really can’t tell the difference. Because the pixelation, the color, and all the other things, they pretty much work the same. But the only thing that you really need to understand at the very high end of TVs is what are you going to watch? And how bright is your room?

The Collaborator
And I go, why do you select the difference between sports speeds? or something else?

Chuck Marcouiller
Like No, no, it was it was even simpler than that. He goes on for a second. And the story goes, he goes Sony is a movie studio. So they create their TVs to be the blackest blacks, and everything to sound in order to show to optimize movies. So if you’re going to watch movies, and you’re in a dark room go Sony. Samsung knows that they’re not a TV studio, I mean a movie studio, so they create everything for sitcoms, because they, they gave the movies over to Sony. So they’re much brighter and work better in a brighter room and the sound is a little different and to the sitcom. So if you watch sitcoms in a bright room, go Samsung. If you’re in a dark room, and you watch love movies go Sony. And he turned around, never

The Collaborator
gonna see. And you’re never gonna see that on any website from one of those manufacturers.

Chuck Marcouiller
No, because they’re all gonna say that they can do everything for everyone.

Unknown Speaker
Yeah, exactly.

Chuck Marcouiller
And so that’s what it’s all about. I mean, for me, the buyers journey and that’s the key for us as sales is really figuring out how do we cut through the clutter of all the information. Because one thing that I’m seeing over and over again, is that we as buyers, we we researched about four or five different sources of information, high quality, good information, in any buyers journey that we do. And so we’re looking for someone who can help them validate the research that we’re doing and cut through the cut through the clutter. And help us figure out which of the points of all of this information that we have out there. Make sense? So when we look at enablement, you know, taking it down into the company side, we’re within enablement have to understand what is the buyers journey in there? And how do we create that? You know, what are you going to watch? And how bright is your room kind of question that cuts through all of that clutter? And our salespeople to really do you know, to ask that key kind of question, so that we can connect with the buyer, because there’s really three things that we’re trying to do. Right? We’re trying to connect, we’re trying to clarify. And then we’re trying to collaborate, connect, clarify and collaborate. I’m a simple guy, everything good comes with three, right?

The Collaborator
I like they started with the same letter to it made my life a lot easier to remember, because I’m a simple guy to chuck. See, Chuck said, communicate, collaborate and

Chuck Marcouiller
clarify exact clarify first. Yeah, you know, the first thing that we do is we connect with them. Because in the sales process, we got to, we got to, you know, get on the same side and be human with them. And then we got to clarify, how do we clarify, you know, what’s going on all of that information out there? and really get to the heart of the nugget to add value? You know, are we creating the discovery process to listen to understand, to really pay attention? Or to give back information? Or are we just trying to, you know, become a automated version of our website. So many times, I listened to sellers and I listened to calls. And we feel like, hey, if we can get a live human being, I’ve just got to give as much information as possible to them. And then they’re gonna choose to do business with me, because I gave them so much information, why would they go anywhere else? There’s no value to the information that the seller gave. So why you know, and it just confused the hell out of them.

The Collaborator
Let me ask you this, Chuck, how do you go about, you know, when I think about the buyer journey, and I love everything you said, so far, when I think about the buyer journey, if I’m going into buy TV, you’re right, I’ve done five or six piece bits of research of competitors, I’ve done this and that I go in, and I just want somebody to tell me that a or b question, when we amplify this up, or when we take it to the b2b side, with more people involved in the buying decision. Price is much more complex. Sometimes he information is even more confusing and harder to identify and isolate. To clarify and all of that, how do you map the buyer journey in a way that’s actually meaningful? For b2b?

Chuck Marcouiller
I think that that’s the next thing that you got to do is go into the collaborate. Number one, we know we’re the experts on our product. And we know how most people buy our product or service. And you’ve got to understand is it an inbound motion? Or is an outbound motion? You know, if you’re new and selling a new kind of technology, it’s gonna be an outbound motion, so you’re gonna have to do more education, because any buyer goes through three distinct steps. There’s the awareness, there’s the education, and then there’s the selection. What is this thing? Then the education? Well, alright, now that I know what it is, does it have any meaning to me? What do I want in it? What are my criteria about it? And then how am I going to go about buying it? How am I going to go about acquiring it? So we edge you know, there’s two learning steps before there really is a sale step. And so what we have to do is we have to look at our whole process and our sales process. Because so many times we’ve we’ve created a sales process to optimize the throughput to make it as efficient as possible to identify buyers, and to shorten the sales cycle, maximize the arr and get them through over to implementation.

The Collaborator
And we want it to be this perfect straight line from discovery to sign that

Chuck Marcouiller
Yeah, when in reality, what we’ve got to do is we’ve got to diagnose you know, prescription without diagnosis is malpractice. You know, as much as in sales as it is in medicine that and and what we have to do is we have to figure out create space within our processes to diagnose with because we want to collaborate no one wants to be sold to you know, when you ask sellers, why do you not like working with salespeople because they’re pushy, and they’re rude and it’s their agenda. And you know, they’re well meaning product pushers reeking of commission bread. They’re just trying to get me to the next step or trick me into something. Yeah, exactly. We can all feel that. But when we find someone who’s genuine and human and listening to us, and collaborating with us, then what we do is they slow down and they understand where we are. If we identify a seller’s and build through our process to understand where is the buyer within their buying process, are they learning or are they trying to select and then helping them collaborating with them to give them what they need at that point within the process. Boy, now, you had value. I know you’re interesting.

The Collaborator
I agree with you so much shopping. It’s interesting. I had a conversation with somebody yesterday. And I still contend that many sellers and many businesses, while we say the buyers in control, it’s still in our dance of sales, we’re trying to wrestle that control back, as opposed to collaborating and let the buyer go through their journey. We’re trying to wrestle it back. Is that part of the education that enablement? Does as we map things to the buyer journey in your mind? It’s sort of that mental shift or my overblowing, your thoughts? Oh,

Chuck Marcouiller
no, I think I think the best sellers that I have ever worked with, and while I was at ADP, I had the wonderful opportunity to go out and study some of our, you know, million dollar producers that the average person was producing in the mid market in the five to 600,000 range, but there was always this elite group of sellers in the top, you know, two to 5%. were selling a million and a half and above. Yeah, and it was, you know, go find out what these people are doing and see if we can rinse, wash and repeat. And one of the things that I found with these elite sellers and talking to them, was that, you know, they number one, they were very disciplined in their process. They did things consistently. But their intention was they always came sort of with a servant’s intention. And they weren’t with the biggest markets. You know, it wasn’t New York City, downtown Chicago and the rest. It was Denver. It was Austin. It was, you know, Seattle, it was some of the, you know, good sized markets were not the hugest, yeah, but they were ones where they they had a system, you know, a systematic process of playing the long game of creating relationships with people and adding value at the human level first, and then the product would follow. And so, you know, that was the key is to is to really sit there and figure out, you know, what am I doing to add value? How am I connecting with these people? And then how do I have a process that adds value to them as a person first and then as a product? Second?

The Collaborator
I love it. But, but I got to ask you this, Chuck, I’m going way off course. So I apologize, man. And I apologize to all of our listeners, because Chuck has three days worth of content to share. And we have 2530 minutes to get it all in so so I apologize for

Unknown Speaker
going off track.

The Collaborator
One of the things that I worry about Chuck, and I’m curious to hear your thoughts on it is can we teach the entire sales team to be empathetic to be collaborative to lead with a servant’s heart to reuse your own phrase there? When we’re living in a world where it’s like, well, your forecast says you’re going to hit 10 million this quarter.

Unknown Speaker
What the hell are you doing?

The Collaborator
How do we balance that pressure in this context of trying to map to the buyer journey and educating everybody? How can we balance that need?

Unknown Speaker
Well, I,

Chuck Marcouiller
you know, we absolutely can. And predictive? I

Unknown Speaker
agree, I think we can. Yeah, absolutely

Chuck Marcouiller
can and I think what you do is you you know, the buyers journey is if you route a sales process, and there is a there’s an art and a science, I would agree that there is a science to the sale, in the sense that you can map out your buyers journey and you can listen for there’s there’s Okay, if they say this, they’re going in this direction. If they say this, they’re going in that direction. Yeah. And and you map out the stages of your sales process to be able to say, okay, we’re advancing to this stage, if they are truly in a selection process, and you validate them, but through the process, you can get them there through co creating using tools like mutual action plans, or go live plans. You can use, you know, deal rep processes along the way to validate Do we have the right information? Have we found out? Are they truly in this area? What is their decision criteria? So if you know one of the things that I teach and work with newer salespeople in is to really listen to the words that they’re saying, not just what they’re saying, but how are they saying it so when I if I asked you, you know, Hey, tell me about the next vacation you want to go on when you’ve got your shot and COVID is up. Tell me where you’re gonna go. And if you sat there and said I don’t know sunny, warm you know, a hotel, guess what, you’re not actively thinking about going in, but if you ask me, I’m telling you, I’m going to Cabo Zul hotel you know the the Cowboys Hotel in Cabo. I want a two bedroom, you know, on the fourth floor on up, I’m gonna be there for five days, you know, and you know, I know my criteria down and that saying, guess what, Chuck’s into buying I’m just waiting for, you know, everybody to get the shot. And, you know, we’re both really loud

The Collaborator
about it. You planned out all these you’ve thought about it to the nth degree and you have our markdown in your head.

Chuck Marcouiller
That’s a weak point. So we can listen to the language and we can build those checkpoints within our sales process so that we do have that consistent for castable say And we know what’s going to happen if they are, if they truly are ready to buy, they are going to act and behave in this way. It doesn’t have to be, you know, kombucha and Kumbaya, you know, kind of stuff. As you know, it doesn’t have to be this really, really soft skill. But you know, we, we build these things in to say, hey, it starts off with the intent of we are there to facilitate the buying process, we’re there to play the long game, and create customers for life and build our brand of service to the customer. But we do that by having the discipline of a process and checkpoints within a process to really listen to what they’re saying. Because if they truly do want to go to Cabo with Zul, you know, and on this specific date, they will give you the information to do that. If they’re just sort of like sunny and warm back by November, they’re in a learning, just give them the basic information. And you know, you put them in the long call marketing drip, and when they’re ready, then they’ll get back to you. Does that make sense? Yeah, no, it

The Collaborator
makes perfect sense to me. And I was gonna ask you, I know, I’m a big believer a building in whether it’s medic or some other process directly into your CRM into your training. So people understand how to use it to gather the right questions. Is, is that part of what you recommend teams do? Oh,

Unknown Speaker
yeah, absolutely. I mean,

The Collaborator
does it go further to Yeah,

Chuck Marcouiller
I’m a big fan of the medic deal rip process. And so one of the things that we do a job right that we built in, you know, when I came on board that we we brought into the the discipline the processes, we have the stages of the sales process, but we use the medic formula. And, and we’ve tuned it to our specific the nature of the our buyer, and, you know, the metrics, and you know, the economic buyer, the decision criteria, the paper process,

Unknown Speaker
we’ve kept, we’ve taken

Chuck Marcouiller
the shell of medic, we’ve tuned it to job bite, which is specific to ours. And we did the same thing when I was at reflective, and we did the same thing, you know, at other employers. And we said, okay, because of these things, now, here are the things that we should be listening for. And here are good indications. So if, for example, they don’t know what their metrics are, well, that’s a good thing, or they’re not Oh, we don’t measure? Well, that’s a good indication, this hasn’t gone up to anybody who has the ability to actually put significant money towards this. Exactly. So we got to help them with that. So here’s an alternative to roads, here’s here’s a, we’re gonna go point A, or we’re gonna go to point B. And you you build those things in, and then you get a, you know, later on within the journey, you get a goal I plan or a map process where you say, okay, john, let’s sit down, we now gotten to the point, let’s co create the steps that you’re going to have to go through because in talent acquisition, oftentimes, we’re dealing with a buyer who really hasn’t bought a lot of technology. So they appreciate the process of understanding how do we get from my concept of what you’re seeing right now seller, to the benefit of going live? And how are you going to? How do we build trust that what we as sellers are telling them the truth, and that they can trust us, because that’s a big distinguishing factor. A lot of we lose to no decision by I’m overwhelmed by information. And I don’t know if I can trust any of the sellers to actually get me to that that new position, because so many times we say, Hey, you got a problem, I got a solution. You connect the dots. I’m running away. Just sign

The Collaborator
up. And I was gonna ask you about that, Chuck. Because, you know, I don’t know what the latest research shows, but I think it’s still around 50% of deals are lost to no decision, because we’re doing such a poor job of getting them through those hurdles. How does enablement map, you know, along the buyer journey to discover those places where the no decisions typically occur? To reduce the likelihood of that?

Chuck Marcouiller
I think that’s one of those things where we have to constantly tune I think that part of the key is, is to really understand that that sales is not in a vacuum that really starts with marketing in the website, and that it goes from marketing and the website, where does this information, high quality information start? And then how does that transition over to the SDR team in the initial contact and outreach to then get put into the hands of the account executive who does the discovery call? Who then transitions over to the implementation person and from that implementation person over to CES to then go to the account manager on the ongoing basis for that recurring revenue?

The Collaborator
I mean, every checkpoint we throw shit out, we just start over again. Shock Yeah, we start discovery we make it miserable for the customer. Too many customers too many companies do that. That’s the only reason I’ve done that crap out. Please continue because you were saying something

Chuck Marcouiller
smart. Because it’s it’s that piece that we’ve got to understand we build that brand I and I love David Auric You know, one of the deans of the the School of Business and Michigan When he says, you know, brand is the image in the mind of the best customer made real by your people in your products every day. You know, with products being a commodity these days, your brand is really made real by your people, you know, you probably have a favorite airline.

Unknown Speaker
Right? Yeah.

Chuck Marcouiller
And your favorite airline is not based, they probably all I live in Seattle, so Boeing, everybody flies, Boeing planes and Airbus planes, there’s two choices. And so whether it’s united or delta, or Alaska or Southwest, they all fly the same doggone planes. The difference between them is a service that they’ve people provide. And so we’ve got understand, even though we may have a technology, and I’m in the tech tech area that we sell, the difference between, you know, one company versus the other, really is the experience that they’re going to have from the time that they get on the website and the continuity, can I trust you and your company. And if I could trust you and your company, I’m going to continue with the relationship. But if I can’t trust you and your company, if I feel like somewhere along the way, this is fishy, I’m bugging out, I’m going to the next person, because the switching costs now is no longer the barrier to entry.

The Collaborator
And that’s so smart. And that’s so smart, and so dead on and research shows it I mean, these days, customer experience is the number one decision point, overpriced for who customers go with. And it’s all about to your point, that consistent quality experience that they know they can trust and count upon working with you. And we’re all have short memories, about the good stuff. But it’s one bad experience that takes place that we all remember loud and clear. So we have to do everything we can to prevent that. Let me ask you this, Chuck, you said something that I thought was so important. It’s from the beginning of the journey all the way through. So how do we as enablement professionals, as SL, go to market business professionals drive that collaboration internally, first and foremost, so that we deliver these great things?

Chuck Marcouiller
And I think one of the things that we’re seeing is that you know that the profession as a whole is moving from just pure sales enablement to now really looking at this as revenue enablement. And, you know, looking at the whole revenue journey and saying everything, where do we start at within the revenue journey? from marketing side?

Unknown Speaker
lets me

The Collaborator
know, okay, I wasn’t sure if it was me or you, Chuck, I’ll send you frozen. And I’m like, well, that’s a lovely thinking face.

Chuck Marcouiller
Oh, it wasn’t your wasn’t made? Because

The Collaborator
it probably was me. You know, I was just asking you. Oh, yeah, I was just asking, how do we drive that cross functional collaboration and make it all happen?

Chuck Marcouiller
And I think the cross functional collaboration happens when we move from sales enablement to revenue enablement, where we really look at all of the aspects of the revenue journey, to make sure that there’s continuity of it and we take ownership, you know, sales, revenue, operations and revenue enablement. And we say, Okay, is there consistency across the message across the skills and across the tools that we’re using for continuity? And we don’t, that we don’t create the Kansas landscape, but one beautiful silo after the other.

The Collaborator
It isn’t beautiful silo.

Chuck Marcouiller
It gorgeous.

The Collaborator
Let me ask you this, because because I want to be sensitive to time chalk. Yeah. And I don’t want you to spill everything you’re going to write in this long book that’s going to go on sale next month, at Barnes and Noble or wherever you buy your favorite box? Um, what are the typical challenges you’ve seen? You know, as we go through this journey of really getting people aware of the buyer journey, educated about it, and really adding value to our customers lives. What are the typical challenges you’ve seen?

Chuck Marcouiller
The the typical challenge that I always encounter is that’s not the way we do it. Here. It’s, it’s, it’s the momentum of we’ve always done it this way. It’s the momentum. And you know, we’ve always done solution sales meeting, we’ve always gone the old school way of doing we have the sales funnel, you know, the imagery of a funnel, do you know when that first came into sales, I love that.

Unknown Speaker
I don’t remember when was the Chuck 1890s. Yet we remember where it originated. Now, I remember that I look at it,

Chuck Marcouiller
but it’s other things where we’re sitting there and we saying, okay, we’ve always done it, and I see this where you roll out a concept. And salespeople are like, Oh, yeah, this is great sales training, and then they go back to the cube in the day pre COVID. And they turn to their, you know, the one person who is, you know, seems to be executing and they go, Is this how you do it? They go now scrap, scrap that stuff. This is how we do it here. And then they go back and they do whatever it was. Yeah, you know, I mean, heck, if Ford can make it And electric Mustang, then we can figure out a way to, you know, engineer a process for the modern era. And that’s, it’s, it’s all about changing, you’ve got to have from leadership on down, you have to commit to, we’re going to create and inspect the process to ensure we’re executing in a way that enhances the buyers journey. It’s an intelity. That’s a huge point,

The Collaborator
the leaders street leadership down, Chuck, that’s a huge point.

Chuck Marcouiller
If you don’t, and you don’t look at that across departments, and from the top down, then in a vacuum, it won’t be successful. It can’t be.

The Collaborator
Yeah, I’ve never seen a change of any sort, whether we’re talking about this particular topic or anything else, where if an executive leader wasn’t kicking it down, over and over again, supporting and driving it, that it had any chance of creating lasting change in the business. No, and, and you got to get that.

Chuck Marcouiller
And I’ve been fortunate to work for some really good leaders, and I’m working for an excellent leader right now, who are collaborative will sit there and say, Okay, so what are you trying to do? Why are we trying to do that? And what will the end effect be? And we as enablement, professionals, have to look beyond just, you know, what are we asking the change to be? But what will be the end effect of the change? What What is this supposed to drive? How will we going to measure that? And what what are we going to know? And how will we adapt if this doesn’t work, and I love the leader that I’m working for now. Because he’ll often challenge me, he goes, this is really interesting, Chuck, that’s a good measurement. But what if it doesn’t work, then one?

Unknown Speaker
That’s not me. But

Chuck Marcouiller
now I got to think of that. All right. So we have the right intention. We’re building these things in place. And then we’ve got to have an observation process in order to bring that back and figure out, Okay, how do we tune this on the fly? Because nothing you know, as the great philosopher Mike Tyson, you know, once said, Everybody has a plan until they get hit in the face. So every, every salesperson, you know, will sit there to enablement person says, you know, you’ve got a great strategy until the first sales call. So, you know, wait, do we actually contact the customer?

The Collaborator
You know, Chuck, you, I say this with sincerity, you obviously have a great boss, you’ve got a great approach to enablement overall. And I’m so excited to see what you guys end up doing as a business in the next couple of years. Because I really feel like, you get this stuff really well. And it sounds like you bust us to we’re two minutes over the 30 minute mark, though. So I’m gonna ask you this. Any final thoughts? No, we could talk for another three days, but anything big, they like cheese, I just want to get this across.

Chuck Marcouiller
I think that the big thing for the buyers journey is take the time, listen to your customers, and listen to your sellers on how are they How are you people buying? And then figuring out how do we build into the process, collaborative points in order to bring the this the buyer in, in order to get them on board and feel like they’re part of the decision making process that it’s not, hey, I’m being forced into a solution. But I am helping co create that solution. And I have a voice and I have someone who’s helping me get through. And you know, creating the trust to I can trust the information that I’m getting. I’m getting clarity, the information on you know what this is and how it’s used. And I’m working with a company that’s ethical that has my best interest in mind.

The Collaborator
Fantastic tips, Chuck, and I have to throw this out. Beyond Bob Apollo saying, you know, lots of solid nuggets and advice to you, Luca rasik, or rasik. Yes, Chuck is a great boss. Somebody somebody like to raise somebody’s looking for a raise? He’ll be talking to you soon. Now, this was great, Chuck. And I really can’t say it enough. It’s an amazingly important topic. And and the insight that you’ve shared with us all, I can’t diminish the importance of, but I’ll ask you this, though, if people have follow up, because it is such a huge topic. Yeah. Can they reach out to you on LinkedIn and just add love questions? Yeah,

Chuck Marcouiller
ping me on LinkedIn. Let’s get a discussion going.

The Collaborator
Awesome. Well, Chuck, thank you so much, my friend, you have a great rest of your day, everybody. Thank you for listening. This is a critical topic. And when Chuck comes up with his book, I’m going to be his literary agent. And because I think this is a huge moneymaker, Chuck, Thank you, sir.

Chuck Marcouiller
I appreciate the opportunity to share these thoughts.

The Collaborator
Oh absolutely my friend. Take care. Have a great rest of your day.

 

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