Ashton Williams, Enablement Manager at Ada, rejoins Adriana Romero to catch up on her year of growing Enablement through a global pandemic, taking over responsibility for customer success and evolving beyond sales enablement into revenue enablement.

In addition to covering cross functional collaboration and virtual sales kickoffs, Ashton shared three of the biggest lessons she has learned in the last 12 months.

1️⃣Enablement is not yet at a place where anyone has it all figured out.  Partner with your manager and across the organization.

2️⃣The alignment between product marketing and enablement is critical and something she initially underestimated.

3️⃣Teams can do a lot with just a little.  Don’t try to boil the ocean, crawl, then walk, then run, then fly.  It’s a journey.

Give a listen and remain curious.

Check out our brief guide for information on how to build an enablement organization.

 

Audio Transcript

Adriana Romero
And enablement Canadian version. And today I’m super excited because we have Ashton Williams back because she’s gonna share some great insights with us, Ashton welcome back on the live How are you today?

Unknown Speaker
I’m doing great. Thanks

Unknown Speaker
so much for having me. I’m

Unknown Speaker
thrilled.

Adriana Romero
I love it and we were just chatting about how here in Toronto it’s been you know, it’s been sunny it’s been feeling like spring even though you know there’s some days that been colder and not as nice but it definitely you know, there’s something in the air Right,

Ashton Williams
right. I’m willing it to be spring I just want to go outside without a coke.

Unknown Speaker
That’s my only ask.

Adriana Romero
I you know, every morning when I Buckle my daughter up in the snow pants and the snow jacket and everything I really think like I just need a simple like spring jacket on because this is my hands cannot take it anymore. Stop the armor.

Ashton Williams
Like I just want to not have to wear the armor when I go out for like

Adriana Romero
I have rebelled myself and I have a pair of these. There’s kind of brass sneaker called Bessie and I love because they’re waterproof. So if there’s blush or anything I can I know I can put my feet in because I’m like, I’m done. I don’t want to wear boots anymore. But anyway, talking about spraying and talking about you know, all the things that has happened, because there might be some people that know you assha and know that you’re you know a lot of our followers know you give us you know the roundup of who you are and what you do every day.

Unknown Speaker
Yeah. Hi, everyone.

Ashton Williams
My name is Ashley Williams. I’m the revenue enablement manager at ADA. Ada is an AI platform that supports delivering incredible customer experience at scale. What I do, there is a lot of things. I really take my experience in b2b sales partnerships, customer success, and leadership to align all of the teams break down silos support go to market, and more recently, I’m taking on ambitiously our customer success team in addition to sales enablement,

Adriana Romero
I love that customer success has been especially because some of sex enablement has been top of mind for a lot of companies. And and I think you know, there’s such an integral part of the revenue machine that I think it’s super important, I think this is going to be a great, great challenge for you to take on. So I’m excited to see what you do. So you know, you talking about you know, change of seasons and anniversaries and all those things you just finished your first virtual, you know, kickoff after you already how when was your anniversary of ADA was a January, technically December.

Ashton Williams
So I’m a year and a few months old.

Adriana Romero
Oh, that’s that means you’re like season, that’s okay. So you know, you’re celebrating your anniversary, we’re also celebrating anniversary being in this pandemic, you know, next week, it’s unbelievable. It’s gonna be a year that we were sent to work from home, you did a virtual kickoff, which was I’m pretty sure scary and exciting all at the same time. Tell us about, I want to ask you a two fold question. So we’re going to start about tell us about this year and maturing into this role. And now being able to take on new new things, how’s that.

Ashton Williams
So it will start with the easier one, which is is probably being able to be being able to take on new things. I think it’s always a great side, when your enablement moves from reactive to proactive, you can only take on new things when you start to get there. And so it’s a huge win for me that I can actually step back and go, these are all the other things that I knew were dropping, that I didn’t have time for, because I was run around like a chicken with my head cut off. And I can be proactive about supporting teams. And you know, I share this, like I’ve been in sales a long time. But I started in customer success. That was my first you know, corporate job. And I remember what it was like to be the afterthought when it comes to the training or the rollout, and then to shoulder what it takes to really drive home that value. So I’m really excited to take on this new challenge, it’s gonna be a lot of learning for me, my team is going to teach me a ton, I’m sure. But being able to do more is is super exciting. When I talk about this year, I mean, all the ways that someone can be unsure of themselves and think that they’re not supposed to be doing this job or that they are lost is probably what I can describe for you. But all the ways that community supports are seeing that no one has it figured out, or that we’re all figuring out being at home. All of that has been a whirlwind this year, and I’ve just learned so much if I can say kind of the three top things that I have learned this year that have helped me be successful so far is one. Nobody has the right answer. There’s no black and white or best way to do most things, what works for your organization, you’re going to have to figure out and you’re going to have to do the work and you can’t do it alone. Your managers got to be there with you. Try to do Alone enablement, you usually go downhill pretty quick,

Unknown Speaker
too.

Ashton Williams
I think the alignment between Product Marketing and enablement was something I took for granted when I first started, and honestly, they’re my biggest allies, and I love them and could not do well without them. And so our synergy has been so great for both of us. And three is that teams can do a lot with a little, I think, an enablement, we always want to build out the perfect version, you know that that level five, excellence, like the full onboarding, that’s a LMS, and training and a speech and a test. And, and honestly, like, sometimes, you’re getting ready for that. Sometimes you can’t lift that quickly enough to deliver value. And sometimes your team surprises you with how wonderful they can do with little. And I think those are the three things that really are going to take me into next year with a better mindset.

Adriana Romero
I love that. And it’s funny because I posted about this today about the Yellow Pages. And when you say about doing a lot with a little just reminds me of when you know we used to prospect do using the little things like this, and we didn’t have the fancy tools and enablers or you know, revenue intelligence tools and all these things, we just had a phone and a phonebook and a list, you know, maybe we’re lucky. So I love I love that you post that I love how you’re describing kind of like how you learn to work with your team. And and I want to take a dig into that, you know, you speak about managers and about product marketing. And these are so such big relationships to have in enablement. A because product is, you know, is the people who are basically creating the messaging and what, you know, the the product has to do. But it’s about that synergy of how to translate it into sales and how to help sales understand it right without knowing everything. And then management because they’re the ones who are working with you to help the team. What do you say were the was, you know, that thing that helped you kind of create this great working and learning and kind of failing and learning again, that you feel that now that machine is kind of oiled and working better not.

Ashton Williams
So I’d say first and foremost, I have to say that my time as a sales manager is an education that I don’t know where else I would have gotten that, like I was the manager who didn’t let enablement near my team. I was the manager who was like, I’m not taking off the floor for this, you better show me how it’s gonna work. Even though I was a trainer before I was a manager and so kind of the empathy and understanding of of where managers coming at and and what their goals are. I thankfully had that experience firsthand. But when I say that it’s gotten better, I was actually sharing like, my manager asked me, you know, what are something that you’re proud of this week, and I ran a social styles training for your mid market team. Social styles was probably one of the first things I ever learned in sales in my formal training, you know, I, I take for granted that I’m like, everyone must know this, like a driver or an amiable like, straightforward and, and not revolutionary, but something I use every day when I remember how I’m collaborating or communicating. And I had an individual one on one got to the point where I’ve one on ones with my managers, and I asked them, you know, how’s it going, what are some coaching trends? How’s that working, and we weren’t really in a place that we could have done that when I first started. We’re now at a place where I can meet with them. And like weekly, it’s like this is what’s happening, these are the goals, here’s where we’re at. And I was able to proactively recommend a training and run it for the team timely to something that we’re already working on. That alignment of you can proactively add a tidbit go to market is coming in, it’s actually in line with this whole theme. And my managers are like we’re coaching on this right now. Thank you for being relevant. That is just like the relationship has gone from zero to like what I want on that team, spreading that love and making sure that I’m doing that with every manager, we’re still working to get every team that way. But that was just a huge win. And I think a cornerstone on what good manager and enablement relationship should look like.

Adriana Romero
I love it. And I love it, you you you talk the topic of styles. And this week one of my videos got some feedback, which is great, I love I love when we work with enablers because in the sales process, you get feedback from your prospects that you would not get any other way. And it helps so much. It helps us to understand how people are receiving, you know what we’re doing, it helps the team understand, you know, how they’re doing their job. But one thing of the feedback was, you know, related to a feedback, I think it went to style. And it’s so important to be tuned in to the style of each person and to, to your point, know how to talk with people and know what to coach to without wanting to change their style. And I think that’s, that’s super important that you are tuned in into that and that you learn and you know how to do it with your managers and their teams. And it’s an ability that I think goes beyond just knowing what you know, the best a class program is going to be like and what method knology to do is be a human being and be in touch with the person you have in front of you, right? I

Ashton Williams
think we forget that enablement is still sales. And just because you’re not in front of a prospect does not mean that every second of time you get from someone, you’re not responsible for adding value. And I think I think mostly about my managers where I am stressed if I can’t think about how I’m adding value for them, and sometimes that happens, and I’m like, Oh, I’m asking for a lot. But what am I giving back. And I think this year was one where I was like, I can give something back. And it’s so clear and easy.

Adriana Romero
We’re here, I’m pretty sure they know it. And I know that they’re, you know, they value that so much from you, and all the hard work that you’re putting in I love that you’re in a place where the first year, that’s usually very tough, especially what you were doing, you were building a lot. Now you’re in this position. And now you not only have a good working relationship with your team, you’re in a position that you got to hire, you got to do your first hire. Tell me more about that. Oh,

Ashton Williams
so exciting on so many levels, I think. One, I’m pretty passionate about enablement. I think I’m one of the few that like I chose this, and it’s where I want to stay. It’s where I want to leave my home. And so advocating for it as a career choice. Or as you know, what it can look like I’m thrilled to do, but to be able to expand my team is significant in in a couple ways. One, Ada believes in enablement, right. This is a business that is investing in their team’s success through growing my team. That’s something that I think a lot of enablers have to fight for. And I didn’t. And I have to say that like I was really fortunate that we were like, hey, like, here’s how many people we have. And here’s the things I have to learn. And I’m one person so that and everyone’s like, Oh my gosh, yes, you’re right, we need more of this. And so that is super significant. In general, and then growing my team is exciting, because the way that I’ve divided them is by function. So I’m going to have a sales enablement lead, I’m going to have a customer success enablement lead a partnerships, enablement lead. And so they get to be a team together and support each other, we’re going for that Center of Excellence model. But then be experts in the teams they work with, and really harbor those relationships and be in with those teams and feel like part of them. And oftentimes struggling that you’re on your own team. And you’re also on that team is difficult and can be lonely. So I’m really I’m really excited about that. When we made our first hire on the sales enablement side already, Mitch has joined our team and he’s getting started. And we’re looking for our customer success enabler right now.

Adriana Romero
That’s great. So if you guys were listening, know about anybody who was good and wants to join, you know, ashtons team, by all means connect with Ashton and you know, get it going. You talk about a couple of things that I find very interesting. And it’s the education of you know, how you are lucky you work in a company that believes in enablement. But there’s still so much education to do around the value of enablement, in many companies that I think it’s super important. And that’s a message that would be great to spread, like I think, talking about enablement, not only with enablers but with sales leaders is super important for them to understand this is the value that this role provides. And I think that we’re in that moment in time. And I was talking with my team this week, where I think 2021 is going to be the year where enablement is going to finally have kind of like, okay, you you guys have this line item here in this budget, and we’re gonna see what you guys are doing, and people are gonna finally understand and like, put, you know, click it and say, Oh, yeah, these guys are actually helping us, you know, move the needle in revenue. And I think that is that is super great. And I love that you’re gonna have your little enablement family, because that’s so important.

Ashton Williams
And we excited for having a team just just on our like, personal level, being a team of one is lonely. It is really nice to have someone else be like, Bobby, we’re in a lot of meetings. How do you juggle my prayers? I’m

Adriana Romero
like, I know. To be honest, I remember when I hired my two enablement, hires, and my old and my past role. We became a family like still today we are you know, I’m fortunate that one of them is working with me and the team and it’s separate role, but we’re still together. And my other you know, team member, she’s somewhere else. But we’re still like a family. Every time we see each other. It’s like we’re in this together. And it was fun to have like a team to say, I’m going to meet with my team. So we’re going to be out for two hours. Yeah. Give me such a good feeling.

Ashton Williams
Yeah, something that I think and this is probably another coffee topic is enabling enablers. Oh, yeah. Always, it’s always talked about from this place of like, we’re gonna sell you a course. But nobody talks about it from a place of like, how do you ramp your own hire when you were in chaos before? How do you do that? Right. Like,

Unknown Speaker
I’m figuring it out.

Adriana Romero
It’s funny because I spoke about that with Paul in the sales enablement society podcast. And I was like, Look, I started to write down all the things that I would have want to have as an enabler coming into three different startups where there had been no enablement hire and the things that I learned and how we did it, good, bad and ugly. And then what I did that maybe I should I’ve done better also with my hires, and that I recognize, okay, these are the things that are enabled when hire is going to need. And it’s super important because we don’t think about that that oxygen mask, it’s like, oh, you’re on an April. We’re going to do some training right now. Like, I’m not Yeah. This one.

Ashton Williams
It’s always like you’re here. Are you ready?

Adriana Romero
Like I got you. Yeah, that brings me some flashbacks. But yeah, that’s good. So you, you got your hires, you did everything. One big activity was the virtual kickoff. And, you know, a lot of enablers were times this year of doing virtual kickoffs for the first time. You know, when this is like the time of the year where everybody comes together, everybody’s in person. And you have to kind of build it in a way that it will fit the virtual world. What were the learnings that you had and things that didn’t go as you wanted them to do that you will? Correct? Because your BK was awesome, I am sure. But there’s always that behind the scenes that nobody saw that you were keeping. I’m pretty sure your list of this. I want to change for next time. Tell us a little bit about that.

Ashton Williams
Yeah. So I think I’ll start with this. I think we had about three weeks to plan it. Mainly, we were going to externally get get some support. And then honestly, we just have so much that our product is changing and sexy internally that we would have to build it all anyway. And so it didn’t make sense. But I was kind of riding on the fact that I’d have help. And then they were like, Nah, just you and I’m like,

Unknown Speaker
okay.

Ashton Williams
So I think there’s like three main things that we did that worked well. And one was, we had to decide the goal of kickoff. I think people forget to do that. And it’s so simple, like, is it motivation? Is it collaboration, getting them to talk to each other? Is it actual training and learning and there’s an outcome, similar to how you decide how a meeting should go, your kickoff can’t do everything, it can only do one of like, motivate, educate, inspire, ideally, people leave with a little bit of three. But you’re unless you have a full week kickoff, you’re not going to get all three of those done to the fullest extent. Our kickoff was only two days at two four hour sessions, because I just don’t think that people can handle more than four hours of zoom and lunch is included in that. So it was short. And the goal of our kickoff was really motivation for the year. And at the high level, how are we going to get there? What does that look like and then follow up each team individually to their own kind of mini kickoff for like, tactically how you’re going to be successful in your job. It was our first time having all of revenue. So we had customer success. We had solutions, consulting, partnerships, and sales all in one. And the things that went well, or the little things that made virtual great or something as simple as music that goes such a long way. You know, we had countdown timers with music that people really loved. So they knew when to come back to their desk, we have lots of breaks built in to give people space. And we tried to keep all presentations to 20 minutes or less. So as a presenter, 20 minutes was your max, you had some time for q&a. And then we had a break. And then you went into the next piece. I think it went as well as can be expected people were engaged. The chat was blowing up, you know, we had team awards, of course we had what’s happening, recap all those things that you have in the kayo. But we didn’t have training or like a tactical skill element. And I think that really simplified our kickoff, right, when when you need to teach people things, it’s different. We didn’t have a product launch that was ready to go or new roadmap, we didn’t have all those big pieces that normally would combine that that big enablement with your kickoff. So I’ll say this, like,

Adriana Romero
I got it easy. I think what also I think it’s very important that you knew what the outcome, you know, you wanted from your kickoff, and that is key. And it is okay. If it was you know, motivational, he just gave a you know, push it just got people to I love the awards. I love the whole thing. We all need that. I think it’s important. And I think it goes back to you know, when we were talking about the programs, right? It doesn’t have to be this you know, 150 activity program with three certifications. It doesn’t have to be always like this huge kickoff, as you said, people are so happy with all things and it gives me It gives me this context for motivation conversation. So, you know, I’m gonna have a panel next week where I’m going to talk about what motivates a sales team, especially nowadays, when some companies had to move to a virtual selling that they did not do before, which, you know, many of us in startups we don’t know we usually virtually sell so it’s okay, but there’s a lot of you know, change management and there’s a lot of people feeling they’re anxious because I’m a salesperson know used to go on and have coffees and, and lunches and travel. And it’s difficult, but there’s a there’s a fine line between motivation and company spirit that I think people kind of like mistake one for the other. And how did you define and that point, you know, this is a virtual kayo that I’m going to do with motivation. And I want to bring in Was there anything solid but within all the fun stuff that you guys Did it You said this is important for my managers to know to continue motivating the teams. It was there a little element of something in there that was, you know, around all the fun that you that you gave the team as well. So I’ll say this.

Ashton Williams
There’s definitely learnings where in three weeks, I don’t think I prepared my managers very well. Honestly, I will say that, that the collaborative side of this that could have made it way better, we didn’t have time. And for the next one, which we’re starting to plan now, we will be doing better there are our company vision and mission had just kind of gotten realigned. And so we actually had our CEO speak about our flywheel and how important that’s going to be to the business. And so that’s the thing that we’ve been driving home. Overall, as a company, every managers doing it, they’ve they’ve probably been killed to death with this flywheel notion. But it that’s the thing that’s been the drumbeat. So I’ll say this, I don’t think we had that specific, like, hey, managers, here’s what you’re gonna coach on next. But that’s also because we didn’t have a product launch, we didn’t have a new skill. And all of that is actually coming for our next Kay Oh, my next kayo is heavy training, a lot of launches a lot of new skills and a lot of things that managers will have to carry forward. I think this one was like a primer to reset our year.

Adriana Romero
Yeah, well, you could think you’re gonna have a team to help you and building that. So that’s important. Because it is it is people don’t understand the amount of work I think the last I was, I was lucky, kind of lucky than in my last company, the kickoff was not sales, there was like very different, we had like a kickoff every every month, there was another mode, like SK or virtual hill or anything in that sense. But the one before we remember doing this was an in person, we had sort of a product type of segmentation learning that we got into that. We had some a lot of workshops, you know, ideas, but even planning the social stuff, and even planning the timing of things like people don’t understand how difficult it is sometimes as tierpoint to say, it’s a 20 minute presentation, and then we go on a break, and we come back and how do I fit all this in two days? It’s it’s a skill, you know, I

Ashton Williams
gotta say this, I underestimated the logistics, for sure. Because there are external factors like customer interviews, right? coordinating your customer first is what you have to lock in, and then you can lock in everyone else. And I will say I underestimated so much of those little logistics, but I was like, oh, flow document, sorry, here you go, here’s what it’s gonna look like wrap this up, wrap this up. I think what I would do for future is pre record quite a few sessions. And, and allow them to be live. But the recording that we sublight, like is ready to go right away. So if someone needed to tune out or or missed pieces, we had it there. And I think I would also say, my team loved we did some breakout sessions where we we solutions, you know, challenges we know we’re going to face in the air. And I think that’s the motivation piece where we all got together and go, this is a big year, big goal. What do we think we’re going to face as a company? What do we think we’re going to face as individuals? And how can we better support each other cross functionally, and I had everyone to kind of fill that out. We’ll be reporting back to everyone kind of the things that came out. But those breakout sessions, which I think I always underestimate in any meeting, we forget to make that the priority. We tried to get through all the things then you run out of time, and these breakouts are so short. And those are the things people love. Those are where the great ideas come out of. That’s actually where the motivation, inspiration and collaboration happen. And that’s the thing that I think my learning is we prioritize that those needs to be longer, those have to happen if if a meeting gets cut short, then fine, you missed half your message, we’ll send you a video. But this this team coming together, especially in the virtual space, is so much more important than I think I understood when I started

Adriana Romero
it. That’s a great learning. And I think it’s a great, you know, a great thing to share with everybody who’s watching is to never underestimate the power of these little things. And breakout rooms are so good. And in virtual and in personal. I love those sessions because it gives that intimate feeling. And you you spoke about other things that I really like it’s the anchoring, anchor the things that are going to be the most difficult. And it’s funny, because while you were saying the anchoring the customers that first and then planning reminds me when I planned travel, which Yes, I’m looking forward to do again, I typically tell you know my husband, I’m like, Okay, I’m going to anchor this part of the trip. And when that is said, I will build everything around it. And it applies to everything that you do like what is the most important piece? And then do everything around around that piece correct? For sure prefer so you know what? So now you’re going to be a hiring manager or you are a hiring manager. You’re going to be a you know leading you’re going to be having the center of excellence which I’m super excited to learn, you know how your team is going to grow and evolve. There’s so many new enablement roles out there. I think that between August and right now in March, I have never seen such an uptick in roles specially in enablement in this level, like the amount of things I see in the enablement squad, you know, in the sales enablement collective in the sales enablement society, and you know, the revenue collective. I’m like, how like, this is unbelievable. I don’t think there’s enough enablers out there to fill all these roles. So what you know, we’re gonna talk about, again, after your learnings, somebody is seeking to move into enablement. And I’ve had a lot of these conversations. And as you did it, and now that you have a year under your belt,

Unknown Speaker
what

Adriana Romero
are those things that you want to share with somebody who wants to make that move?

Ashton Williams
Yeah, so I’d say this, you don’t necessarily have to come from enablement to go to enablement. I interviewed a ton of candidates, and I ended up hiring someone who wasn’t an enabler before this role. And they, you know, they were the best interview, they they were able to outline the challenge the relationship, the business impact. And so I’d say don’t be afraid if you’ve never had enablement experience to apply for an enablement role. But do your research on what enablement is, especially what your manager or leader that you’re gonna report to defines it as most enablers have done a talk or an article of some kind. We’re all yelling from the rooftops our beliefs on what enablement is, don’t do yourself a disservice and not look up their definition or ask them their definition before you get to that interview, because I had a lot of people who were wonderful, and unfortunately didn’t take the time to look up what how I defined enablement, which I’m pretty vocal about. And we had an interview where I was like, that’s 100% not going to be your goals. No, that’s not in scope of this job. Actually, that’s not going to be owned by you. We have a team for that. And I am shocked you didn’t research it. So I’d say set yourself set yourself up for success by being on the same page, right level set with what the definition because at different companies that can look so different. If you are really trying to get into enabler right now, understand the reason why a company is asking for enablement, I tell every single person who asks me about interviewing, you need to vet that company, read that job description, ask why they’re looking externally, not internally, ask if this is a backfill or a new role, ask what the expectations are, be clear on the business impact that you’re going to be responsible for. Because people don’t put that in the job description, like you’re choosing to open a role that’s cross functional, you obviously have some type of impact tied to it. Right? And and you want to know what that is, make sure you deeply understand that and then start your interview, how you’re going to frame it properly. also join the community. I mean, there’s no better way to learn about enablement, the watch enablers ask questions and struggles. And, you know, we do a lot of that we’re open to sharing. But there’s so many people who think they know what enablement is based on their one experience with one company. And in fact, maybe that company did it really poorly, or based on their experiences with another enabler. And maybe that wasn’t great either. Or it was like, you know, you were at a 5000 person sales team. And what you’re going to go do in a 200 person company are very different for you at enablement and ops combined, in which case, that’s a very different role than strict enablement, or strict ops.

Adriana Romero
And so and so important because it is it is very different. And I think it’s important to understand what you said about know the leader that you’re going to be reporting into and understand kind of like how they think that’s number one that’s so important. And and, and I also explained to people also take one step forward and see where that leader reports into right, because to your point, very different if you report into operations into revenue, or report into marketing, or even report into people, it might have a different kind of path and a different kind of color, the personality of enablement in the company. And I think that’s, that’s super important.

Ashton Williams
So I think I want to add to if you’re going into enablement, you have to understand organizational structure in a way that I think I took for granted when I started because now I can look at a learning designer that maybe isn’t a learning designer job, or, you know, an onboarding leader that is, in fact, an enabler job. And they’re, they’re named all these different things. When I look at the reporting structure, I’m like, Okay, this is like a go to market person. Okay. This is actually culture and development and onboarding exclusively person. But you have to understand how does power business shapes that so that you know what job you’re really signing up for? Because the titles are all over the place? Oh, totally. Totally. It’s

Adriana Romero
funny how you see different types of my like, What? Oh, you

Unknown Speaker
do? Yeah,

Adriana Romero
you do enablement like, Yes, of course. Yeah. It’s always so good to have you here. I love seeing you and learning all the good things that you have been doing everything that you have ahead of you. We will of course, talk later this year about your CSS enablement. I think that’s going to be a great topic to talk, you know, here in the live, but refresh us a little bit. I know you’re an avid reader and an avid podcast listener. So you’re not going to go away without giving us the tip of this time. What are you reading right now?

Ashton Williams
So I just wrapped up breath by James Nester, and I’m gonna say it talks about the science of breathing and how we can improve as humans Breath. It’s got a lot of things in it. But I walk around now trying to like, make sure I’m breathing through my nose, or like counting my breaths. Now, it’s this very interesting thing that automatically makes you conscious of how you’re breathing. Which I think everyone in my company, we’ve now read this and we’re all like

Adriana Romero
that’s such a that’s such a good one. I will teach you after a funny breath. My daughter taught me from school. So I think yeah, it’s very good.

Unknown Speaker
I’m enjoying that right now.

Adriana Romero
And tell me more about podcasts. Any anything right now that strikes to your attention?

Ashton Williams
I’ve been dropping the ball on the podcast front, because I’ll be honest, I’m doing all these talks now. Their

Adriana Romero
course.

Ashton Williams
You know what happened last year, I just I agree to a bunch. And I was like, Yeah, yeah, I’d like whatever. And I didn’t realize it, they’re like all in the same week. So I haven’t been listening as avidly, but I’ve been really loving. So winning by design is a company that we’re hoping to work with. But they had a video that they put out about virtual kayo. And through that, I went down this rabbit hole of like all these little virtual training tips. And I have to say, like super helpful, super wonderful, I probably have been listening to that so much more than a podcast right now. And just hearing kind of how their methodology works. So so the virtual kayo video which I will recommend anyone about to run a virtual kayo watch this before you do it, it’s really really helpful and good, but also if you’re running Virtual Training,

Adriana Romero
yeah, I love that but when everything is doing so I’m excited you guys are going to hopefully work together. But you know, learning is important. It doesn’t matter how and the source feeding podcasts listening to videos like anything that will give you something that you didn’t know before or that’s gonna make you better. It is always in my book something good as soon I love this I love that you know as you guys notice, Ashton is you know bringing in spring I love the colors the spring you know, mindset. Hopefully, you know the next time that we meet Ashley is going to be like we I’m going to be outside doing the live with you. And you’re going to be

Ashton Williams
I can’t wait to we can actually have a coffee somewhere and do this. That’s like dream state right now.

Adriana Romero
His dream state is in person coffee. I’m going to drive to the city to just have that coffee with you because it is important and much needed. But anyway, everybody, thank you so much for tuning in right now. And if you listen to this later, thank you so much for listening. If you want to reach out to Ashton, she’s super open and available in LinkedIn. So reach out to her if you’re looking for Ron enablement, and she has some open roles, please reach out to her as well. And it was amazing to be here and the coffee collaboration and enablement live and see you guys in a couple of weeks. Thanks for having me. Bye, everyone.