Jeremy Levine, Director of International Business Development at WalkMe, joined Avner Baruch to discuss building an SDR team of outbound development reps.

Jeremy was the first outbound SDR at WalkMe and shared a lot of great insights from his work.

From developing a deep understanding of the business’ Lemonade statement and elevator pitch, through demonstrating great attributes like agility and adaptability, Jeremy sets us up with some fantastic insights. 

Give a listen and remain curious.

Audio Transcript

Avner Baruch
I’ve got a surprise for you, Jeremy. You’ll see that in a minute.

Unknown Speaker
Okay. All right, fair enough.

Avner Baruch
everyone today I have with us, Dr. J, also known has Jeremy Levine. Jeremy is the director of International Business Development at me. And today is going to share with us a bit of his wisdom and expertise. What’s it like to build an enable a team of reps in a complex market and blue ocean of opportunities? Jimmy, I know that, you know, you’re eager to get started. But before you actually do, could you tell us a little bit about yourself your journey and walk me and what keeps you busy today?

Jeremy Levin
Of course, of course, I thank you for having me. So my journey of walk me has been quite the adventure, I have to say, I don’t come from Tech. My background is art and wine. We can Israel back in my this is my studio, or my office formerly known as my studio. I but when I moved to Israel in 2008, or came back to Israel, I lived here in my 20s as an artist, I was a wine professional from the US, such as some channels of wine and in restaurants, where he was slowly a and training white stuffs I and then my last role before I left, the US was the marketing director and the wine educator for this beautiful new cooking school. And I thought when I came to Israel, I have this amazing skill set and all this knowledge that I’d built over all these years about wine and I came here and shock, I was never going to happen, right. So I toyed around for a little while I tried to make it brief, very young and mature, and wasn’t really ready for somebody like me. But as an English speaker living in Israel, I needed to make money to support my family. So I ended up in call centers working in a variety of different businesses selling in English over the phone. Towards the end of that period, I you know, came to the conclusion that high tech or bus, right there was there’s you know, if I need to build a career here, I’m here, I’ve been here 12 years now. And I it was, if I’m going to build a future for me, and my wife and my family and my children, I needed to move into tech. And so I put out CVS walk me was the only company that called me. And I can’t even explain to you how lucky I felt that they did. But I’ll tell you about that in a minute. I went through the interview process. It was a tough one for a junior role as a SDR sales development Rep. We didn’t even have a business development team yet. And and after sending in my references, I got a letter of rejection.

Unknown Speaker
Oh my god.

Jeremy Levin
Right. And and I said, You know, I couldn’t believe it. I didn’t know what went wrong. Right. So I asked, you know, and I don’t think people, you know, do this enough. But I asked, you know, where did I go wrong? And so I asked the recruiter that and she said, Oh, we’re looking for somebody a little bit more junior went more junior, as well. And that’s what I get. So I write this letter, you know, I really, you know, a double my experience would actually be something that would be valuable to walk me. I you know, I asked you guys to time to reconsider. And my wife read the letter and she said they don’t want to hire a 40 something year old str. Right. You’re too old. And so when I signed it, I you know, I beg you to reconsider. Sincerely, Jeremy Levine forever young at heart with a Winky emoji. Right. They called me 10 minutes later and said we’ll have a contract for you on Monday. You can start that right. sizing. Amen. Right. I don’t even know what I was hired for at that point. I

Avner Baruch
I just you know, we are saying I was saying that that gives me an idea to bring you in again, to talk about objection handling

Jeremy Levin
as well. So I I didn’t know if I was hired for inbound or outbound apparently with the way that I approached it. They’re like you’re an outbound, because that’s going straight to outbound. And it turns out I was the very first hire outbound hire for walking. Whoa. I and I remember, I didn’t even really know what walk me was yet. And it was my first day and they actually had the employee orientation that day. It was a quarterly thing, but it was just lucky that my first day that happened to be there. And as I’m sitting there, Rafi squarey, was giving what was known as the very first of the DAP pitches, right. We were just coined the term digital Option platform, just building that identity as our own category of software. And I listened to Rafi talk about the future of walk me. And you know what we did. And I was blown away. Like, I got it immediately. And I’m like, Oh, my God, this is incredible. Like the potential of this, and immediately I started, you know, right on the phones, oh, this is walk me digital adoption platform. And and I remember the youngest era is like, don’t use that yet. Nobody knows what that is digital adoption platform, it doesn’t mean anything. I’m like, Well, if we don’t start using it, then nobody will ever know what it is. We have to start using this today. Right and start building that identity.

Avner Baruch
So Jimmy, let’s actually pose here and spend some time a few minutes to talk about, you know, the importance of having the right skills using the picking the right words, when you cold, call someone, and he’s never heard about your company before. And you know, you’ve got this challenge to educate prospects about you know, the values, the USPS Unique Selling proposed proposals of your product, but at the same time, you need to educate the prospect about you know, what is it that you do the company, the category that you’re trying to establish, and it’s very hard, it’s one of the most difficult jobs to cold call someone from scratch, especially seniors and sea levels, could share a bit of your experience? And what does it take to to accomplish the game the prospects attention? And to move from 30 seconds to probably 30 minutes?

Jeremy Levin
Yeah, sure. I think the first thing that you have to realize, or the most, you know, at the very least put it this way, the first thing you have to get eration Is that an outbound rep is on the forefront of messaging. Okay, they are the very first point of contact for any future client of that company. Okay. And because of that, they have to be perfectly keyed into what the most current messaging is about the product and be able to express it in one of two ways. Right? The first of which is what we call lemonade pitch, right? Or the lemonade statement, what the product is, what it does, who’s it for? Right? And so if you sum it up, this product is this and it’s for everybody, okay? Or it’s for sales, or it’s for HR, right? And so you’ve got to be equipped with that lemonade statement. And you also have to be equipped with an elevator pitch, right? The, you know, an explanation and 30 seconds of what your product is, what it does, and who’s it for, right and the value that it can bring. Okay? And and those are the two most important aspects. That’s what every BDR or outbound needs to bring to the table, and with the understanding that they are going to be that first person delivering that message. So it needs to be incredibly clear. Right? Especially when you’re calling people cold. Right. Now, I think one of the worst questions that a BDR can ask is, oh, you know, you know, do you have a moment? Right, or I hope I didn’t catch you at a bad time. Yeah. Right. It’s always a bad time, right? It’s always a bad time. So if you can accept that fact, and be prepared, you know, that we’re calling cold, it’s always a bad time. Right? The worst thing that can happen is no, good.

Jeremy Levin
Okay,

Jeremy Levin
so as long as you’ve got that, that lemonade statement, and that elevator pitch, and you’re equipped with that, okay, then everything else is secondary? Because they want you to dive further in not gonna be the call to action.

Avner Baruch
So how do you put together a lemonade statement? And I mean, let’s talk about the situation where, you know, you don’t have a one to one relationship between your product and the market. Or in other words, let’s say that, you know, what you can offer to the market comes with different flavors you can sell to, you know, any market you know, there’s a blue ocean of opportunities and verticals and industries that you can address. Is there one specific lemonade statement or one size fits all? Does it work or what does it take to you know, to move more effectively, or to gain better results?

Jeremy Levin
So there isn’t you have to cater to whoever you’re speaking to, okay. So, that means that you know, a good outbound or today needs to have a an amazing base of knowledge especially if they have a product that is so diverse, right, that can go into that has no market cap that can go across the entire organization or any vertical, okay, they need to be prepared as to how this will impact banking or how this will impact insurance or Telecom, how this will impact HR or how this will impact sales or you know, digital, they have to be prepared for those statements. Okay, no matter what, but at its core, right, what the outbound er needs to have, okay? isn’t just the pitches and the knowledge they have to have some cases. Core core values are some core values, not the right word, I, agility, agility, agility is definitely one of those cores, agility, adaptability, they have to be proactive in praise, I absolutely on the spot, okay. And then they have to, you know, and they have to also have skin that’s, you know, very thick. Right and, and can can take rejection easily and can take, you know, I, you know, criticism or you know, any kind of negativity over the phone and just brush it off. I’ll tell you, it’s really funny. One of my managers once put a filter on gone to recognize when people curse and, and, and it turns out, I was the worst, but never during the call only when the phone hung up. Oh, that was, you know, I would curse like crazy after the phone hung up, right and always flagged me but it was always at the end of the call, it was just, I was still recording, I but that’s part of the thick skin, you know, you’re like, you also got to know when to vent, right? So it’s, you know, having that knowledge, having the capabilities of being adaptable and agile, right? proactive. Those are core qualities that you need in order to be successful. Okay? And but you have to be adaptable, you’ve got to be adaptable, and you got to be able to change it. And you have to be an incredibly good active listener. Definitely, great. You’ve got to listen to your prospect. Okay? And and to be able to take what they’re saying and and be able to, you know, flip it immediately. Right? And make sure that you’re always reaching for that next step, you got to make that next step, every call needs to have that next step, even if it’s a Hey, do you mind if I call you back next week to check in? Right? The minute they say yes, they’ve given you permission to call them every day until they answer.

Avner Baruch
And it’s all about getting that permission, when you talk when you meet with the prospect. Absolutely, throughout the entire communication, always, you know, get that permission to continue talk and continue talking and, you know, whatever it is, you need to you need to do. You need to be 100%. Yeah. And sensitive enough to understand where to shut up. And when to take over?

Unknown Speaker
For sure.

Avner Baruch
Yep. So as a leader, you know, and I mean, I know that you were very successful, that you are a very successful leader and you build an amazing thing. Could you give us some tips and some of your expertise and experience about, you know, building a team of outbound business development reps? And where do you start? How do you basically help everyone who joins your team to do their role more effectively? And to gain those skills that you mentioned earlier? Because I think that you would agree with me that, you know, inbound sales and outbound sales requires a different skill set. How do you help everyone who joins your team to to acquire those skills? What does it look like? You know, the first early weeks? Where do you put your focus?

Jeremy Levin
That’s a tough question. No one right answer to that, right. But I think the most important thing is, you know, how you hire, right? Forget about the onboarding and stuff like that, the first thing you have to do is you have to hire, right? And you have to make sure that within the process, that you have the capability to test the prospect, okay. And my test, what I’ll do is call scenarios, right Ring Ring call scenarios, I’ll give them a very loose, you know, sheet, a couple of personas, you know, four or five days to prep for it. Okay, and and then I’ll bring another BDR into the call scenario to act as the persona and I’ll listen in the background. Now, what are we testing for when we do that? Right. And this is the key, because, you know, it’s it, you know, people think it’s about the pitch, and it’s not at all about the pitch, right? Because we’re going to give them the pitch, they can learn the pitch. That’s not the big deal. First and foremost, was the person prepared? Right? Did they go outside the realm of what you gave them? Did they look up additional information? Right, I had somebody that dropped. You know, some of our clients instead of one of the, you know, one of the scenarios, oh, we’re already working with these companies here and that company there and this company there, and I was like, Wow, that’s great. That means they actually went to a website, looked at our you know, who they’re working with, and actually took competitive companies to put into the scenario that was really well done. Right. So the price. I remember, you know, what my first hire ever when I took over as the manager of the team, when I did her call scenarios, I came into the you know, came into the room because the phone wasn’t working. And she had all these sheets of papers spread out across the deck. Right? And I was like, I just want to check as we were doing French, you know which call scenarios you had. So I can look at the personas. And I looked at the sheet of paper, and each one of them had a name after it. I’m like, oh, what are these names here? She’s like, Oh, those are the people. I found them on LinkedIn. I’m like that was that I didn’t even have to interview her at that point. I was blown away. Right? Just that the amount of preparation that she put into the interview,

Avner Baruch
she was able to correct.

Unknown Speaker
Okay, so that’s,

Jeremy Levin
that’s number one. Number two is coach ability. Right? in between each scenario, you have to give feedback. And whether or not they can apply that feedback to the next call is going to tell you right away, whether or not they’re coachable. Right, and you cannot hire somebody that is not coachable.

Avner Baruch
It’s an agreement. Yep.

Jeremy Levin
Right. And they have to be coachable. That is number one priority. Okay. So if they can’t take the information that they have, right, and apply it immediately to the next call that you’ve given them, even if they’re doing really good, you still want to give them some kind of feedback, right. And I ran scenarios earlier today. And she every single time, she took exactly what we said and applied it to the next call, it was beautiful.

Unknown Speaker
So well done.

Avner Baruch
I think this is if I may pose here, I think this is extremely important to hire coachable people, whatever the role is, especially if you are in the SAS business, and you aim very high, and you want to move very, very fast, and you can’t afford someone who weighs you down, hold you back, and can actually adapt to whatever it takes in order to more and more effectively. And that means basically, you know, spending time catching up on the latest competitive landscape, adapting your pitch, your laminated statement, according to whatever product marketing put together and go to market playbooks, new persona, new challenges, new KPIs, if you stay, you know, stay put in same situation, you know, stick to whatever you think works, and you can adopt, you’re going to be lagging behind, and that doesn’t work for the entire business. So as a manager, as a leader, I think you would agree with me that you want to find those early signs of, you know, being able to, to adopt, right, coachable people or someone who’s not able to adopt no agility whatsoever?

Jeremy Levin
Well, and that’s the last thing that you want to test for is the adaptability. Yep. Right. And so you throw some different things into the scenarios that you know, whether or not they can deal with, you know, objections, whether or not they can deal with the wrong person altogether, you know, and how they adapt to that. And that, you know, it turns out, after today, I’m going to create the hiring right now. And it’s the great equalizer, right? That is, you know, the call scenarios, that exercise is the great equalizer, we can easily narrow down people that are just not suitable. And you know, and has always been, like, Oh, I like this person, so much, but the minute they get into the call scenarios, and they tank it, that’s it, you know, I and it makes it very easy that way too, because, you know, especially when you’ve got a lot of good prospects in the in the pipe.

Avner Baruch
But by the way, what I usually see, well, sometimes the, during the first weeks, or sometimes a little bit later, is that sometimes the prospect just you know, gives us on a silver plate, great information, gold information, gold data, and some, some reps just, you know, ignore that, because they’re, you know, they couldn’t catch up on either, you know, competitive landscape. So it’s the first time to hear about that competitor, they have no idea how to tackle that. So it just goes all the way through either discovery page, slides, whatever it is, and that’s a huge Miss. And eventually, we’re going to lose that opportunity. So being able to adapt to, you know, having agility and investing the F words and time to brush up and catch up on, you know, changes, new, new pitch new discovery questions in between calls, you know, puts you in on the edge with the on an a better place in a better place in terms of being able to tackle any possible objection. Um, you know, understanding what could be a potential, you know, pushback from the prospect, even even if it’s the first time you’re gonna meet with that specific persona. I think, yeah.

Jeremy Levin
100% I now you were, you also asked about like onboarding, right? That’s where it gets tricky. Okay. I and I guess one of the biggest challenges that I’ve had in onboarding is I haven’t brought in groups. I’ve always brought in solo contributors. And so you know, it comes incredibly challenging, especially when you bring in like, you know, three different people For three months, and they’re all in different stages of their ramp and their onboarding, I it’s not efficient. Right? If you’re hiring a lot, you know, I definitely recommend that you want to bring in a group together, so you can onboard them together. Also, it will be good for culture and would also be good for, you know, teamwork and collaboration. And they’ll help drive each other, especially when they hit the phones. Right. So I, but having, you know, part of the onboarding program, that, you know, is important to me beyond like, you know, knowledge sessions, which are extremely important. Beyond, you know, the actual education of the product, the role, you know, the the culture of the company, I think it’s also important to incorporate the team in the onboarding process, right? I want, I require all of my new hires to meet with each and every individual, the team, they schedule it themselves, I want them to be proactive in that front, I and spend an hour with each member of the team, regardless of how long they’ve been with the company, because I think everybody else will have something different to offer. I think that there needs to be lots of dedicated times and listening to calls. So you have context. I and I believe that you got to have some sort of structure in place, you know, to make sure that first and foremost, the onboarding experience is an enjoyable one, because that can make or break an employee. Right, Randy brand new employee, and, and that’s, you know, that you’ve gotten, you’ve got an ends, right, okay, onboarding, you know, education and enablement, last prep, right. But onboarding has to have an end cap. And if you say that 10% of learning is learned formally, 20% is from your co workers, and 70% is on your own, you got to make sure that you cater to that, right that individual learning experience, also very important, and also helps to have a great enablement team around you, to support you. And, you know, that is also very important, you know, and to give them the freedom to do what they do best, right? I’m not a professional enablement, I, you know, I love to teach, there’s no doubt about it, and I thoroughly enjoy it, but it’s not where my training and my talent long is. Right? I so I definitely, you know, definitely give my enablement team the freedom to build the structure out to help me, you know, and also I need the help, it’s not, you know, there’s always capacity issues, too, right? It’s, you know, I don’t necessarily have the time to build this out on my own. So I’m gonna, I’m gonna take any help I can get, and and and trust the team that they know what they’re doing. They’ve been doing it for a long time.

Avner Baruch
Yep. Put simply, you need a scalable system? Absolutely. 100%. So let me ask you a very challenging question. Probably the one of the toughest questions. I mean, it depends. Given, you know, let’s assume that you’re selling a specific product into a specific space, could be a complex work, I mean, ecosystem, you know, as I said, before, blue ocean of opportunities you can address, you know, so many verticals, etc. And you’ve got that amazing candidate person that you want to bring in, and is an outsider, he has no idea of the space, the technology, you know, the terminology, the lingo, I mean, complete stranger. But you believe in, in her his skills you think is going to be they’re going to be a very good fit, but they’re outsiders. What would you do in order to, you know, help them to gain confidence and to, you know, to bring them on board? Well,

Jeremy Levin
it’s funny that you mentioned that, because that’s very close to my hiring profile. I typically tend to hire for culture, you know, cultural fits and potential versus experience. life experience is very important to me, but I’ve given a lot of people in my team, you know, fresh starts and tech, as I myself had to, as I told you a story before, you know, I’m brand new to the tech world myself, I’ve only been in it for four years now. I and so I you know, I think that again, it just comes down to like proper enablement, right and excitement. Right, passion. Okay, if you come in with passion as a leader about the products and the space and the potential and talk about it, you know, as much as you can, you know, it’s, it’s, it’s only going to carry over to your employees. It’s like, it absolutely sticks. Hey, now, I do remember that, you know, learning the high tech language was a little challenging in the beginning because it was like speaking a new language, and I’m not getting But languages as shown in Hebrew. Okay. And just tell me if there’s any breakup or anything like that. But I was talking about a, you know, the language of high tech, it is a new language and you have to come off, you know, the most important thing is as as an outbound or as a BDR, you have to come off as a trusted consultant. Yeah. Right. And so you’ve got to be able to speak that language. Right. And that’s where the biggest challenge, I think, lies with new people that are coming into the industry, you know, is is understanding and speaking that language and approaching, you know, a call to a high level person as a trusted consultant and not as somebody that’s, you know, lower than them.

Unknown Speaker
Speaking of word,

Avner Baruch
definitely. Yep, beautifully said. Yep.

Unknown Speaker
Cheers.

Avner Baruch
So, we were approaching the, you know, our time and, and, you know, technology doesn’t actually help us here with the bandwidth, and probably the, whatever it is, I mean, yeah, this has been a very, you know, enjoyable conversation, always great to talk to you, Jeremy, I enjoy it, I think we gained quite quite some insights in this conversation, and I’ll be more than happy to share this with everyone. But before we actually conclude any final words of wisdom, any, any tips you want to share with everyone, whatever it is,

Unknown Speaker
um,

Jeremy Levin
I think, you know, the most important thing is to remember what the outbound role is, right? That this person, the forefront of messaging, that this person, the first point of contact, your, you know, your, your, your tip of your sales spear, right, that you have to treat them as such, okay, you have to enable them as such, okay, they have to be on included in the messaging, you know, sessions, they have to be on the forefront of it. And and they have to be even more adaptable than your product marketing team. Oh, yeah. Right, because Product Marketing takes, you know, can take their time building out the messaging, regardless, if they’re on a timeline. That’s their focus. But BDR is out bounders they need to be able to, you know, incorporate new messaging within days, minutes, right, as the companies evolve as your product evolves, right. And you have to be able, you know, COVID was an amazing experience in messaging. Right? How many times that we change our messaging throughout the year, starting from the very beginning, when we went into the first lockdowns, we start talking about business continuity planning, I got everybody, we got to talk about this immediately. And then the switch, now we’re talking about work from home. And then we’re talking about this, and then we’re talking about that. And as our founders are on the forefront, we have to change that messaging immediately. Right? and deploy it immediately. It’s not like we got a practice or anything like that. This is like, okay, we’re changing our sequences, we’re changing our pitch today. And you have to take that pitch to your next call immediately. Right? You need to hire. Well, that’s, that’s where you start, right? You got to make sure that you have agile and adaptable people and driven driven people. You got to figure out your prospects, drivers, and thick skin. Yeah, thick skin is also very important. And probably a good sense of humor too. Because to be able to laugh at yourself.

Avner Baruch
There is there is a rumor actually that says that you’re actually measuring the thickness of your candidate skin. When you harden I

Jeremy Levin
I like that. I like taking that to market

Avner Baruch
Let me check on thick your skin is

Unknown Speaker
right. Yeah.

Avner Baruch
Maybe I should I should I need to remove that.

Jeremy Levin
I don’t know. I like it very much. Bring it to market. How thick is your skin? Right?

Avner Baruch
It’s mine. It’s mine. Okay.

Jeremy Levin
Make sure that’s copyright. And every time I say it, how thick is skin copyright. Every single time I you know, you gotta have some fight to write I mean really, you gotta have some fight. You know, you gotta you that’s that’s the key, right? You’ve got to be able to and you’ve got to be able to take that know and turn into something else because what I always tell my people first and foremost is they can be the bad guys. Right? That about our founders, we can be the bad guys every single time. Okay, we can call until they say yes. Right until they get so sick of us that they say yes or tell us the you know, piss off but like i favorites, you know, I think You know, great achievements and get letter, the account executive, please tell Jeremy Levine to stop contacting us. We know who you are, we’re engaged. We’re talking to you guys. Tell him to stop. Okay?

Avner Baruch
Do whatever it takes.

Unknown Speaker
Yeah.

Jeremy Levin
The message is getting through. Okay, he’s doing his job. Right. And he’s been successful. Okay, if you get that cease and desist letter, that

Avner Baruch
means your BDR is doing a good job. Take my credit card, just getting off my back.

Jeremy Levin
I think there was, we had a big company. And one of the, you know, he was the head of HR systems, big company. And you know, he said, call back next week, and I’m like, did you get them? No, no answer when you call him every day until you get to Germany to write and they’re very proper in Germany. And we got the guy came into the call, and for the first five minutes, all he did was he about your car was, you know what, but he was on the call, right. And that’s all that matters. And so I tell the A ees, when I onboard them, throw the bdrs under the bus, if you have to, we don’t care, we’ve got the thick skin. Right? We are the bad guys, we’re enabling you guys to be the good guys. Right? good cop, bad cop or be the superhero, let the a swing in there, throw the BDR under the bus and be the hero because in the end, that’s what matters, right? Is what we carry through the relationships in closed business. Right? If you accept that about your team, it will be much more successful.

Avner Baruch
I totally agree. And I want to add something else. We’ve talked a lot about no cold calling, developing a business, you know, green, Greenfield, business from scratch from the ground up, reaching out to people for the first time. This is extremely important. And it takes, you know, the majority percent of your time, but most people forget that, you know, the other job, the other tasks, the other responsibility, this falls under the you know, BDR or outbound sales development, responsibility or umbrella is to work very closely with, you know, sales and retention, to make sure that the you know, we’re able to expand the account, and that takes another skill set, and maybe we can leave that is another topic for another. Another session,

Jeremy Levin
I would love to come in and talk about that.

Avner Baruch
Absolutely.

Jeremy Levin
Yep. That relationship with your account team is the most important relationship in the BDR. Right, but also understanding the capabilities of the BDR. Okay, from the the team understands how to utilize them well is also important,

Avner Baruch
and sharing the all those attributes and data that allows every side of the you know, of the business to stay aligned. And, you know not to not to find yourself, you know, falling because of misinformation, misalignment, whatever it is, you work together as one team, you need to speak the same language, you need to be exposed to the same data. And you need to, you know, to come unified and present yourself as one team in the eyes of the prospect. And that’s extremely important. And in most cases, I don’t see that happening.

Jeremy Levin
It’s a It’s a shame when it but when it does work, it’s amazing, which could angry right. And, you know, I think that I think one of the challenges that lie there is just how people view BDR is and part of it has to do with how the orders are built in the United States. ADR is its own generating or where the junior people and basically turn them into account executives, right. And that’s the structure of the organization in the US. But it also puts this kind of umbrella over the BDR role is being a junior role, right. And I work very hard to elevate the role, right? It’s so much more than that. Or it can be so much more than that, when you have a true strategic bdrs. And the value they can provide to an account team is so much value, especially with the skill set the prospecting skill sets, the knowledge they bring to the markets, and the knowledge they have of like building out buying centers and stuff like that is incredibly valuable to any team that’s working with them. Oh, bless you love it. No worries,

Avner Baruch
I have to raise that.

Jeremy Levin
Anyways, I would love to come back and talk all about the value of the BDR in the BDR role today. That’s the topic for another day, but it’s something that’s very close to my heart. So for sure, you know, extend the invitation and I’ll be there we can talk about that next time. Definitely.

Avner Baruch
So I want to thank you, Jeremy, Dr. J.

Jeremy Levin
You’re the only one ever called me that by the way.

Avner Baruch
Well, they will now.

Unknown Speaker
Alright, fair enough.

Avner Baruch
Um, this has been pure fun. I really enjoyed it. Always great to talk to you and to catch up and looking forward to our next session. I hope everyone else enjoyed that session. I did. And yeah, we should play or Abner No,

Unknown Speaker
absolutely.

Jeremy Levin
Absolutely. Mobile till the next conversation I guess.

Avner Baruch
Yep. Okay.