Emily Turner, Global Enablement Specialist at Shopify, joined Adriana Romero, Regional Host and Trusted Advisor for Coffee, Collaboration, and Enablement in Canada, to discuss beginning a new enablement career, enabling new enablers, understanding the WHY, and so much more.

Here are a couple of the highlights.

1️⃣Her boss walked through the frameworks used to deliver enablement prior to the more formal onboarding, giving her insight and vision into the why of the approaches being used.

2️⃣She shared the importance of change management in enablement, and why it’s so important to dig into this area.

So much value.

Give a listen and remain curious.

Audio Transcript

Adriana Romero
Hey, I am joined by the fabulous Emily Turner from Shopify, and I’m super excited to have you here Emily. Not only I love showcasing Canadian enablers, but this is also a Canadian success story. So it’s for me a double a double whammy I love. You know, when I get the opportunity to talk with people that work in Canadian companies. How are you today, Emily?

Emily Turner
I am good. I’m excited. It’s Friday. It’s very snowy in Toronto. So I’m looking forward to hopefully getting into like some snow activities this

Unknown Speaker
weekend as well.

Emily Turner
I’m very excited.

Adriana Romero
Yeah, that is good. Yeah. And you know what, I’ve heard that we’re gonna have snow for the next five days. So that’s going to be pretty exciting. I am very happy that I don’t have to commute in the snow. That’s you know,

Emily Turner
that’s that’s why I live in a condo so I don’t have to shovel so I’m probably a bit more pro snow than most people. Oh,

Adriana Romero
totally. So we it’s funny we have this is when you realize that you bought a house that has too much of a big driveway. It’s in the snow. It’s very good, very convenient for you know, any other season. But in the winter, you’re like, why did we get this house with this driveway. But anyway, I’m not complaining. The snow goes away. We’re in Canada. We know this happens. We just complain about it every year, right?

Emily Turner
kind of funny we do. We do complain about it every year. And every year. We’re always surprised when the first no happens. It’s always funny.

Adriana Romero
It’s funny, because nobody has winter tires. By the time the first no happens. So that’s also interesting. I’ve I’ve seen a lot of people in it. You know, the first step of snow comes in November, and he’s like, Oh my god, I was so unprepared like, Canada just put the winter tires late October. Anyway, enough about winter. Emily, tell us a little bit about you. Um, you know, give us a little bit of your background and what you’re doing right now. Yeah, so

Emily Turner
I am currently on Shopify, I work in on on our enablement team. We recently changed things around so I moved from a retail team to our global team. But prior to joining Shopify and joining enablement, I’d actually spent the last five and a half years in tech sales as an account executive at a couple of different companies based out of Toronto, so softchoice, another Canadian company. And then after that, prior to Shopify, I was most recently at Salesforce. So working in healthcare and Life Sciences.

Adriana Romero
That’s amazing. So also, you know, there’s there’s some similarities in our backgrounds, you also come from working in sales, which is super interesting. And now you’re enablement. So, you know, I love to talk about these topics to anybody that moves into enablement. I’ve met people that come from maybe technical, you know, training background or technical sales people that come from being an account executive like you like myself, people that come from l&d backgrounds, and join and want the excitement of the sales floor. What made Emily interested in enablement?

Emily Turner
Yeah. So I actually got into sales, and it’s kind of goes back a bit. But I got into sales because I wanted to be a teacher. And I was graduating from university and I was running out of money. Basically, there’s no more school until I’ve been working for a bit. And so I got a job offer. I was doing sales there. And I really liked it. I liked what I was doing. I was finding I was successful at it, I was moving up quickly within their different roles. It just didn’t make sense to go back to school at that time. So I continued on in sales, and I loved the coaching and the mentoring, I had the opportunity to do at the different organizations I worked with and being a team lead and getting to that kind of stuff. I found that I was getting more excited when my teammates were winning deals that I’d helped on the necessarily even when I was putting on my deals. And so that was kind of one of the things that I knew I wanted to move into coaching of some sort. A friend of mine had moved from Salesforce into enablement. And she kind of mentioned that she thought it would be a really great fit and I should maybe explore it. So I did some research did some looking around. And then Luckily, the opportunity came up at Shopify, so that I got to apply for for it, they took a bit of a chance they were looking for someone who maybe had that sales background, but not as much enablement experience. So I got really lucky there. Yeah, kind of all came full circle, I wanted to be in teaching and helping people learn and it came full circle at the end.

Adriana Romero
I really liked your story with you know, your idea of being a teacher and I’ve, I’ve kind of seen a lot of similar patterns and different stories, people that either like coaching, you know, remember Allie spoke about, you know, being a life coach, you know, people that maybe were interested or doing training like Amanda who you know, that’s what she loved to do. I remember you know, now that you’re saying that I remember that’s one of the things that I didn’t want to be exactly a teacher but I always enjoy teaching people so I remember when I was doing software implementation, back in the day when it was not done in the cloud. I love doing like the on you know, onsite customer training, which is super difficult, like customer training and I command you know, CS teams very much because customer training is very difficult because you do a lot of mindset, changing So that is that is interesting. So Emily, you know, you come with that this is what you like to do you join enablement. You not only switch your career, you switch jobs, you switch companies, we’re talking the January of 2020, the world seemed that everything was going to be okay. And then everything else happened. So you did a lot of pivots at once, you know, even a bigger pivot of you were not coming from an enablement background. So your pivot was more about learning about enablement, in a new role with a new company, a new leader. Tell us a little bit more about your process of adapting to all that. And you know, some of the things that Emily did to you know, one year later be talking about a successful year.

Emily Turner
Yeah. So, one of the biggest changes, I think, from moving into sales into enablement is in sales. Everything is so metrics based so you know, exactly, have you had a successful day, at the end of the day, you can look back and say like, yes, you know, what, there are clear, defining targets that tell me, I’ve had a good day, or I’ve had a good month, or I’ve crushed my quarter. And in enablement, it’s a bit more ambiguous. So I found in my first month, I was finishing my days, and I was maybe working extra hours working longer to be like, I don’t really know. And like, have I had a good day like, there’s no i didn’t book 10 meetings, I didn’t close any opportunities. I didn’t hit my sales, like, how am I striving? So that was a big change for me to be able to start to look rather than looking at like smaller, more minute numbers, but like bigger pieces, like, how many pieces are refinishing? Are we tracking on on time for all the projects we’re working on? Things like that. So that was a big shift, even just the way that you communicate with new leaders and things like that, and enablement. There’s a lot like constant feedback, which has been really great. So I got to learn like that. But in sales, it can be a little daunting when after you’ve finished presenting everyone’s like, Okay, can we can we chat about about that last meeting real quick? And you’re like, Sure, we can chat Am I gonna be so my manager had to deal with every time we’d finish something you pick me? Like, can you just step in here and like to chat about how that when I was I was like, Am I am I introducing

Adriana Romero
a famous debrief, let’s debrief about that meeting.

Emily Turner
Which in sales is not sometimes it’s great, and sometimes it’s not. And so, I had to, the puppy is communicating as well.

Adriana Romero
My dog is out there, he knows I’m an ally, because he’s doing like this very gore sound. So I’m like, I just muted myself until I’m not to start barking. You might be communicating with your puppy.

Emily Turner
There we go. Um, yeah, it was a bit of a change to communicating. Also, a shift from managing external stakeholders, like customers, who you’re answering questions for,

Unknown Speaker
it’s a little bit more.

Emily Turner
Maybe persistent is the word I’m gonna use, right? When you’re in sales, and you’re following up with people versus internal stakeholders. It’s a different it was a different set of relationship managing, I had to learn, you can’t just show up at people’s desks, as quickly throw you’d cold call someone be like, hey, look, I need you to look at this right now.

Adriana Romero
And right now, I mean, now I’m not leaving this desk.

Emily Turner
Stand here until you do that. So that was a change, like how I communicated with people needed to be adjusted, even just writing things down like an enablement.

Unknown Speaker
The other big adjustment was

Emily Turner
creating project briefs, like salespeople don’t create project briefs, we write mutual plans. We write DAX like we do things like that, but we don’t really create a project brief or like, what are we going to do with it? So it required a different mindset. And something I’m still working on, is that a little bit of slowing down to then move quickly?

Adriana Romero
Oh, totally. And you brought up some very good points in there about your process and the things that you had to learn. You know, Emily, I’ve been in a woman five years after being in sales for so long. And sometimes I find myself struggling with writing down things for others to read, like, you know, you have your own kind of internal process, you write your notes down, I call them my dirty documents. But then I realized people have to read this, and I have to explain it. And I have to understand, they’re not in my brain, they cannot read me and I’m not just going to close a deal to your point or doing it I actually have to explain my why. Right. So that’s, that’s a big learning. But I wanted to touch on one point, because I was I’ve been having this conversation more and more, and you’re bringing a lot of items that you’re adapting, but I really want to drill deeper into. How was your onboarding process, you know, was, do you feel that when you say, I’m learning of how to go slow to actually then go faster? Do you believe that, you know, your onboarding process actually helped you do that? Do you feel that it was very rushed? Like, it’s it’s been a big topic of conversation about how we enablers onboard not only ourselves, but we onboard other enablers and how I think people are realizing that, oh, we’re not really onboarding enablement, we have to start onboarding enablement. So actually do what you said. Tell me share with me a little bit about that experience of your onboarding. Yeah, so

Emily Turner
I got on boarded. So my my boss said, all the onboard Private one. So he was a little strapped for resources, I’m sure, but I think he did a good job. But it was, the way our onboarding works is you do have three days of company onboarding. And then we did. I did the onboarding with the rest of like the sales cohort that got, which was kind of nice, because one and let me understand, like, what their training looked like, what was going to be important, what were some of those skills, because in moving from companies, people have different sales methodologies and things like that. I really liked that part of it. I’m all about context. And then I was trying to also meet with like a number of other people, and other enablement, functions across the org and things like that, to understand it, but I wouldn’t say that there was like a dedicated like, this is how we enable my lead had to do a lot of that training of like, this is the framework that we typically use, like, this is what it looks like. And because I didn’t have a enablement background, I was very lucky, I work for someone who has a ton of education and actually like adult learning and adult education. So he was able to provide me with that idea, like, these are the frameworks we use, this is why we use that framework. So he sat down and did a lot of that, because otherwise, I would have just been going off of like what I thought made sense, or what I read or done research on. So it was really helpful to have that. But I would say that it was probably an extra like two or three hours that he had to then commit to just like, run me through everything and make sure I was at least on the same page of like, then when I sat in on the sessions, I could see the framework in action, right? Like, let me run you through how we do our sessions. Why do we do it like this? This is our framework, and then now sit in on the sessions and provide feedback on like, did

Unknown Speaker
I follow that framework?

Emily Turner
Did I meet those expectations, which was a really nice learning one. I was very lucky, though, like, I did get 30 basically a full 30 days of programming, because I was doing it with the sales team as well. And we had a big cohort, your cohort of like nine or 10, I

Unknown Speaker
think.

Adriana Romero
So those are the good cohorts and have like good, good big ones. And also, I agree with you, you have you know, great, you know, your leader is a great person super versed in this and enablement. And that creates a very big difference, because I’m pretty sure he also wanted to make you very successful, and giving you every tool, because I know the eagerness you know, you hire somebody and a woman you’re like, I just need you to do things right now, just like when you hire a salesperson, and you just start, you know, closing deals right now. But one thing that I always tell my you know, my frontline managers is we need to let these people crawl before they actually learn how to walk or run, because that’s going to, you know, allow you success, you know, in the future.

Emily Turner
And he was very good at also like pulling me back. Like lots of salespeople, when they join organizations. And we see it, when I do did some of the onboarding for our sales teams last year that like, they just want to jump in, they want to hit the phones, I was that person when I was enabled, as well as like, I just wanna work on stuff like give me your project, give point me at something and give me a to do list like I will tackle it. He was like, No, I want you to just observe, forget, see how it works. See how the pieces all fit together. Like you don’t have to be running at 100 just yet, but you’re gonna have lots of time that will need you to run it 100 or 200 times and build some build some contacts gain some understanding, which is really great in hindsight, but I’m sure a bit challenging for him that I was like, constantly chomping at the bit? Oh, of course, I think

Adriana Romero
I’m pretty sure he expected it. Right. And, you know, I think that you guys, Shopify last year with everything that happened in the world was a lifesaver for a lot of businesses, because, you know, a lot of businesses had to pivot to e commerce, which they might have not thought beforehand. They didn’t have an e commerce strategy. There were a mom and pop shop and they said, Now what are we going to do to survive? Thankfully, Shopify was there, I remember all the good things that Shopify did to help, you know, founders and to pivot into e commerce. But I’m pretty sure that internally, that kind of growth and that type of you know, pivot created a lot of challenges for you guys, you know, and things that people had to learn and people that you know, you had to like, expand. Tell me a little bit what you know, how, what did that growth bring to your team? And how did you guys as enablement address all these, you know, new challenges last year?

Emily Turner
Yeah. So one of the biggest changes was, was that big push for ecommerce. So I worked on the retail team, I was supporting a retail sales team that was focused on working with merchants that only had brick and mortar locations. Interesting. It’s not necessarily an easy conversation to talk to somebody about your point of sale when nobody knows when they’re going to be reopening. Exactly. And so the the team, the focus of the team, the conversations really shifted about being like, how do we get you online quickly so that your business can weather this storm that is COVID and your brick and mortar is kind of still standing on the other side of we’ve made you successful, we’ve helped you grow and expand your customer base. That was a change we had to do a bit more a bit of a backtrack, actually in product updates. So we had to do a bit more training on our core platform. Traditionally, we didn’t do as much core training on our e commerce platform, because so many of our merchants that we worked with our customers are already online customers. And they were exploring the opportunity to bring their brick and mortar retail stores onto the platform as well. So that was a bit of a shift. One, we saw a big change from like, working with existing merchants to working with net new businesses. So again, like a little bit of a change in how you approach them, what are those conversations look like? So we did some training around that. And then, in order to help brick and mortar locations as they reopened, I don’t know if you remember, in May, we launched a new product, we relaunched our POS, we’ve, that was really exciting. So there was a lot of training that went into that with the team, a lot of prep work. So that was a really exciting one, that’s probably one of the first like really large ones. My boss was on parentally for part of it. So he came back, and we kind of had to have all the pieces in place. So we he’d laid a really great foundation for me, he was able to go away knowing that I could tackle some of the smaller logistical pieces. And then we all came back together. It was a successful launch, but it was definitely a change in conversation for sure. Like previously, everything was all about like growth, like that is what Shopify stands for omni channel. And now it was about how do people think about their business or their brick and mortar in different ways. So they can still use it. But online was such a big focus. So that was a big shift. We launched it without any pricing. And then we launched like a paid subscription to it later in the year once things were kind of reopening. And it made sense to so we’d had to do some training on that, right? We’ve gone from being this product that had no additional costs associated with it to selling something with a subscription price. So how do we do the training to make sure our sales team is prepared and well armed for those conversations. So that was a bit of a it was definitely an interesting, an interesting year, we release things very quickly, and we move fast internally. So keeping up can sometimes feel like a bit of a race in and of itself,

Adriana Romero
I am sure and you know, coming coming from from similar backgrounds into like, companies that pivot and that have to act fast. And I think that last year proved that thinking very fast on your feet and having the agility to move those things very fast. You know, approves two things. One, enablement is about progress, not perfection. And we just have to do it. And we started like correcting on, you know, on the fly, sometimes that’s one of the things that we have to do, and how important it is for enablement to be so close to the sales team. Like even though in many cases, you report into the sales leader, if you if you do or if you don’t, it’s so important to stay close and to understand, you know, why are people either learning or not learning doing or not doing just because you have having the pulse on the floor for me is very important. So you know, you do all this and you pivot and you do fast. Tell us a little bit more about the framework that you use Emily in all this and making these pivots?

Emily Turner
Yeah, so we, I found out afterwards, it actually does have a have a real name. It’s not just it’s not just a meta thing. But I think it’s the the closest example to it is probably it’s called like la AP lap,

Unknown Speaker
like, Oh, yeah, yes,

Emily Turner
I know, I practice. So our perform sorry, our programs typically looked a lot of the same way. Like the first week of the month was context building, learning, understanding why we’re doing the training, what do you need to know, all that stuff? Like the start with why what you need to know? And then you move into weeks two, and three, and it’s about putting what you’ve learned into practice? How are you going to do it on calls? How are we making sure that as you’re doing them on calls, you’re doing it correctly? Give me that? And then perform right, like then being able to track like one or we change? Are we moving the needle one way or the other? Are we actually seeing an improvement in the trainings we’ve run? And if we’re not, where are those gaps? I mean, we need to go back and improve on the the program that we built, because our sales teams not seeing the corresponding results. So

Adriana Romero
So metrics, it’s very important for you guys to be very on top of the metrics, how does you know all this and the metrics and all the things I have to pivot? How, tell me a little bit more because all this that you’re that you’re describing to me is very good, but you have to work very closely with your sales managers. Tell me a little bit about how you know, you You guys made all this happen? And how was that kind of conversations and working together with sales managers to make it happen? Yeah, so

Emily Turner
we, we were very lucky. I’ve said this, I think in other enablement, webinars I’ve been in but our senior leadership in retail was very supportive of enablement. They understood the value. They were really on board. They wanted it to be successful. And so we were in like, we attended our weekly sales meetings, even if it was just to listen and observe and understand, like, what were those key priorities that they were then working towards that when we were looking at programs when we were prioritizing programs, if we heard there were two or three things that they really needed to focus on, we could kind of say, Okay, well, these are the programs that are most closely aligned to what sales wants. So just made that trust, easier to gain when you come back and say like, Hey, I know your focus is like, how do I wrap my new hires faster? Well, what we want to focus on this month is building a better onboarding program. So what I need from you is x y Zed, so I can give you reps that ramp faster. So being able to give that give and take back and forth. We also a lot of like, even just a one on one meetings with them. So that that part of it to understand how they like to work with it. What do they expect from it different teams who have different backgrounds with different sales leaders have a different expectation of enablement. Some of them are more accustomed to enablement, being like, the entity like when I worked at Salesforce in some ways, like, it wasn’t really something you saw on a daily basis, like you receive the content from an app, but they weren’t as engaged in others, if they’re from smaller organizations, maybe are more used to enablement, being like hands on. Yeah, right in there with the sales team. So spending the time to understand how people like to work together. But I think the biggest thing was those attending the sales meetings, understanding what their key objectives were, and then building all of our trainings or building them all, and so that when we explain them, they were tied to their objectives versus what I used to do. And I’d get really excited, I was just like, this is gonna be so cool. It’s this great training, we’re launching this awesome thing, I’m so excited, versus being able to say like, we’re launching it because you guys are trying to do X. And we’re gonna support that by doing why,

Adriana Romero
Oh, totally. I, I’ve, I’ve, you know, I’ve learned how important it is to tell people, especially in sales, where time is so valuable, they’re so busy selling and generating revenue for the company, when you tell them, you’re able to tell them, this is going to help you increase your win rate, or this is going to help you handle objections better, and eventually, you know, increase your win rate to or this is going to help you this, they pay much more attention. And I think it’s also goes into how they approach the programs. Because you know, I always tell people, it’s not only about what enablement builds, it’s about how the person who’s taking the training approaches and the mindset they have. And the biggest thing that I think it’s important is what feedback they give you at the end of what worked and what didn’t, and how would they make a difference and maybe hit that number faster or do something right. So Emily, it’s been you know, you’ve had a very exciting 2020, you know, and beginning of 2021, you have learned you pivoted you, you know you were hitting this fast growing Canadian company, that’s so amazing. There’s so many good things happening. And you made that pivot from sales over my account executive to enablement. And you you kind of you kind of took the chance in getting yourself out there, applying for the roles, same with Shopify took the chance on you, which was, you know, very good chance, because you’ve been very successful. But there’s a lot of people out there that are looking to make that move, and they do not know how, what would be your advice to all our fellow, you know, people in sales account management CFOs, or even in other roles in the company who want to move to enablement, what is one tip that you would give them?

Emily Turner
Um, I think it would be to try and collect the information about it, if that makes sense. So, enablement ends up being a lot like change management or project management, which is not something you get a lot of experience. And so I attended like a couple of webinars, or I’d read white papers, or I just like, spent a lot of time doing research like that. But then I also read, I read multipliers and a couple other ones that I got given by by people. So I think that part of it and thinking about why you want to be in enablement, like, I wasn’t running away from being in sales, like I, I’m much happier and in a moment because I get to watch people be successful, which is what I wanted to do, like we talked about at the beginning. So understanding that really helped me understand like, why I wanted to do it, how I was going to talk about it when I was doing interviews with people, how I was going to position myself to potential interviews. So I think that side of it, and then I’m all about research. So that would have been my easy one. Like I would just said, like read all the things that you can get your hands on, probably the only person still going to the Toronto library, but they

Unknown Speaker
have lots of books. It’s

Adriana Romero
funny I heard about one of my colleagues this morning, he was going to the library to get books out so you’re not the only person I think there’s there

Emily Turner
was somebody last year I was going to the library and they’re like, Oh, it’s got a new restaurant.

Unknown Speaker
I don’t think I’ve been yet that’s like,

Emily Turner
oh my god. Like they, they were very sweet. They just thought like nobody goes to the Toronto library anymore. And I guess it’s a great little plug for the Toronto library. It’s a great library. You don’t have to opt anyone. It’s all contactless right now. You just go in, get your delivery. Leave, you can read all kinds of books. So

Adriana Romero
I think you know what coming from a kid that did not grow up in the Wikipedia, Google, you know, era, I had to go to the library to get the information that I needed. Because my parents did not invest in encyclopedias in the house, they said, there’s a library across the school, you go there. And one thing that I love about libraries is the smell of books and smell of books for me is I go into a bookstore or a library, and I am the freak with smelling the books. But there’s nothing, nothing beats that and working in a library is so interesting, because you’re surrounded, I feel like surrounded with all this kind of knowledge, and you’re working in your own space, and you’re in your flow. And you know, nobody will interrupt you because you’re there. So

Emily Turner
one thing I would say I took out before and I don’t know if it helped necessarily with enablement, but I found it helpful in the conversations that I had to learn to have was I read, having hard conversations, and I haven’t had a lot of like hard conversations. Luckily, I guess in my in my role, but it just helped to better understanding how to communicate with people who maybe don’t communicate the same way you do. So if you’re looking that I found was a big thing that I learned and enablement that I appreciate any kind of extra knowledge around like when I’m looking at books I want to read like, how do you communicate with people who don’t, as you said, like, they’re not in your head, and they’re not like that. So that would be one of the books that I would suggest reading as weird as it may sound, because it’s not related to enablement. At all. I think some of those learnings about communicating with people who are stressed or heated or feeling emotions, which salespeople and other people in roles often are. It was a really great book.

Adriana Romero
That’s great advice. And I think that in enablement, we play so many roles. I Kelly, kind of like the counselor role and enablement. Sometimes you have to act like a therapist, you have to sit down and listen to people and sometimes you have to help them realize their own thing. So I think that gain gauging all these skills is super important. I have a story where you know, my previous job, we had a room where there was actually like a chef’s mom, and people would actually sometimes have one on ones with me in there. And I call it the therapy room. It was great. Um, anyway, Emily, this has been such a good conversation. I love everything you have shared from your journey, how you pivoted, the tips that you have given into like the skill sets what you have read how you research, even going into the library. I love that as well. But I wanted to get to know a little bit more about Emily and what she likes. So because you’re a book fan, I love to go into this rabbit fire. I’m going to ask you a few questions. Tell us more about what you’re reading right now.

Emily Turner
So I’m reading two books because I read a fiction and a nonfiction book is at the same time. So I am reading The Taming of the queen. I’m about to start it by Philippa Gregory. It’s historical fiction. I’m a bit of a history nerd. And then I’m reading switch by NTP, how to change things when Change is hard. It’s a bit of a change management book. So and they wrote me distech which was a sales letter.

Unknown Speaker
Yes. So

Adriana Romero
that’s what I’m let me know what you like, if you like switch. I haven’t I’ve had it in my audible list for a while. So it’s part of like if it takes priority. Tell us about podcasts. Do you listen to podcasts?

Emily Turner
I do. I love podcasts. I listen to a lot of non work related podcasts. So I am very into nutrition on the side. So my favorite podcast is by a British Doctor Who has a master’s in nutrition and dietary wellness. And it’s called the food medic. And she’s actually Irish, I guess she’s not British, but she practices in the UK, okay brings in experts from around the world about all different things is related to like health and nutrition and wellness. I really like that. And then I actually also love a podcast called you’re not so smart, which talks about a number of different topics and themes. And I think I’ve cited I was listening to one about talking to people it’s called talking to people I think is the name of the episode. And it’s really about negotiation. And I think I’ve cited it in the last like three or four sales trainings. This is so good. Everyone has been hearing about it. It’s just it’s all there. prac not maybe not quite practical knowledge, but it’s real world knowledge that I think is applicable to what I do in sales or business and stuff. So I like having that balance, but it’s a great one. You are not so smart. It’s a very catchy opening song. So

Adriana Romero
it’s always good when they have catchy songs. Yeah, I love that. That’s so true. I use a lot of dating analogies when I’m doing training. I really find a lot of analogies between sales and dating. You know, we can talk a little bit more about that. Chocolate or candy. Ooh,

Emily Turner
I am definitely a chocolate person. I try to avoid having chocolate too much chocolate in the house. But there’s always chocolate in my house, because you never know when you might need it but I hoard it so that there’s always a nobody else finds it or you hoard it so you don’t have it so easily. I heard it so that other people don’t find it growing up my mom and my sister would eat my chocolate because I always save the chocolate until there’s more chocolate to replace the chocolate.

Adriana Romero
Please get in your pipeline, right? That’s how you manage your chocolate, right?

Emily Turner
forecasting for potential chocolate needs in the future is what I’m doing.

Adriana Romero
I love that I actually want a pivot it because I’m a chocolate person myself. And I decided only to buy 80% chocolate because A, it’s not that bad. And if I have like two squares, it’s okay. B my husband does not like it. So it’s good because I also heard it from other people in the house. And I have it I have like a cabinet where I just put that chocolate and put it up there. And it’s like, I have to really think about it. I’m like, Yes, it is a day I need chocolate so I will go and get it and eat it. And I’ve also found some healthier alternatives to like Nutella because buying Italian this house meant I would eat it all but I found this Greek store in my little town and she has a chocolate tahini. Ooh, that sounds amazing. So it’s tahini. So it sesame it’s really good for you. And they have it has like dark cocoa. It’s so good.

Unknown Speaker
I love that. Yeah,

Emily Turner
I find that I have all kinds of like little like, banana and peanut butter or like this. And that’s odd. I’m like, I get something sweet. Because I do have that sweet tooth but I’m not I don’t need to like break into the chocolate. But there are many eggs hiding in my house right now because I’m a little obsessed.

Adriana Romero
That happens you know when when it’s terrible for me when my daughter goes trick or treating and Halloween because she doesn’t eat chocolate. So you know. So I basically I what I do is I just keep the ones I like which is typically the coffee, Chris. And then you know I give all the other ones to my husband and say you can eat these because I don’t need all those calories.

Adriana Romero
You you get fat not me.

Adriana Romero
I mean, what’s your pet peeve? What is it that can make Emily you know, not be so happy and fun?

Emily Turner
at work in Slack, we use slack a lot. I think most people are familiar with it or like whatever your tool is, drives me nuts when people ask a question in a large group. And the question has been asked like

Unknown Speaker
right above it.

Unknown Speaker
Nobody asks the question.

Emily Turner
That’s probably my biggest one at work to be honest, outside of work. drives me nuts when people come over to my house and they like leave my cupboards open.

Unknown Speaker
I love this. I just love this. This is so good. Very weird pet peeves, but they’re very like they both just like grate on me a little bit. So

Adriana Romero
I know that the slack one is also annoys me It annoys me when people say Can you respond in the thread and they start responding outside of the thread? It’s

Unknown Speaker
like, Wait,

Unknown Speaker
come on.

Adriana Romero
It’s so easy. Anyway, Emily, it’s been such a pleasure having you here today. Is there anything else you want to share with you know, our fellow enablers and audience this Friday? afternoon already?

Unknown Speaker
lots of time it’s um,

Emily Turner
I think we’ve covered most of it. If you’re thinking of being an enabler, I would say it’s a great switch if you’re not someone in England or you have any questions, I guess for anyone who’s watching this maybe not in in England, and is thinking of making the move. Always happy to chat about what the experience has been. But otherwise, thank you so much for having me on.

Unknown Speaker
Adriana. I

Emily Turner
really appreciate it and have a wonderful weekend.

Unknown Speaker
Enjoy you too.

Adriana Romero
They can they can people connect with you on LinkedIn. Is that good?

Unknown Speaker
Yeah. Perfect. Sorry.

Adriana Romero
Amazing. Thank you everybody. This has been an amazing coffee collaboration and enablement today, February. Hopefully this will get warmer as we move to the next session. And thank you so much for joining us today and have a fantastic