Chad Dyar is the Director of Sales Enablement at Prometric.  In this conversation with The Collaborator, Chad guided us through what is win loss analysis, how to create a win/loss analysis process, an overview of the win loss analysis questionnaire, and many other aspects of a great win loss analysis process.

1️⃣To do this well, you need to have a tight sales process and clarity of what you are trying to achieve.  Try to start the process right around the contract portion of your process, perhaps a bit earlier.  This is when your sales team introduces you and gets verbal/written confirmation from your main contact that after the deal is done, win or lose, they will chat with your Enablement team about the deal.

2️⃣The win/loss meeting should be around 30-60 minutes in length and be done with the main contact your seller was working with.

3️⃣At the end of win/loss conversation, get permission to reach back out for follow-up as required.

4️⃣So, what are the general areas you walk through during these conversations.

?What was the buying process like?  What prompted their awareness of the problem? How did you start looking for solutions to the problem?  Who was involved in the buying process?

?What competitors did you check out?  How did you determine who to talk to?  What did we do well, our advantages?  What did they do well, their advantages?

5️⃣Use these conversations to remind the customer of why you are so awesome.  If you lost the deal, make sure you also ask when you can reach back out to them.

There are lots of gold nuggets in here — Give a listen and remain curious.

Audio Transcript

The Collaborator 

Like, I’m super stoked to have you here for the for the two people in enablement who don’t know who you are. Tell us a little bit about yourself, you know, what do you do and all of those good things chat.

Chad Dyar 

I have been referred to as financial enablement, because I tend to show up at most functions sit in the back and have have some laughs with people. So I know a lot of people in the space. But my The, the dime tour of my past is I went to school for music, I was a professional opera singer, which is a weird way to get into enablement. There’s a lot of people in the field that have similar backgrounds and performing. And after performing for a while I took a little break, I got a sales job and I never looked back I sold for years and years and years, I became a sales leader. I moved into sales operations. And then I found enablement, which I consider to be my forever home. It took all of the different pieces of being a performer being being an educator, being a salesperson, being a leader, and then having the operational background a little bit of Lean Six Sigma mixed in and now I get to do what I love to do every day, which is help people be their best selves at work and sell better and just build a better culture inside of companies for salespeople.

The Collaborator 

What an amazing background Do you still sing at all?

Chad Dyar 

Absolutely.

Chad Dyar 

Every single day, I was singing Christmas carols up into the minute I dialed in.

Chad Dyar 

I love it.

The Collaborator 

This is the year for me, I know where I’m looking for any joy I can find. And usually I’m a little bit of a humbug when it comes to the Christmas songs. I’m like, Okay, I’m not ready for him this year. I was like October like I start playing him. I don’t care.

Chad Dyar 

My trees been up for weeks.

The Collaborator 

Awesome. Let’s dive into it. So you work at prometric now, right? I do. And how long have you been there Chad?

Chad Dyar 

I got there. In August of this year. I actually lived in New York for years and years and years. And this summer, I quarantine down in Charleston at the beach. And after a couple of months on the beach. I was like I think I’m a beach guy. So I moved my stuff down from New York and I found a new opportunity working fully remote at proprofs at prometric.

The Collaborator 

That’s so awesome. What was enablement? Like when when you started? Were you the first one were you joining a team? You know what, what did that look like?

Chad Dyar 

So I feel like I’ve enablement at prometric specifically or just

The Collaborator 

for metric is specifically.

Chad Dyar 

So I’m the first hire for enablement there. So I’m actually building out the function ground up. So it has been really fun. The second week I was there, there was an onboarding class. So they got me a weekend before and said, hey, what can we do to start structuring this onboarding program? So one weekend, and I’m helping put together a new onboarding program, and then a couple of weeks after that was our was our commercial organization kickoff? So I led the kickoff. I got to meet everybody, virtually. So yeah, I got trolled by fire getting in the door. Now we’re seeing foundational elements you got thrown right in

The Collaborator 

how do you figure out? I mean, you started it You touched upon what I was wondering right away is, how do you start figuring out out of the plethora of things that we do, how to start prioritizing what to work on? Well,

Chad Dyar 

a lot of it is you lean into your leadership, you find out what’s important to them what they’re trying to build, and then you find the place to create some quick wins, like restructuring, onboarding is always a quick win, especially when a company is in a growth, really heavy growth. You know, yeah, regrown a lot. So I came in, and I’ve had five onboarding classes since I started. So every month, it’s a group of people that I get to work closely with, meet them. And then every month we’re also figuring stuff out together, like what did we miss in the last class, what information could be better, what pre presentations can be tighter, so it just gets better and better and better every class and I’m learning to do it remote as well. Let’s see other new challenges. enablers are generally on site in the mix list. Now, being part therapist, you know, part efficiency expert, and in this setting, I take any chance I can get to spend time with people and having all the new hires come through and meet me first, it helps me develop all of those relationships that make me feel like my part of my company, even though I’m not in the same room with people.

The Collaborator 

That’s so cool, though, Woody, are you? You’ve been doing this for a while, you have a great, amazing background, so you have a lot of experiences to pull on. But what’s really surprised you the most out of this this new time at prometric during the pandemic, onboarding all these new people have you? Have you been learning new things that are exciting you

Chad Dyar 

I’m learning new things non stop, because right now, it’s taking everything I’ve ever done in Evernote, and translating it into the remote version of that when I can’t be in the room when I’m not able to collaborate with a tap on the shoulder. Like I’m used to sitting between two people in an office. One side was solutions. The other side was marketing. And I’m able to bounce back and forth and get whatever I need. I mean, your title says it all enablement is the most collaborative function inside of a company because we generally sit between everyone else pulling things together to help enable people so it’s like marketing resources, solutions, resources product, and then spending time with sales people to find out what they need and what’s working and doing All remote is its own learning curve. So it basically feels like I’m starting with a library of resources but at Ground Zero with know how

The Collaborator 

I was gonna say, is there anything for you, Chad, that you’re seeing that crap, I used to be able to count on this? And I don’t mean physically being near somebody, but are there certain tactics or approaches, they like crap. They’re just not working for me right now. Um,

Chad Dyar 

I think a lot of training is changed. Because, yeah, there’s a lot of reading people and the function of enablement, you spend a lot of time getting people to learn. And when you’re in a room with people, even virtually when you’re doing it occasionally, in smaller groups, it’s one thing because you can pay attention to people, you can now signals, you can see their body language, I can’t captivate people anymore, I can’t put them in a room and close the door and make them listen to me, they’re going to be on the other end of the computer with kids and dogs and aligners and everything else. So that’s one of the bigger challenges is just making sure they’re going to learn and retain what we’re going through in any of the any of the training that we’re doing.

The Collaborator 

Nice, nice. You know, I, um, I wanted to specifically spend some time with you really digging into win loss analysis, because, to me, it’s such a powerful tool, but I don’t see a lot of people doing it or doing it well. And and I’m gonna put myself in that camp right now. I don’t think we’re doing particularly well, at our win loss analysis approach. So I’m hoping to steal every idea you’ve ever had, man. And and hopefully everybody else can, too. Well, you know, when you’ve done win loss analysis in the past? What kind of approach Have you taken in terms of getting people? Did you have to convince people that this was important to do? Or do people already say, Chad, let’s do this.

Chad Dyar 

I think people always think it’s important. I think people don’t want to bother people, especially if they lose, there’s a little bit of soreness on the last side it’s like, or else they create an experience, maybe they don’t feel comfortable taking the extra step of asking for the conversation after. But one of the things that I’ve done since the very beginning, because that was customer facing and sales. And as a sales leader, I don’t like to lose my relationships with our buyers, I still want to be able to talk to people understand, because the thing is the markets change right now. And you know, COVID days, people are just thinking differently about things. And now and now I can’t rely on you know, 20 years of history of knowledge. It’s really I got to get into the now what’s motivating people? And and I’ll answer your question, there’s a lot of blockers to getting this done. What if you don’t have a tight process that can be recreated across a few people over time, it blows apart, you don’t just want to have a candid conversation with people, you want to give them something structured to go through, and you want to keep it consistent. So when you’re building the data set on the back of it, it’s measurable, you want to be able to say this is where we went, this is where we lose, and then have those apples to apples comparisons and say I talked to 12 people last quarter, and the wind loss side, here’s how many wins are so many losses. here’s the here’s the one, the one slide of everything I learned. And then here’s the takeaways, and then at QPR is at the quarterly business reviews where we get the teams together for their account strategy meetings, we can lay out those wins and losses and all that Intel to them so that they get into that mindset, as we’re strategizing about our future opportunities.

The Collaborator 

What do what does the process look like, when it’s working? Well, you know, can you walk us so let’s say you just want a deal. Or maybe it starts earlier than that, or you just got to start

Chad Dyar 

earlier than that, if you wait till it’s over, you generally Miss people, because they they’re tired of talking to you at that point. So yeah, usually towards the last stage of the deal, the last maybe two stages of the deal, the concept has to be introduced, I like it right around when the contracts going out when you’re getting into that last mile discussion to say, whichever way this deal goes, we want we want you to speak with with somewhere in our enablement team just to talk about the process is a great learning opportunity for us to be able to take back and it’s either going to help us better serve you now as a customer if it’s a win, or it’s gonna help us better address some of the reasons we didn’t measure up this time so that we can create those opportunities for you to win you back in the future. And I think with that approach, and it’s a positive mindset, too, it’s not a let’s get in a dig into the things that we didn’t do. Well, it’s a how do we create a learning opportunity about for our team through this experience, so you get them on board before you close? Once they close? They expected our role is whoever manages that opportunity. That account has to get verbal consent to for me to reach out and send the meeting. So either by a call or by text, something beyond just here’s an email introduction, we hope it works out because early on within the email introductions, and then it’s just tag tag, tag tag, nothing ever happens. And you got to do these right after the deal closes. While everything’s fresh. People aren’t just thinking about one vendor all day long. Like once this deal is done, they’re back to the day job, or whatever the next project is you want to get on why everything’s fresh on their mind.

The Collaborator 

And so many of us lose sight of that. Because we’re thinking about ourselves all day long doesn’t mean anybody else’s. So absolutely. Oh, you so you start the introduce the concept. You know about the contract stage, you get the more formal introduction, people on board with it. So you sat down with let’s say you sit down with a customer that you just won, what sorts of things are you asking them about exploring I’m trying to uncover their chat.

Chad Dyar 

So I want to get everything.

Chad Dyar 

I know I want to know how

Chad Dyar 

many people are on the buying team, I want to know what their buying process is what their procurement looks like. That’s why they were in the market in the first place. Like, I want to get as much I want to squeeze as much as I can squeeze as much juice as I can from that free. Well, I have him on the line, because that’s going to tell me who our customers are, where they’re going, like when you decided to make a move in this direction. Where did you look? First? Were you online? Were you talking to colleagues? Were you going to conferences. So when you start digging out all of those little pieces as little nuggets, then you start to learn, oh, we should put our marketing dollars here, or, or even thinking into the sales process and their experience with anybody on the accounting that they work with? Like right on a scale of one to 10? What do they do, right? What do they do wrong? And then that feedback goes directly back to whoever’s been working with them. And I’ll tell you, I’m really lucky right now. Because nine out of 10 times, I get nines and 10s, for all the salespeople. So I know they’re doing a great job. Yeah, really keeping people engaged, which is exactly what we want to hear. And then you find this little, there’s little nuggets in there of why maybe they didn’t go with us, or even if they did, I loved you guys, except for this one thing, really, I didn’t think was great. And even the negative feedback from the people that decided to go with us, it’s stuff that we can address really quickly. And it gives me a wide variety of things to enable for the sales organization to really look at and say, oh, here’s the exact thing that we can focus on in the next couple of months to make sure this doesn’t happen again. And if we can look at how many times that’s coming up in wins or losses, and see where we can turn those over, we can actually measure the impact we’re having just through this one little project, where I just get on the phone and yap with somebody for half an hour, try to build a good relationship. But the other secret to this john is have to build a good relationship, you have to build rapport. And then at the end of that call, you have to get permission to follow up if you need to, because I’m coming in and out of the blue in these calls. I wasn’t a part of all the deal, I have Salesforce. But I don’t have the nuance of every conversation. After I wrap with them. I say Hey, can I get permission to email you for point of clarification? If I have one? And 10 out of 10 times I have to get back with them again? Because something they said or something they told me once the team sees it, they’re like, can you dig into this a little bit further? Can you find out Really? What’s behind this? And once you get there, or else they’re like, Can you take one more swing and find out who that competitor was? Can you take one more swing and find out? So I think building that relationship is also critical. And this isn’t my first rodeo with that I’ve been spending time on site with customers before you know pandemic days to build those relationships. So I could continue this conversation

The Collaborator 

and you’re clearly a personable person, Chad, I have a feeling you don’t have a problem striking up a conversation with anybody, for any period of time on anything, which is wonderful. And I think a great skill to have. If you’re not as comfortable with that in your role, it sounds like what would you recommend the importance of having that template for a softer run through is probably critical.

Chad Dyar 

And he is important for me too, it’s friendly as I am if I didn’t have a set of guidelines, because I’m looking at 30 minutes on a calendar with a C level executive in a company. And I know how important their time is. And if I can’t get everything I need in that 30 minutes, because you just hit the nail on the head, I could have a 10 minute conversation about the weather and the beach with them before we even get into it because I like to talk. So I have to be able to keep the thing on schedule. And I think that doesn’t matter what your personality is, it’s the approach, which is getting getting permission, making sure that they see the value in it. And then having having all of those questions down to it to science so that you’re not just staring at your notes the whole time. I mean, I performed so I’m an actor, I can remember I can memorize. And I think memorizing those before I go in is also helpful because I can take detailed notes and not just be back and forth screen to screen, because you want to stay engaged with them. So familiarize yourself with what you’re trying to learn. And then you also have to be able to do a little bit of improv, which means that they say something that sparks you can’t just go to the next question you have to dig and dig and dig, sometimes they’ll give you gold. And sometimes I’ll get to question three out of 10. And stop, because that’s when they start saying, well, your competitor did this and I’m like they did and then we start digging into the whole relationship with a competitor. And let’s go.

The Collaborator 

And I get that from this podcast. You know, I’ll always prep with yours, you know, 10 questions I want to run through. And usually I’ll get through three or four and somebody who exactly like you said, say something like, crap, let’s talk about that. And then everything else goes out the window. So that’s a really important reminder. Who are the typical people you’re talking to? Is it is it the champion is that the economic buyer, you know, in terms of profile of who you’re ideally connecting with, at the customer, or the buyer, the winner or loss? Who was the ideal person you reach out to? Or is it multiple people?

Chad Dyar 

It’s generally the single person with the strongest relationship to the person in our organization. Whoever sales was working directly with and the thing is, because they already have that relationship I get I get lots of persona work done, because I asked them who else is on your team who was In the decision team, who else has to approve this? Who else reviewed it with you, and I start getting names and titles. And suddenly I have this little profile of the buying team together. And I’m like, Okay, now when we’re looking to go into our next deal, this is the one person that usually gets us our mobilizer. This is the person that helps us, you know, get in the door and get some speed going. And then here’s the other four people that we need to figure out how to engage and get on our side as well. And it doesn’t always mean beaten on their door with an SDR or with a marketing campaign. Sometimes it’s like, Where are your people going to get their Intel? Oh, yeah, they’re going here. Well, let’s create some references in that space, or they’re looking at webinars, they’re going to this conference, let’s make sure we have a presence there. So it’s really about just listening to where they are, where they’re meeting each other and learning about stuff like us enablers, we go and spend time together in these groups. And we buy technology that are recommended by our friends and people that we trust. We build programs, leveraging the knowledge, the people we trust, and our buyers, our customers do the same thing. So we just have to figure out how we can be present in those places.

The Collaborator 

What are some of the are there? And I’m guessing the answer’s no, Chad, but I got to ask, are there one or two types of questions that you find consistently deliver the gold?

Chad Dyar 

Anything related to process, and anything relating to consideration of competitors? So I think process is great, because it’s nice to learn how they like soup to nuts. Where do they start? Like when did the problem come up? When did they decide it was even something to think about? And then how did they get to the point where they’re talking to us. So that’s the blank space that we want to fill in, which is

Chad Dyar 

we don’t know what’s happening before

Chad Dyar 

that we don’t know any of that. So that and that’s cool, because it’s the trigger to get into the market, which is universal. So if we start to figure out what those triggers are, yeah, that’s where we start to position ourselves, oh, when we see this, when we hear this, when this pops up on social media, that’s when we need to start jumping in or when they’re searching for these types of things. There’s tons of marketing tech out there now where we can start to look at where people are spending their time. And that’s just specific knowledge on triggering into the market. So anything on the process side love that love to hear what they’re doing love to see how consistent it is across several different customers, their buying processes are the same, the same types of roles are involved in the process. And then the other one, and this is the biggest one is what are your competitors doing? Who else are they talking to? Why do they like them better than you? And the thing is, even when you when you go back and say, I know you were talking to these two competitors, as well, where did they have an advantage over us in the process? What What made you consider them and put them in league with us. And getting that feedback helps as well gives you a great story of how we win, because we can say, well, we just won this deal with this customer. And they said they went with us over this one. Because of this. I mean, you get permission to use those types of statements, or you’re building those types of references out. It’s a powerful tool.

The Collaborator 

Yeah, no, it’s a very powerful tool. I love that. Is there anything that in your opinion, you know, these conversations, the stories are powerful. You said early on, though, and I think it’s really smart, what data you want to collect. So it’s not just about the stories that you’re hearing and can share? What sort of data should people be thinking about, in your opinion, in terms of you know, the ones and zeros that they want to store in their CRM or elsewhere to learn from.

Chad Dyar 

So when I’m thinking about CRM data store, I’m thinking on the contact strategy First, the who, how many people because the thing is, you want to have all of those buyers in your CRM, getting drip campaigns being called, you want to have the right titles in there, not just the person that’s going to be the champion in the deal, but anyone else that you’re gonna have to wrangle in to make the decision. So you want to get all those all those buyers in, then, like I said, the process piece, you want to learn how people procure new technology, and start to figure out how you can streamline that across all the experiences you’re having. Because some companies, you know, you have the weird red line situation, you have the weird nine other places have to agree you have the it, you have the weird security people in the IT people like you have lots of different variations of that. And to be able to build out a roadmap of any institution on adventure, being able to have every one of those decision tree in point set to say, here’s the craziest procurement process, here’s the easiest, and here’s everything in between. So you’re going to get a lot of that information, you’re not going to get a lot of ones and zeros. The only ones and zeros I get are on a scale of one to 10 or on a scale of zero to 100. I asked those types of questions got experience. So that’s basically my experience survey. How great was your sales rep. Who else was in the process? How well did they do doing their job from from your viewpoint, so really just understanding all the people they interacted with in the company, what those experiences were the positives and the negatives. And then at the end of it, you set them up for a referral, which I think is the biggest number because you want to have a very long list of people that are very excited to work with you as referenceable clients. So I think getting all that excitement out on the call. And that’s that’s my other secret sauce. customers don’t listen, I hope you don’t listen. But my goal is to get them very excited about working with us and bringing all the positive stuff up and making sure to reiterate everything that they say that’s positive, repeat it back to them. Oh, really, we’re blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, get them in the mindset of how cool we are, how great we are. And then on the last calls, do the same thing, because because I want to leave every last call with when’s the next time we can call you. We’re going to take everything we learned today, we’re gonna reach out to you, you know, when it’s time for renewal or time for whatever the next step is, what do we need to learn between now and then to earn your business? and

The Collaborator 

smart chat? So smart right there? What do we need? When can we reach back out to you so smart? Because you lose these deals all the time, and you’re like, crap, they went with a competitor? Hopefully, in three years, we can reach back out, yeah, but you’re actually saying, Hey, you know, hopefully, you’ve had a good conversation. Hopefully, that gives you that information back. And if they do, right there, you know, reach back out, you know why you’ve lost, you know, all the information, you need to do a much better job the next time around. So it’s brand. Let me let me switch to a more tactical piece of this for a second. I’m an I’m in a company, not me personally, but I’m an enablement person listening to this. And I say crap, I just love everything Chad just said, but it sounds to me like these, this 30 minute conversation could take me three hours to understand all this stuff. How do you narrow it down? I mean, are there places that first off, you recommend, hey, look at this website, because here’s a great template I found, or stuff that you can advise people to get started so that it’s not a three hour conversation. It truly is a powerful 30 minute.

Chad Dyar 

Okay, so here’s the here’s the pro tip, someone inside of your company, buy stuff all the time, someone in your company is a buyer of technology, whether it’s you or someone else, put your list of questions together with them and review it. So talk to someone who is in your space in a safe place, and go through the template and say, and then you’re able to just workshop it before it goes out the door. And my current role, I inherited it, I walked in the door, they said, here’s what we want to do. And they gave me a template. And my last row, it was not 30 minutes, it was on site for an hour. And I would sit down and we talked about the weather, it literally anything that we wanted to go through. And we had all the time in the world. It was relaxed. I was working with small businesses. So I would go into the small business was a restaurant, I’d order food, I’d sit down with the owner and ask questions. So I think it’s different than it was the last time because it was more in person relaxed and building that rapport. Now I walked in the door and they said, here’s the template. And all I’ve done is just take the template and put it into my words and looked at it and said, what are we trying to get out of this experience? And then I only tinker with it, just to make sure that we’re going to get the results. And then it’s going to be comfortable, comfortable for me to deliver those questions and get the answers that I need. And it literally is just a step by step. How did you get in the market? Who are the people involved in the buying process? What Why did you go with us? Why didn’t you go with us? Who did you go with? Why? You know, it’s it’s pretty straightforward questions like there’s nothing in it. That’s magic. There’s nothing in it. That’s completely shocking and surprising. I wish I could tell you, I had this one question that I asked. And it gets me all the answers. But it’s just the same group of questions. And it’s literally what do you want to know? And then getting them comfortable to give you the answers.

The Collaborator 

And I love that and the way you just walked through a chat. Anybody can replicate that? You know, it’s exactly just follow them model. It’s a very easy thing to set up. If you are, um, we talked about where as these things in the process, we talked about how to set it off. any surprises on your side, you know, over the last year in terms of Geez, I would have never thought we would learn this kind of information. And I don’t need specific.

Chad Dyar 

I do I do have one of those. Yeah, wow. Okay, so we deal a lot in RFPs, which is not something that I dig too deeply into, because that’s on the technical side, I’m really hyper focused on on the sales process, like you’re working with our people, I want to make sure that their skills are up to par. The materials we’re reviewing look good, like I’m thinking of all the things that live in my world. And our fee is not one of them. But I had this fantastic call with someone, Chief Chief Technical Officer, very technical, pulled up in the RFP while he was on the call pulled up in the competitors and then went line by line going through telling me where we were better and where they were better, like all the way from top to bottom. And I just was captivated because I was like, I didn’t even realize, Wow, we have a we have a fantastic team that handles RFPs we have a fantastic process. But that information I got a ton out of and I wasn’t expecting it totally unexpected took me way off my scorecard into just this whole other conversation. And I took maybe more notes in that meeting that I’ve ever taken in any other one, like literally sore handed then from scribbling the entire time.

The Collaborator 

That’s brilliant, though. I mean, what a great source of competitive Intel in that case.

Chad Dyar 

Oh yeah.

The Collaborator 

And you wouldn’t have gotten it any other way. Let me ask you this, Chad. This has been gold this whole conversation has been gold. What happened we explored, you know, especially around this specific topic that did I choose john, I want to make sure people are aware of this or thinking about By

Chad Dyar 

making it actionable, I think that the challenge on the other side of it is taking it back to the team. So I have I have two different lanes, I run with this. And we’re launching now. So I’m not I’m not telling you from experience past, this is new, it’s coming. But this is the approach that we’re taking. One is run through our content management system. Every time we do one of these, we put together a single slide with the questions, the answers, quotes, major takeaways, publish it out through our content management system, people get eyes on wind loss, here’s what happens dollar amount company, who do we talk to? What do we learn, and then after a quarters worth of those where ideally, you’re getting a dozen or more, hopefully more on the wind side, then I take all of that, and I look at it, and I do line by line comparisons, and basically put a document together saying where we won, where we lost what we learned, and then at the QPR is, I’m able to present that to the sales team as actionable insights. So it’s not just about doing it and sharing it out, because it’s great to learn. But if you don’t see enough trends through customers, then I can’t take every single one of these and make it a project, I learned this one thing, and now it’s gonna be a training course, I learned this one thing, and now it’s gonna be an asset. But if I do enough of them, and I see themes, then that’s like, we’re really missing the ball on this competency, that we could do a better job at Discovery to get enough information to put them into a better solution, we could do a better job at XYZ negotiation at the end of the contract, knocking down our competitors. I mean, there’s a lot of insights that we can take from it. But I need to see those trends before I throw all the time and resources into really building something robust out for the sales. And that’s so

The Collaborator 

important for all of us to keep in mind, we’re finite number of resources, were usually a small team, in most of our roles, most of our businesses. So you have to really be about where you focus your energy. You probably also Washington, let me ask you, do you ever discovered stuff in your past lives even, we’re like, geez, I gotta feed this back to the product team or to our finance team is it usually you know, mostly sales, but you discover stuff that ripples throughout the organization, it’s always product,

Chad Dyar 

it’s, you’re going to get product insights more than anything, and that’s always going to come up. Like I said, I focused, I try to keep my focus in the direction of the people that I’m responsible for. But when all that other stuff comes up, I’m gonna have marketing insights, they’re gonna love some webinar, they’re gonna love some video, the last call I did was just like, I made the decision to talk to you based on this awesome video that I saw. And I was like, Hey, we got highlight that that’s a video that someone saw that put them into the sales process. So you have to highlight that for marketing, any product insights, you get all of our account team members, our solutions team or proposal team, all the people that work together to get these deals across the line. They need those insights as well. So I focus it on sales, sales process, the salesperson they work with, but I keep the questions broad enough. And I add a little bit more flavor around all the people they work with to be able to deliver. There’s other insights as well, when I get them.

The Collaborator 

This is huge Chad, it really is. And it’s one of the single biggest processes and tools in our tool belt if we can actually use it effectively. So I know I need to go back. Because I’ve learned a few things here that I’m gonna steal. I mean, a night yeah, borrow steal. Yeah. And everybody else should to chat. if people have questions for you. I know you’re all over the place. Um, is LinkedIn, the best place though, for people to reach out and say, Hey, Chad, I’d love to learn more.

Chad Dyar 

So I haven’t left this house in mind. They can reach me any way they want to anything they could find on LinkedIn, they can reach me, I would, I’d say LinkedIn is easiest way, I will tell you, I’m going to give some advice to all of my buddies out there. I love engaging with people on LinkedIn. But if you don’t have questions, or insights are answers and you just blast me to sell me something. You’re not gonna get anywhere. So if you want to sell me something great, make sure it’s cool but get to know me and my business and what I’ve what my needs are first. So that’s that’s my only prerequisite because the last time I did one of these, I literally got like, a couple dozen, like sales pitches on LinkedIn. So yeah, I want to share insights, I want to talk to my enablement community. I’m happy to help sales people love to share but

The Collaborator 

come at me the right way. And what Chad just said is good advice for anybody trying to reach out to people on LinkedIn, when the first or second dm message is, is I want to have a sales call with you. Delete. Dad, thank you so much. Thank you so much. This was fantastic. We will be in touch and thank you everybody for stopping and listening today. Reach out to Chad, but don’t sell him anything. All right. Take care chat. Bye bye.

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