Blaire Hervey is the Sales Productivity & Readiness Lead, Digital Native Business & Games, at AWS.  In this conversation with The Collaborator, she share her thoughts and insights on the power of diverse teams to drive big results, as well as how we can do a better job of recruiting, nurturing, and growing teams that are more diverse.

Amongst other things, we explored:

1️⃣ How we need to open up our approaches on how, and where, we recruit for talent in our businesses.

2️⃣ The types of resources we can create, and how to go about creating them, to support not just diversity and inclusion, but belonging, so that people stay and grow in their careers at your business.

And honestly, too many tips and insights to share, you’ll have to give a listen.

Audio Transcript

The Collaborator
Before you introduce yourself, or as you introduce yourself, share with people what you just told me, but your first initial and your last name because I love that.

Blaire Hervey
Thank you. So yeah, a few years ago, I really, I guess, dove into my own brand and my own marketing. And I realized, if you take the first initial of my first name, which is B, and the first three letters of my last name, just her, you get be her, which tells you a lot about my own personal brand, which is all about empowering women. So I love what God did there. That worked out very well.

The Collaborator
One for God.

The Collaborator
Blair, that’s wonderful.

Blaire Hervey
Thank you. Thank you. Um, so a little bit about myself. I was born in Dallas, Texas, raised in Louisville, Kentucky. That’s how you know I’m from there, because I say it with my mouth full. I say it the right way. Louisville. Yep, launched my career, my sales career, mostly sales tech career in Atlanta, Georgia. And then I have been in Vancouver, Washington for about two and a half years now. So I have bopped around. I’ve taken each city, each state and all of the experiences and culture with me. And now I would say I’m truly a sales enablement leader. And I truly focus on empowering women and helping them navigate these challenging experiences within corporate spaces. So that’s just a little bit about me and I, I’m also a mom of a 17 year old, was going to OSU next year.

Unknown Speaker
Oh my god.

The Collaborator
Now I have two daughters, 25 and 28. And I look like I have daughters. You don’t look like you have a 17 year old. So

Blaire Hervey
I’ll take that as a huge compliment. Well, yes, thank you. It’s a blessing no matter what age.

The Collaborator
Amen. Hey, let me ask you this. Let’s just dive into it then. So, you know, one of the things that I started recently, and I really started with my co conspirators, Robert Jefferson it to mirror Macmillan, a new series on equity, inclusion and belonging. And we started this for a couple of reasons we started it because A, there’s too many people just talking about it, and not enough people doing something about it. So what we want to really do is do something that provides actionable insights every time. But this wasn’t about me. This was about you. So what I wanted to ask you, just then your opinion a little bit in terms of what you see in terms of differences between diversity and inclusion? And what are your thoughts on that whole conversation? and not the whole conversation? Because we don’t have five years? Oh, that time? Oh, and but you’re on that specifically? Maybe?

Blaire Hervey
Yeah, and I love what you said about action, and actually having to do the things right. So diversity is something that naturally exists. We’re all different, whether it’s gender, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, abled body, Enos, the way we think all of those things naturally exist. Diversity is their inclusive inclusion and inclusivity takes action, it’s actually saying that we need these particular individuals at the table in these rooms, in this dialogue on these podcasts, whatever the case may be, and it’s including those thoughts. And it’s including that those, like I said, those individuals, but what I love even further, as far as that action is concerned, is the belonging piece. So everyone’s talking about DNI or D AI, but I’m all about D IB. Because if I am in that room, you’ve invited me to sit at that table, that’s great. And I’m able to share my thoughts. But when I feel heard, when I can run with that idea, when I feel like you know, this particular thing couldn’t have happened without me, then I feel like I belong. And that leads to retention within corporations as well.

The Collaborator
I love that letter. And it really inspires me, the way you phrased all that. So thank you for sharing, because I know, I’ve chatted with the four founding females of wise. And I call them the Fantastic Four because Love it, love their story. And but one of the same sort of pieces, or similar pieces to what you just said, in terms of really feeling like it’s okay to contribute feel like, I matter. I’m not just sitting here is loud, and free to provide my input and that it’s going to be taken the way it should be. Not just I love that. Now, we can talk about this topic for years, but we won’t.

Blaire Hervey
Okay,

Unknown Speaker
not today. Not today,

The Collaborator
I’m gonna get you to come back. And we’ll talk about that again. Okay, but to talk about was sort of the power of diversity in the business. And I wanted to get your thoughts on it. And I may be I know, I have a very limited view of the world, just each of us to have our own perspectives. But I look at this as both a challenge in terms of how do we hire, and how do we grow these pathways in businesses. So maybe maybe let’s start with the hiring front. How Do we do a better job of hiring a broader set of viewpoints and and I want to sort of take the people out of it for a second, which is probably wrong. But, you know, just broader view of perspectives, broad set of perspectives.

Blaire Hervey
I mean, there are just so many different ways I mean, something that we pride ourselves on AWS at Amazon Web Services, is working customer back. Like, if you think about who is purchasing your product? Who is purchasing your services? Who’s showing up at whatever event it is that you’re creating? What is it that what do they look like? And again, physically, yes, literally, right and figuratively, but what do they look like? And what do they need. And when you start considering those things, you realize you can’t take a limited view and be able to serve all of these customers and all of these clients, it’s going to require different people. And so when you start working backwards from the mindset, then and then of course, attach the bodies to that you realize that the people that think like that are going to look different as well. And that which is a blessing that that is what you want. But something that I discovered at one of the organizations that I had the pleasure of working for is, I started with a team that was predominantly white male, it was actually predominantly white. And then after some time, it was predominantly white male, and we all looked around and said, Hey, something needs to change, right? Just because of the limited perspective and the backgrounds, we need to be able to serve our customers in a different way. So we were able to increase diversity on that team by 38%. In 90 days, we started to welcome a man of color, a couple of women of color, more women than we ever had before, they were learning how to use our solution, twice as fast as what our previous folks had been able to learn the solution. In turn, they were able to teach our customers how to use our solution twice as fast. So what did that do that increased customer adoption, that increased customer satisfaction. So that in turn says again, working customer back, being able to diversify your team serves the company as well, and it leads to much more revenue. So it just makes sense. I

The Collaborator
love that though, looking at your customers, trying to sanative of who you’re selling to, and maybe even who you’re trying to sell into to make sure you better reflect those demographics, or urges people and ways of thinking and all of that. That’s that’s a wonderful tip. But let me ask you this Blair, How the hell

Unknown Speaker
did you do that? So

The Collaborator
fast, change the makeup of your entire team in 90 days. And I know, it wasn’t just Blair, the Blair show?

Unknown Speaker
Correct?

The Collaborator
I’m asking you, you know, broadly, how did you How were you able to solve that or change that?

Blaire Hervey
Yeah, you know, it took a couple of things. I mean, it definitely took some courageous conversations. And it took an experience. So I actually had to travel outside of my comfort zone or my space. So remember, I moved from Atlanta, which again, it’s in pockets of the city, and a large population of the city is predominantly black, or, you know, at least diverse, right? So I took those experiences that culture that yearning that, that wanting in that culture shock, and said, I’m looking around and Vancouver, Washington, which is right across the bridge from Portland, Oregon, and thinking, Okay, I knew I wasn’t going to experience a lot of diversity here. Where can we get this talent? So I went to Afro tech in San Francisco. It at the time, it was a smaller conference, focused on the needs of black leaders, black web developers, and black folks in tech. Right. So we have to stop saying that the pipeline is dry. We can’t be like, you know, the that leader at Wells Fargo would say, you know that the talent is just limited. That’s not true. The truth is, we’re not trying hard enough. We’re not looking in different places. So when I came back from Afro tech, and I realized the pipeline was not dry, obviously, I started working with HR. And I started asking those questions that were uncomfortable, which is, you know, what does the diversity on our team look like now? What is what are the projections? How can we do this together? Why aren’t there more black folks around this table or more women around this table, and I was definitely confronted with some less than pleasant responses, and wasn’t always a welcoming experience. But I pushed through it. And HR heard me loud and clear. And my business partner, we were able to change the DOP job descriptions to make them much more inclusive. And we created a balanced panel, so that it wasn’t all just men. It wasn’t just white men, but it was a variety. It wasn’t all the same role. There was a bright of people sitting across from the folks being interviewed. So those were a couple of things that we did.

The Collaborator
Those are some amazing tips. I’m going to go slightly off track and ask you this I can I get a sense flare, that you’re a take no prisoners, I see a problem. I’m going to help go solve it, which is wonderful, but even even people like you and I’ll say give myself 30% of you and me. We still feel emotions when people are pushing back and being like, Oh, I just want to scream or, or I just want to cry and give up or whatever the emotions are, how did you bear? or How did you

Unknown Speaker
turn them? Right

The Collaborator
find the right word. But how do you find the fortitude to say is I’m just going to push through? Because I believe in it?

Blaire Hervey
Yeah, um,

Unknown Speaker
you know,

Blaire Hervey
I think having a lot of conversations with people in that organization that I worked for at the time. And just asking them if they were experiencing something similar, was, was helpful. And not in the sense of, you know, hey, you’re another black person? Are you experiencing discrimination? That’s not the case. But no, talk to me about your experiences of feeling excluded, because that’s a universal feeling. That’s a universal emotion. You know, as a white male, I’m sure there have been, you know, times where it’s just like, I don’t feel like I belong in that space.

The Collaborator
Everybody feels excluded sometimes.

Blaire Hervey
Everyone. Absolutely. So hearing that from someone else, and being able to share those stories, creating safe spaces, it was therapeutic, it created the space of collective healing. And then that actually recharged me and filled me with a lot more strength to keep moving.

The Collaborator
I love that. I love that. Let me ask you this. So So you’ve cracked the hiring code, you figured out where to find people?

Unknown Speaker
After

The Collaborator
going the one, let me ask you about that Afro tech. There are conferences. And I don’t know this. So I’m asking because I really want to learn. Are there offices where you can go? I’m trying to find a way to ask this that doesn’t sound horribly insensitive, but fine diversities talented groups of different diversities,

Unknown Speaker
yes. Say, Hey, I

The Collaborator
want to I want to make my team more broad. Are there types of conferences like that?

Blaire Hervey
Absolutely. No, that’s a great question. And these are questions that should be asked. And this is the questions that folks should be asking when it’s time when it comes time to hire, so they can go recruit in those places. But yes, Afro tech is definitely won the National Black association of members of the NBA or you know, folks that have gotten their MBA, but there’s a National Black Association for that it’s in, I have to look it up flat of letters. But that’s definitely one. There’s lots of conferences, blacks and tech, for those individuals, especially because everything is virtual. Now, there’s no excuse. But there should be leaders.

The Collaborator
There’s no excuse to pull not to be able to pull together and create these kinds of opportunities. And that’s really a great point.

Blaire Hervey
Oh, yeah, there’s several events.

The Collaborator
Thank you. Because when you said Afro tech, I said, geez, I don’t know what that one is. And I’m sure this All right, thank you. Oh, problem.

The Collaborator
Let me ask you this. We talked a little bit about hiring, how do you take our partner over the talent in your organization already? To help provide them with career paths? Because what I you know, I’ve been around for 100 years. And and what I often see is, unfortunately, sometimes people get into roles in one place. And they don’t even know that there’s opportunities to move their career if they want to, in a different direction. So I guess, how do we make it easier for people to learn about and explore opportunities, where they may not be exploring or thinking about today? And is that a good idea feels like it is to me, but what are your thoughts?

Blaire Hervey
Yeah, I would definitely agree with you. It is definitely a good idea. I find that employee resource groups are fantastic. So I knew for a long time, again, like I was telling you before, I’m a mom of a 17 year old. So I was a teen mom. And I oftentimes in the sales spaces in predominantly white male spaces. And in tech, I’m looking for a mentor who looks like me and who has my experiences. And that just wasn’t happening as I write. But as I turned to these employee resource groups, or affinity groups, where there’s other you know, black folks or other women who had share similar experiences, I’m also learning about the roles that they are partaking in. So I, it gives me an opportunity to explore roles. Those employee resource groups also can set up like career fairs, invite other leaders into different dialogues. So you are inadvertently learning about other roles and other career paths. And you have an opportunity to gain a mentor and it doesn’t have to be your supervisor. So those are a couple of things that I would recommend, if there aren’t employee resource groups within your organization to explore other career paths, much like you said, not only like conferences, but their slack channels. There are different Yeah, I’m in a group called pd x woman of color. So there are all kinds of groups. There’s black Portland, in the Portland area, and you can join reach out to people and say, Hey, I’m looking to you know, explore different careers. You know, what openings Do you all have at your organizations, and that work that’s important.

The Collaborator
I love that. Ah, I love this. This is really cool. And nowadays I understand why you look so young, because how can you have a 17 year old?

Unknown Speaker
and Diane, just young,

Unknown Speaker
but you’re like, make me ask you this.

The Collaborator
I mean, in terms of so we talked about hiring a little bit career pathing? Are there other opportunities or other things businesses should be considering in terms of helping make their teams more diverse or inclusive, you know, as well?

Blaire Hervey
Absolutely. So I would say focus on three to five main areas. And that would include, I mean, I’m good for a good alliteration. So the three R’s are the first three, right? Again, I’ve been learning development for a long time. But there is definitely recruitment. So when we’re talking about recruitment, some of the things that we’ve mentioned already reach out to these groups that are affinity groups or diverse groups, and I looked it up, it’s actually the in B MBA. So that’s the National Black MBA Association.

The Collaborator
Oh, my God, that’s too many letters. For me,

Blaire Hervey
it is it’s a lot of letters. But it’s an easy Google, it’s an exact, so recruiting, especially if credentials are something are important to organizations. On the flip side, I didn’t complete my bachelor’s degree, I was actually recruited to join the MBA program for Willamette University. So we have to stop looking for just credentials, we have to stop looking for folks that just attended certain schools, and start thinking about grit, start thinking about transferable skills and start thinking about that non conventional or unconventional education that could still contribute to a good employee or a good person that can join the team.

The Collaborator
There, yeah, go ahead through that is so very true. There are so many careers that, who cares if you have your undergraduate, you know, college degree, right? If there are skills that are missing, you can also learn them on the job, or we need to invest more into our people, if there’s some critical skills that you can send back to school for. I don’t care if we’re talking about diverse or non diverse candidates, be open minded about that people, it’s so important. So but I’m sorry, that that’s such

Blaire Hervey
a no, you’re absolutely right. I mean, even if one of my last organizations, they paid for me to get just a strategic organizational management certification, right, and that’s something that I can apply right away. So start thinking outside of the box, when it comes to recruiting, I would also say retainment. So that goes back to the belonging piece. So we’re always talking about like, you know, how many black folks or how many people of color how many women do we have in the conference room? In the C suite at these tables in leadership? Well, how many people do you have in your organization already, that you can start preparing? So much, like you said, john, start thinking about these career paths, start talking about career exploration, but also start talking about succession planning. Because oftentimes, people are tapping the next person on the shoulder that looks like them that you know, someone that they can relate to. There’s a lot of nepotism oftentimes, in startups, and you know, these organizations that are started by friends and family are true, what? Who else can you look to write? So that’s the retainment piece, and helping folks feel like they belong? And then of course, then there is readiness, which is what we were talking about as well. How can we focus on leadership advancement? How can we focus on coaching? How can we focus on the things that are important to the people that are sitting in the seats every single day to get them prepared for that next level? So those are the three areas now if they’re feeling lofty, and they’ve already focused on those three, which everyone has worked to do? The other two, I would say is diversity, education and community outreach. With all five of those things, that helps an organization become much more well rounded. With the community outreach. They’re building this social currency, so that folks in the community colleges are

The Collaborator
what what does that look like?

Blaire Hervey
Yeah, it could be multiple colleges, it could be vendors, it could be anything from Who do you all use for lunch? Are you all starting to reach out to the smaller businesses that are minority owned, and now the community knows that you’re everything that you’re always talking about? So when you put up that Black Lives Matter post, people can actually vouch for you because they know that from the lunch on, you know, at a luncheon, learn to the vendors that you use the outside speakers, you will care about bringing in diverse talent.

The Collaborator
I love that. And then that goes back to me actions, not just words, action.

Blaire Hervey
Absolutely. Absolutely.

The Collaborator
I love that. Let me let me I’m gonna put you on the spot for a second. We jumped out why maintain that diverse teams may be better performing or higher performing than non diverse teams.

Blaire Hervey
You know, and I would usually say, Well, you know, touch on It’s for my lived experience, right? I’m a diverse candidate. I’m a diverse talent. But I will tell you again leading a team full of talent, right, but leading a team on both sides of the fence that we’re, you know, all black, or all black male, or all white male. We’re all women, you know, there’s power in all of those areas, but there’s strength in diverse candidates, see, because then you have an opportunity to introduce a new way of thought. And you include bar razors. So again, that’s something that we love at AWS as well. But when you bring in someone from a different perspective, different walks of life, different organization, instantly, the people on the team perk up, right, because it’s someone different. It’s like, oh, shoot, what are they going to say? What are they bringing to the table? It’s competition. Yeah, you’re bringing, you’re instantly bringing in a bar raiser, which is great for the team as well. And that’s how the team can continue to grow.

The Collaborator
I like it, I like it. And look naturally. And intuitively, it just makes good sense. When you get an variety of ideas, whether you’re talking about a creative job, or less creative job, you create a diversity of ideas and thoughts. They do. Yeah, new approaches. It’s just, it’s just makes sense. So just

Blaire Hervey
anjani Right, exactly. And it I think, folks, just think about, you know, gender and ethnicity, particularly in this time, but even you know, bringing in left handed folks who can have conversations with product have

The Collaborator
stopped there, no left handed people

Unknown Speaker
draw the line,

Blaire Hervey
we need a we need the lefties, we need a different folks need the folks who are colorblind, right, because I love all my colors. Like I always have this going on. And I always forget, maybe I should wear a plain top. Or even with hashtags when it comes to marketing. When you capitalize the first letter of the word, it’s, it’s great for those who read differently, or who again, just process information differently. So we need everyone, those are

The Collaborator
really smart points that I just want to note, you know, the colorblind, you know, one, which is one, you know, I don’t think of normally but I remember I worked for a boss at one this this guy at one point, he was colorblind. And he really forced us to change the way we went about presenting, because he needed it presented differently. But in doing so we actually came up with a better solution to this problem. So just something like that, that isn’t outwardly visible. Mm hmm. But it is a diverse perspective that we all need to take into account. I love that. I love that. All right, good. Thank you. I’m gonna, I’m gonna embarrass you a little bit. I’m gonna say, there, you are clearly a troublemaker, because you went out of your way. And Amazon created this poble inclusion and diversity initiative. Nobody asked you to.

Blaire Hervey
This is true. But this was not an Amazon. This was

The Collaborator
a zoom, I met a zoom. I said, Oh, you I’m so awesome. I’m glad. I think that’s amazing. Thank you How on earth? Well, let me ask you a couple of things. Because I’d love people to learn from what you did, and try to take for this kind of idea for themselves. Why did you do it? How did you go about it? And, you know, anything else you want to share?

Blaire Hervey
Yeah, you know, and I love that she said troublemaker, right, just like the the late, great representative john C. Lewis, you know, go out there and seek and make some good trouble. I just know, I knew how I felt at the moment. And I knew that again, I knew I was moving to an organization or excuse me a company, excuse me, a city that wasn’t very diverse. So I knew what to expect there. But when I felt it, I knew I had to do something about it. But I also knew that it wasn’t just about me. And so like I was saying before, you know, reaching out to other people, sharing those stories, at gave us an opportunity to create five employee resource groups. So that also gave two to three liters per employee resource group and opportunity to gain a new skill set. We had to they got to lead a project. They got to take their convictions and everything that they cared about, and make a change and a huge impact in a company. So no one had to ask me to do it. Well, once we’ve got that thing started, it was it took off on its own. And now this organization is doing so many different things as it applies to diversity. They’re connecting with HBCUs, one of the leaders of zoom in color. I mean, he’s spoken on different platforms. So shout out to Caleb cam Johnson. And I just love that they continued with that legacy. And that’s why it’s important. It doesn’t just have to start with you. If it starts with you should end with you. So yeah, go out there. Make sense? Trouble, solve some problems. But also make sure that you’re talking to the folks around you to make sure that you are serving not only your customers, but your your actual employees as well. I love that

The Collaborator
we’re going to be asking this for those resource groups. What can give us a couple of examples? Like, what are these groups? Like, what do they What do they focus on? And I know, I’m sure but what kinds of things did they focus on?

Blaire Hervey
Yeah, at the time, the focus was empowerment and advancement of that particular group itself. So the five employee resource groups that we started were for black employees, women, for veterans, for those remote employees, and for lbgtq plus employees as well. So we wanted to place an emphasis on those, those groups. So if people felt safe, you could come there and talk about, you know, you know, the killing of George Floyd without feeling awkward, or weird. You can go in there and have these conversations about Coming Out Day without it being an issue. But you can also take that moment and share it with an organization and in an impactful way, you could have conversations about you know, being a veteran, and, you know, if you wanted to talk about politics, or your support or disdain for, you know, Trump or the president or, you know, Kamala Harris, whatever your your thoughts and concerns were, you had a safe space for that. But you also could create solutions to solve problems within an organization. And I think that’s where everyone really, truly made an impact, and loved what they did.

The Collaborator
That that that is so powerful. Let me let me ask you this, if it takes one minute, okay. You’re listening. And I’m saying to myself, geez, I want to do that in my business. I know, you went out there, you start to have conversations with people really? Was was the resource team run by a senior leader? Or was it just someone from the from the company that said, geez, I want to help support and drive this forward? How did you how did you create that in the short momentum there?

Blaire Hervey
Yeah. So we took a ground swell approach. So again, we got all of the employees, we’ve created leaders within the employee base, and created something to present to leadership. And that allowed us to get executive sponsorship, pretty early on that allowed us to gain a budget, because we were able to get their buy in based on data. So one of the things that you’ll see me talk about or hear, hear about me is, you know, I create, and I love building meaningful relationships between people and data. So yes, we’re going to share these stories and have these conversations. But how does this make an impact when the employees that are here, particularly in those three areas in recruitment, and retainment, and readiness, and then we could present that to leadership, our CEO loved it. And he actually encouraged that people participate in diversity day, and other activities as well. And he still encourages that to this day, even though I’m not there. So I love that we were able to create that.

The Collaborator
I love that. I love that I want people to follow you ask you all kinds of questions and replicate this model all over the place. Let me ask you this. What happened? We’ve talked about and I know we could talk about any of these topics for hours, but is there any key points that you are john, I want to make sure I shared this?

Blaire Hervey
Yeah, I will definitely sit definitely say to leaders, and I think we have belabor the point. But we can’t say it enough. Yes, that’s talking about it, really be about it. And that means if you are going to, you know, talk about recruitment, don’t just talk about recruiting and going to these places, talk to your employees about having a diverse network of their own. Most organizations rely on their employees for referrals. So if in and they often say that, you know, doing anything else slows down the hiring process? Well, you have to train your employees on how to create these diverse networks of their own. So when you need a referral, they’re reaching out to diverse people. So diversity, equity, inclusion, belonging, all of these things starts at home. Let’s stop, you know, projecting and you know, performing rather, and really do the work within ourselves. That’s what I would say john

The Collaborator
Blair. in all sincerity, you have inspired me, you are a good are all the way. I can tell that.

Blaire Hervey
I’ll take that. Thank you.

The Collaborator
I would love to be called a good troublemaker. But I don’t know if that’s as true as it is with you. Because amazing things already. So thank you. And thank you for sharing these because I just want to encourage people in all sincerity to take a listen to what Blair has shared here. There’s some great tips for starting out. And for really, let’s it’s important, we move beyond words, we need to take real action and the one thing I’ll share my final thought here blue and I’ll let you read react before we close out is by looking to be diverse and inclusive. We’re not making this a us versus them kind of conversation. It’s not a GS, we’re taking away opportunities from one to create another, we’re simply trying to ensure that the the best people for any opportunity or have access to it, that would make sure that everybody has the same opportunities and the same rights. And I know I’m oversimplifying that, but I want people to really recognize we need to move beyond some level of silliness that I see out there, unfortunately, of, you know, trying to make it us versus them. It’s not a sort of one human race, let’s just do right by each other.

Blaire Hervey
Absolutely, I would totally agree with you. And, you know, oftentimes, again, these are conversations that companies should be having with their employees before they start inviting new employees in. It’s much like I’m not I don’t have a green thumb. But from what I understand before you can plant something, you have to, you know, make that short, make sure that soil is fertile and make sure that it’s ready for something to be planted. And if you don’t do that, then that plant will die. It can’t grow to its full potential,

The Collaborator
the best plan possible. Absolutely. Potential, absolutely. crappy soil,

Blaire Hervey
often, and the other thing that we forget to when it comes to that is, you know, once everything starts growing, we can’t overwater a certain area, there are just certain areas and certain plants that need water. That doesn’t mean that the entire garden doesn’t matter. It just means that there’s some plants that need more water or more nourishment.

The Collaborator
So as somebody who spent his summer spending a lot of time in my garden, I appreciate that metaphor. That was awesome. Good. Excellent. I’m gonna let you go. And I’m gonna say wait a second. I have one one comment here I just wanna Ah, Jennifer may har. Bontrager from DFC I’m just wait in that we need more troublemakers like bliss. So I

Blaire Hervey
thank you, Jennifer.

The Collaborator
Remember, Jennifer, if you ask for it, you’ll get it. So truffle isn’t always comfortable.

Unknown Speaker
But maybe sure, but we needed

Blaire Hervey
to reach out to me. Yes,

The Collaborator
I will. Die a blur. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. thank everybody for listening and take action.

Unknown Speaker
All right.