Data driven enablement – an effective sales productivity approach

Philip Aaronson and Gregory Moore stopped in to share their work on data driven enablement to increase sales productivity at ServiceNow.  Their work has been recognized by Brandon Hall where they won the Silver Medal in 2020 for Best Advance in Machine Learning and AI.

The good news is this work can be replicated, on a smaller scale, without investing thousand or millions in technology.  How do you help your sales teams and individual sales reps make smarter decisions?

1️⃣ Begin by collecting the data you have on your sellers, the deals they are closing, etc…

2️⃣Analyze what the best sellers are doing.  Understand what your most-likely to win deals have in common.  Analyze conversations and sales metrics.

3️⃣Use the hypothesis to being to identify what your sellers should do for certain types of deals — validate that your hypothesis still holds up, adjusting as necessary.

It is harder to build a data driven sales enablement approach a small budget but still doable.  Start small, achieve a few wins, and keep going.  Remember, sales executives, making decisions based on data, will make better decisions than those making decisions based upon gut feel alone.

Audio Transcript

The Collaborator
Hey, everybody is John Moore, the collaborator second time today, going for a third in a couple of hours. But I’m super excited to be here with Greg and Phil from ServiceNow. I’m gonna let you both Introduce yourself because you’re going to do a much better job than I ever will. So why don’t you guys go ahead for a couple of seconds?

Gregory Moore
Yeah, sure. I’ll go first. Greg Moore coming to you live from Tampa, Florida. Notwithstanding the sweater. It’s a little chilly here today in Tampa, Florida. 20 years as a sales leader, passion for the science of selling and how data impacts the way we think about the right sales plays. And so now just six months with ServiceNow leading the sales performance team sales productivity team, excuse me, and and having a good time.

The Collaborator
That’s awesome. And the sweaters fantastic. Although as a man living in Florida, I’m a little embarrassed for you. I should be wearing up in the northeast. What about you, Phil?

Phil Aaronson
Whereas Hi, everyone, my name is Phil aaronson sales productive sales productivity director here at ServiceNow. Spent 10 years in sales and sales leadership the last 15 years in sales enablement, focused on sales methodologies, data driven enablement. We’re really excited about the work that we’re doing here. I am coming to you live from Northern California, where it is also a little chilly today. But I didn’t break out the sweaters yet being I’m originally from New York. So I’m trying to work up to that.

The Collaborator
All right, I like it, I like it. And my hope is that we get to the pull a couple of those guitars off the wall and start playing a few licks while we get into it. So we’ll see what happens here, Phil, you know, I was super excited when we first chatted because a I didn’t know that Brandon Hall did such a thing as gave out awards for really cool, technical, not just technology, but cool innovations in sales. And I know you won what the silver medal around advances in machine learning and AI, really cool stuff as applied to sales, data driven analytics. Tell me a little bit how have those efforts impacted your business? You know, when rates do velocity AV ACB? any of that kind of stuff? What’s been the result of this cool project?

Gregory Moore
Tell me I just described the Brandon Hall part of it for and then you could answer. Yep. So john, the Brandon Hall is an association Industry Association recognizes learning and development, largely leadership sales, some of the core areas that an organization will be trying to improve results. And we submitted for this advanced in machine learning and AI, because we’re using data analytics, and particularly machine learning to try to study our top performers and understand what they do different, what they do better than all others. And then because Phil and I are in productivity, we are part of the enablement world. I mean, see this through the lens of not just data analytics and sales ops for the sake of data, but to drive greater performance. So what can we do with that data to enable Salesforce to perform? It’s a fairly innovative approach, I think a lot. Not too many organizations are taking this approach. We get the feedback very regularly from the field, that wow, this is very innovative. We like it. So it’s, it’s, we’re, we’re building the track a little bit as we go. But it’s, it’s so far, it’s got the all the signs of of the program that’s going to have tremendous impact. And we’re excited about the award.

The Collaborator
That’s awesome, Greg, you know, the best adventures in the world take place when you’re building the car as you’re driving down the road. So it sounds like that’s exactly what the road you guys are on right now. You know, Phil, tell us a little bit about the impact, though, you know, in terms of the numbers, what have you seen so far?

Phil Aaronson
Yeah, absolutely. And I love that analogy. Sometimes you have to machine custom parts for the car, because they just don’t exist in the organization. So a lot of this started from my own work in sales and enablement. And it was about, you know, measuring impacts, right, and understanding how we can drive towards certain outcomes. Because a lot of times we measure ourselves by what happens at the end of a quarter, but we don’t necessarily know how we’ve gotten there. And working with a third party sales analytics firm employee, you know, one of the things that was really important, a lesson that I took to heart is that what happens at the end of a quarter is descriptive, right? That’s what happened. We don’t know why it happened. You want to focus on the diagnostic and understand correlation and causation. So we’ve been on this journey. A lot of this is new this year. We did a lot of planning for this in the previous year. And Greg coming on board has been a tremendous, tremendous asset to ServiceNow certainly helped to clarify a lot of our thoughts, but at the end of the day, we’re tracking this both in reports and data dashboard format in terms of its impact, I’ll just tell you from a predictive standpoint, because we’re still in the process of measuring our results over the year, predictive analytics that we have, if you take a look at the managers who have done the best job in terms of attaching, you know, what we call value prompters the story of our deal to a particular opportunity, and how we’re measuring the quality using predictive analytics, if you’re in the top half of our stack rank, your deals close at a ratio of greater than one out of two, okay, it’s at 51%, we’re in the bottom half, your average is going to be 34%, which doesn’t even speak to if managers are using it correctly. It just says we have used predictive analytics to actually match the results of the organization. And that’s gotten a lot of people’s attention. I hope to have a much better report on all of this the next time we get a chance to talk. But quality is on everybody’s mind in terms of how are we running through our sales cycle? And where are where’s the deal risk for all of our account reps?

The Collaborator
We know we all we’re all always struggling to figure out where do we invest our time that we don’t have enough of and all that. So it sounds like you’re making some initially at least it appears that initial results are really positive for it. So that’s, that’s amazing. One of the things that I thought was really interesting. And I think Greg seems to bring this more of a research, focus on things. And and I mean, that is a positive thing. You know, so many researchers don’t know what they’re doing, Phil, I mean, let’s be honest. But Greg seems like he does, which is, which is really cool. I mean, how did you guys plan this out? I mean, it seems like you started off in a very rigorous way. You put together your your hypothesis, and you started to map it all out? What did that part of the process look like?

Gregory Moore
Well, I’ll, I’ll comment, just my my hardwiring has always been around, study top performers understand what they do different or better than all others, and then see what you can do to develop the rest of the group to perform closer more like the top performers. And that has mostly upside has a few downsides we can talk about in a few moments, but that, but on the upside starts side of it means that you have to be able to study behaviors. And if you can’t study behaviors, by observation, like a sales manager could out in a call observing real time or a zoom call, perhaps if we do now, then you have to start to think about how to study in a in an offline systematic kind of way to connecting the systems. Looking at how this data compares to this data, look at what kinds of things shifted, we love some of the tools, the technology tools that are out there now, that can record some of the dialogue so that that can be analyzed and so forth. So that from a research perspective, getting that set up correctly, so we have the ability to connect to systems and steady behaviors, you know, virtually is part of the getting it right

The Collaborator
now, and that makes sense. Did you um, well, let me ask you this. It sounds like when you were starting to bring this forth internally, it probably was a pretty wild set of ideas. You know, transformational people, were probably sitting there going, Wow, this sounds cool. But we’re not seeing anybody else do it. So why should we? How can you partner inside the organization to get people to say, let’s do it? Because that’s the hardest part sometimes, or the enablement of saying, Hey, we got a new idea. Let’s do it.

Phil Aaronson
Greg, if I may, on this one. You’re right. You know, if we had attempted to show the forest for the trees and really boil the ocean, we probably would have lost our very type a sales audience, right? So come in with insights that they can use turn this data into information that makes sense to them. So I’ll share the story of how I kicked this off in the Americas. And I’ll just keep it brief. I was asked by I introduced these ideas to the Chief of Staff for the Americas. I was intrigued, you know, and he had I love working with john Corelli. And he was, you know, very thorough in terms of Okay, well, how would this make sense? And how can we do this? So then he invited me to speak at the Americas leadership QPR and to present some of these ideas, and honestly, I was looking for a pirate, I wanted just an opportunity to say, Okay, let’s take the select group, and then we can measure the delta over time. So what I did was just trying to cut down to 20 slides I had into just about eight to 10 that talked about the main idea and that we weren’t pulling these insights out of thin air. Here’s the analysis. Here’s what it told us. Here’s what we recommend to do. I should add that I got a nervous note from john right before I went and he said, you know, the other day The guy is talking for 30 minutes and nobody can follow him. So please try and make this digestible and you have less than I promise you. No pressure, right?

Unknown Speaker
No pressure.

The Collaborator
But good luck. Right?

Phil Aaronson
So we get through it. I ask any at the end, are there any questions and there was a smattering. But I said, you know, either everybody said, this is awesome, or it didn’t land at all. And I’m just going to be sent back to the laboratory to go figure this out. I got a call for john, right after the meeting and said, yeah, we want to run this. And I was like, great, what region? He said, No, we want to run this for all Americans, how quickly can you do this. So you know, being able to just simply synthesize something down that says, we’re going to help you with your win rates for this quarter was the message three, one, like that was the takeaway that everybody took, and that’s a good place to start, you build your momentum. You know, we’re at a point now, where we’ve got 10 different groups focused on this for flying the flag. We’re trying to get to that tipping point, as you’re right, you know, in an organization, it can be presented as somewhat of a radical idea, right?

The Collaborator
Well, and I’m thinking, you know, in a small organization, let’s say a small startup, people are often you know, willing to go ask for it, let’s try it. It’s a new idea. Who cares, we’re small, we’re young. But in a more mature organization, where you guys are gonna, you know, really mature, the highly successful organization, sometimes there’s a concern about not trying new ideas. So I either want to understand, what did you put on those slides? Or did you play a jam, you know, while you know, you know, saying, you know, singing it out, cuz that’s pretty impressive to get not only a bypass on the pilot, but just go for it. Make. Were there any magic tips you can share with us, though, in terms of how you did that presentation, it wasn’t just hammering that point about, hey, we’re going to increase win rates.

Phil Aaronson
You know, this is where I have to give credit to both Greg and Giles getting’s as well as a couple of other advisors. The way I think about things, I feel like I have to explain everything. It’s my enablement and teaching background. I wanted to make sure to not bury the headlines. And, you know, people are telling us like, Look, as long as people understand that this is going to increase win ratios, and that you’re going to make their lives easier when they look at opportunities to understand where they’re at, and the Delta where they want to get to, that’s going to really be key, but you’re giving me some other ideas. I mean, I might do my next presentation with an acoustic guitar and, you know, come up with some kind of very memorable chorus. So maybe that will help me to

The Collaborator
find a little bit Sweet Caroline and change the verses something like sweet winning numbers. I mean, you know, you’re better than I come up with something like that, and have Greg behind me and just sort of dance and it’ll be awesome.

Gregory Moore
It’s sweet across the line, you know, because we’re focused on coding.

The Collaborator
Right, just nailed it out of the park. That’s your next presentation idea, Phil. No charge.

Gregory Moore
It’s automated. And you build on what Phil was saying, I also want to give kudos to Giles Giles had this bidding vision before I came on board, that Yeah, data driven approach was the one that we needed to take to create a learning organization. And some of his inspiration also came from looking at other organizations that had achieved some level of that one of those being SAP. And the fact that we are our CEO, is from SAP also, I think, give us give us some some tailwinds to make this happen. And I think you’d find in anywhere that Bill McDermott is present in an organization, there is a drive for innovation and okayness to take risks, and prove something out that that’s really healthy. You don’t see in big companies often than we have here. So it’s nice.

The Collaborator
No, that’s that’s huge. And kudos to the entire team up and down for for that willingness and an understanding of how important that is, you know, talk to me a little bit about where do you see the biggest areas of improvement right now? I know you are, you’re really just getting started. You’re getting some early initial results and look really promising. But what do you think there’s big room for improvement or opportunities for improvement in terms of what you’re doing? Right? The second,

Gregory Moore
the metrics we’re trying to move, because again, we’re sales productivity. So the key metrics that we’re focused on, are getting more of our keys to quota attainment, that’s a big one, we build our business plans around the revenue that would be attached to that. So making sure a real healthy percentage of our employees are making their annual quota is the big goal. But to do that, well, there are a couple of sub drivers of success that matter that we have to measure, we have to influence their leading indicators of that big goal. So that would be things like your average deal size, it would be things like your win loss ratio, would be things like the number of opportunities and how you work with partners. Those things feed into, you know, quota, Tim, and not so coincidentally, they are all part of the same mathematical formula. That was revenue attainment.

Phil Aaronson
Just to piggyback on that, some of the areas that we see is, you know, just better collaboration and better ways to disseminate information. You know, when you’re, when you’re starting a program like this, we can provide, we can provide insight reports, you know, we can work with individual VPS, and take a look at performance. But we just had some massive changes in ServiceNow. You know, it’s public information that we went with Microsoft, as a as our CRM provider, after going off of our homegrown system back when ServiceNow wasn’t sure who they wanted to be when they grew up, right? We’re like, we can play in that space. We’re a platform company, right? But we realized that there are just you know, some very, there’s a lot of value out of our relationship with Microsoft. So right now, we want to update our dashboards, what are what are managers managing to and so we’re taking a look at KPIs, we’re taking a look at watermarks, we’re taking a look at all the predictive analytics that we’re providing here as well, we want to make it easier to just if you’re a manager to just you know, glide over an opportunity and see some of the performance metrics around that some of the things that need to happen. So it’s about you know, pulling in our IT systems, getting that to work, pulling in our bi team to really be a part of the solution. You know, in any effort like this, when you bring in a third party organization, it can be seen as well, you know, why can’t we just use this team, and it adds, we really want to bring in the best practices from that organization to influence what we do internally. So for me, you know, the next phase of this is about collaboration, orchestration and better dissemination. And I didn’t plan on all of those kind of rhyming but there you go. Maybe I thought

The Collaborator
that was a nice touch though. I thought that was a nice touch. It felt like

Gregory Moore
exact on there somewhere. There’s the there’s a lyric series right in there.

The Collaborator
So this thing is ServiceNow doesn’t work out for you. I pay to see in concert, I think you’ve got some skills going.

Phil Aaronson
You know, as long as I’m comfortable in a you know, converter van driving around Modesto at my bar gigs, you know, but somehow mortgages get in the way of that. It’s it’s an issue.

The Collaborator
Yeah, damn those mortgages and responsibilities. You know,

Gregory Moore
I have a request, Phil, please don’t quit your day job. That’s what I need. We need you

Phil Aaronson
in a positive affirmation.

The Collaborator
Thank you, coming from a place of love. Hey, y’all, I know it’s early. But how do you expect this to impact your sellers individually? I mean, one of the big challenges in sales is always turnover. How long? are they staying? You know, all of that kind of stuff? Do you see an impact to the person to the human side of sellers? And how that impacts their careers as a result of this?

Unknown Speaker
Yeah, I’m sorry. No, no, go

Phil Aaronson
for it. Go for it. I have a couple of ideas. But Greg, please,

Gregory Moore
john, this is really what brought me to the world of sales, performance improvement, and is what has kept me here for two decades, is this idea that we can do something to impact an individual sellers performance, and that has a profound impact on their life, their family, their career, and as they grow up and become sales leaders themselves, that they might perpetuate some of those things that they learned early in their career and have a you know, it’s the it’s the pebble in the lake, and it just grows and grows. That is one of the my favorite things about this space is the impact of the opportunity to impact an individual sellers life. And, and all the things that go with that.

Phil Aaronson
That’s that’s huge, Greg, you know, in from my days in sales, I didn’t spend as long as as Greg, but there’s always that sense of, you know, am I being really supported by the organization? Or was I just given, you know, this is gonna be showing my age was I just given a phone and a Rolodex, right. And these days, the modern CRM equivalent of that, right. But, you know, we tend as an organization to measure ourselves against the top performers who are unconsciously competent, you know, they know when they need to organize, when they join an organization, they understand the product sets and all the problems that it uniquely solves for and be able to married up to in their mind so they can seamlessly pivot between business outcomes, and technical outcomes and the value that we provide. It’s really about the middle 60%, right? They’ve got all the all the stuff you want, right? They got the drive, the desire, the dedication, you know, as our product portfolio expands, we want to, we want to take some of their weight off of their shoulders and automate as much as possible. So when they’re talking to a customer, you know, can we talk predictably about the outcomes that we can drive from this product set? Can we show them some of the selling motions that will are our most successful for a particular use case, the more that we can support these folks One that’s going to have a tremendous impact on attrition you want to stay in a company that has a successful is a good banner. I mean, all of that is definitely, you know, part of the ServiceNow DNA. But the second piece is, do we make it easier for you to hit an exceed quota? Are we giving you opportunities for personal growth? are we providing career paths, and so much of what we’re doing right now, around analytics, and insight and preparation, is focused on the folks who need more of a prescriptive process to get from point A to point B. And so that’s how I see us, you know, really helping people. And what’s the saying, you take your position with the next one in mind. You know, for me, if somebody stayed here for four years, and was wildly successful, and moved on to a role of greater significance authority, that would be a win in my mind, because they’re more valuable when they left than when they came in here. And from a business perspective, from a humanistic perspective, that’s, that’s what I want for people. That’s what I’m all for folks.

The Collaborator
I love that. I love that a lot, because I think we don’t put enough energy and focus in on to the human side of the sellers as well. So it’s great to hear both of your responses on it. And I was thinking, you know, a cell phone and a Rolodex didn’t sound that old to me, personally. Didn’t seem bad. Exactly, exactly. It let me ask you this, you guys are building all kinds of cool stuff. You are. I mean, you’re part of a big organization. You’ve got big budgets, compared to some companies. I know. It never feels like enough. What lessons though? Can others listening in take to their organization? If they don’t, if they’re not working for a company like ServiceNow? What What could they take in terms of, hey, try these ideas? Think about things this way. What would you share with them?

Gregory Moore
Huh? Yeah, good question. So the, one of the key differences in this approach with this data driven enablement is that we are, of course, trying to use our own data to understand top performers. And you don’t necessarily need to have a big budget to do that you can, you can work with your internal IT team to do a little bit of an internal study. And you just have to have some ideas of how to correlate that data with success. So if, if people are doing a that leads to a better performance in B. So I think that’s one call out is that that can be done on a on a low or no budget type of thing. The other though, is that it’s very calibrated to a group, each region and role will have different metrics, as we study top performers, if you’re in this hit the commercial space, that’s different than the enterprise space. And it might be different from me or a PJ than it is in the Americas. So having that relevance for each of those different levels, becomes an important predictor of success. And they’re getting that can be done internally, you can make some decisions around what that group, what their strengths are, where some gaps are, and build enablement to help people with those gaps. So all of that can be done on a relatively small budget, I think you don’t have to

The Collaborator
know I agree with you completely, Greg. And I think that’s an important call out, you just need to understand the audience’s you’re trying to support whether that’s a single type of SDR or a single a, maybe if you’re in a very small company, all the way up to many more complex to the level of complexity that you guys have, and others have. So I think that’s really smart advice. Well, anything natural,

Phil Aaronson
I would add this as somebody who has spent time in small startups, medium sized companies, large companies like ServiceNow, the dynamics always different, always different. But the basic premise is the same, right? It all starts with an idea. And you’ve got to be able to provide the business case and the rationale for supporting this idea. And it really kind of depends on the company, you’ve got to feel that this is right in your gut, I mean, you can prove it, utilizing data, you know, obviously, like qualitative, quantitative, what has been everybody’s, you know, feedback on on specific items around sales performance and sales productivity, but you have to be the champion, you’ve got to feel this in your gut, and you have to be prepared to have that gut kicked. Okay? Because you know, there will be naysayers and people who don’t want to move and some of it is because of, you know, perceptions. Some of it is bias. Some of it is fear, right. Create the rational case, don’t try to boil the ocean hit singles. The more successful singles you hit, the more of an influence you will have in a sales organization. I’ve seen a lot of people try to stand up great ideas and get really discouraged or kind of hold on to them too tightly in the face of resistance. You know, it’s never going to be a straight path from point A to point B and it’s amazing. A lot of it really involved. And involves organizational will.

The Collaborator
And those are great tips regardless of the size of organization or to the fact that be willing to take those incremental steps, test verified, get the user feedback as well as the data feedback. And sometimes you’re just going to flat out be wrong to you what I heard you say, Phil, and I agree with that completely. Sometimes our guts tell us this is the path to follow. And guess what we were completely wrong. And that’s okay. So the singles and doubles and just keep going, great feedback. And hopefully, the data backs up your gut. And hopefully it does and look, but if it doesn’t be smart enough to your point, you said sometimes people hold on to the idea too long. understand where the idea is wrong, whether it’s completely adjusted slightly and adjust accordingly. So

Phil Aaronson
be aware of your own bias. Absolutely. Exactly.

The Collaborator
We all have them. We just don’t always see them as clearly as we see everybody else’s. Right. You know, great. Tell me, tell me a little bit you have. You have such great experience. Working in Miller Heiman. In the past. I know you’ve spent a lot of your time investing in understanding AI. How much of that has really shaped you for where you are today and this approach overall?

Gregory Moore
Yeah, so interesting question. I was on the executive team and Miller Heiman group. And we were trying to pivot a little bit more towards sales tech. And so some of the courses that I took, I think you’re referring to were more for the management style, you know, their executive courses, as opposed to the actual learn to code courses. Some of them, we actually had to do some coding. And that’s I’m not a data scientist, I’m a business leader in a sales leader, first and foremost, with a passion for the data science that drives performance. So those are part of my inspiration to get involved in those and understand a little bit more was, was preparing for where that business was going. And just trying to make sure I was had the right knowledge to steer my region and groups that was responsible for in the right direction. But part of it too, was just the realization that the data mattered. And you had to have some fluency with data analytics, you had to understand how data driven decisions are made, and what how to just get data and look at it and interpret it correctly. So So all of that drove me toward, you know, the mid career studies to sharpen the saw and learn exactly how data analytics works in today’s business world.

The Collaborator
Yeah, two things I want people to take away from that, though, lifelong learning. It’s so important, just keep on learning. And you know, I would say, Greg, if you hadn’t invested in those sorts of things, you probably wouldn’t be where you are today. Yeah. Yeah, just critical. And I’m sure, Phil, you have a similar kind of story. But and the other thing I want people to keep in mind is data. I mean, you’ve heard a lot about data in this conversation. So far, data doesn’t completely replace the human gut, or even human feedback along the way. But you are a fool if you do not pay close attention to it and learn how to manipulate it should say learn from it, and manipulate it to make better decisions. So anyway, I think those are really important points.

Gregory Moore
Yeah, we we like to think of it as data is the is the a and AI with AI being augmented intelligence. So it’s not necessarily the machine learning aspect of it. But how do I, as a human, take this data, understand it and apply it so that I have both human creativity and context as well as the data driven insights? Absolutely love that.

The Collaborator
All right, guys. What happened? We talked about anything that we didn’t talk about, beyond Phil’s guitar skills, but he still hasn’t demonstrated. So maybe we’ll have you guys come back in another few months and do that. Um, what else should we talk about?

Gregory Moore
Well, john, I think your your interview has been very comprehensive. I really appreciate the time to be with you here today. I’ll just add just one perspective here, which is we’ve talked a lot about data. And I think I’ve made the point that Phil and I were part of an enablement organization. And those two things are go hand in hand with each other. It’s so when we talk about data driven enablement, you it’s not just providing data to the Salesforce, you’ve got to think about what are the actionable what are the selling actions that a seller can take with this data that will improve their performance? So those two things, you know, better together? You know, hashtag better together, in my view,

Unknown Speaker
chocolate,

Phil Aaronson
peanut butter. Can I add one thing to that? The big issue around it is that these are siloed functions in most organizations. You’ve got sales operations that are looking at data and analytics, you know, they’re looking at it from a sales strategy perspective, what kind of information can Give. But the whole point is exactly what you said, since the beginning of the relationship relational database, it is about taking data and turning it into information that people can use, which is, you know, not necessarily the strength of Ops, you know, they can create all kinds of great dashboards. And I say that with much love to all of my sales ops friends. But, you know, it’s, here’s the gap, and we need to be able to enable against that. And the patterns that we’re seeing over time on rep performance also represent gaps and areas that we should invest in. So I’ve had these ideas for a while. I’ve had, you know, some success at other organizations and trying to implement it. But that’s always been the fork in the road. Why are you focused on this, we have this whole sales ops team focused on this, and I get it, but it’s all from like, you know, deal metrics, and a lot of it is, you know, third party, look alike deals, it doesn’t necessarily get into the analytics of the quality of our inputs, right. And it doesn’t necessarily get into the analytics of overall performance over time. And that’s why I am super excited to be on this team. You know, myself, it’s a it’s a small team, we, we really appreciate our strengths. And of course, we’re led by the most interesting man in sales analytics. That would be Greg Moore with us. Not too bad. those commercials.

The Collaborator
Right? Now pull up the cigar or something. And

Gregory Moore
I don’t know was talking about data analytics. But when I do

Phil Aaronson
dead ringer, I

The Collaborator
haven’t seen it before. But you’re right. You are the dos techies, man. Next time you folks come back and talk to us about the the outcomes that you’re seeing. I’m going to try to find a bottle of beer and put Greg’s photo on it. And he can.

Gregory Moore
I’ll tell you, what, if you just give me just two seconds here, and I’ll just step away from the how How’s that? Yeah, that

The Collaborator
was fantastic. What a great ending. I really appreciate you both coming on today. I really do sincerely. Thank you for sharing. Kudos to you guys for winning that award. But also beyond the award, which you know, I like awards as much as anybody who cares and it for a second. It’s about how you’re actually transforming your business. And all the things you’re talking about are so important. And as both of you pointed out, you don’t have to have been million dollar budgets to create these changes. You have to look at the data, it can be cheaply done, to start even in a small way. So take advantage of it. Check out Greg and Phil on LinkedIn. Steal every idea that they put out there because they’re smart guys. Even with that sweater, Greg and I love you, man. But even without sweater smart ideas. We’re sealer. Alright, thank you. All

Unknown Speaker
right.

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